January 2015 Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs

Pāhoehoe lava advancing through forest downslope of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō on November 20, 2014.
āhoehoe lava advancing through forest downslope of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō on November 20, 2014

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
News Release Date: December 17, 2014

Contact: Jessica Ferracane, 808-985-6018

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in January – which is also Volcano Awareness Month, established by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Updates on Kīlauea Volcano's Two Eruptions: Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and Halema‘uma‘u. Kīlauea has been erupting nearly continuously since 1983, when a vent, now called Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, opened on the volcano’s East Rift Zone. Then, in 2008, a second vent opened within Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea. Both eruptions are ongoing. Matt Patrick, a geologist with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, presents an update on the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, a brief overview on the first 30 years of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō eruption, and an in-depth account of the current lava flow that has advanced toward Pāhoa over the past six months. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 6 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium 

Kīlauea Volcano’s Dual Personality: A Historical Perspective. Kīlauea is temperamental, alternating between quiet effusion of lava and violent explosive eruptions. Each eruptive style lasts for centuries and reflects very different conditions in the caldera. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Don Swanson looks at what we know and don’t know about these conditions. The current effusive nature is beguiling but misleading, for the volcano has been explosive for 60 percent of the past 2,500 years. From a historical perspective, there is reason to think that the Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption may be a prelude to an explosive period. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 13 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium 

Lei Hulu Demonstration. Join master lei maker Kilohana Domingo as he demonstrates the intricate art of feather work. See his prized and highly sought-after nā lei hulu. Kilohana also teaches lei making classes at his award-winning B&B in Ka‘ū, Kalaekilohana, and on the mainland. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 14 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai 

Watching Mauna Loa Shake. An earthquake sequence leading to Mauna Loa’s summit eruption in November 1914 was the first to be tracked by newly-installed seismographs at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Though primitive by today’s standards, this was an early success for monitoring and research efforts on Hawaiian volcanoes. U. S. Geological Survey geophysicist Paul Okubo will talk about the relationship between earthquakes and eruptions on Mauna Loa, including an update on the volcano’s current status, and how HVO’s seismic network has evolved over the past century. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 20 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium 

Hula Performance by Haunani’s Aloha Expressions. This popular, award-winning hula hālau is comprised of an all-Hawaiian volunteer group of kāne and wāhine kūpuna (elders) 70 to over 90 years old, singing and dancing hapa-haole mele and hula. They share the aloha spirit with malihini (visitors) on visiting cruise ships, and at the Hilo International Airport. The kūpuna also entertain patients at many of Hilo’s senior kōkua (caring) organizations, and have performed at the park’s annual cultural festival on several occasions. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ Nā Leo Manu, “Heavenly Voices” performances. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 21 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium 

Kahuku ‘Ohana Day. Children of all ages are invited to join park rangers and experience the medicinal values, cultural stories, and uses of Hawaiian plants with Momi Subiono as she shares her knowledge of lā‘au lapa‘au (traditional Hawaiian medicine). Call 808-985-6019 by Jan. 6 to sign up for this program and a free lunch for keiki. Bring water, sunscreen, hat, and long pants. Sponsored by Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and Queen Lili‘uokalani Children’s Center. Free.
When: Sat., Jan. 24 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Kahuku Unit is located between mile markers 70 and 71 off Highway11 in Ka‘ū. 

Pāhoehoe Lava: The Ebb and Flow of Molten Rock. Lava erupted from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent on Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone has been advancing in fits and starts toward the community of Pāhoa since June 2014. After the flow stalled just 170 yards from Pāhoa Village Road in early November, a new breakout of lava began moving toward Pāhoa Marketplace. University of Hawai‘i at Hilo geologists Ken Hon and Cheryl Gansecki have spent decades studying and filming the behavior of pāhoehoe lava, and will use time-lapse and recent videos to explain how and why these flows advance, stall, and inflate. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 27 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium 

-NPS-



Last updated: February 28, 2015

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 52
Hawaii National Park, HI 96718

Phone:

(808) 985-6000

Contact Us