Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Parkʻs March 2017 Events

Sandalwood blooms in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park
Sandalwood blooms in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park

NPS Photo

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News Release Date: February 10, 2017

Contact: Jessica Ferracace/Public Affairs Specialist, 808-985-6018

Hawaiʻi National Park, Hawaiʻi - Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public throughout 2017.

ADIP and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

The Unforeseen Consequences of the Hawaiian Sandalwood Trade. The ‘iliahi (sandalwood) trade in the early 19th century launched the Kingdom of Hawai‘i into the world market. The resulting destruction of the sandalwood forests is well known. Paul Field, park volunteer and retired Professor of History at Windward Community College, will discuss how the sandalwood trade impacted relations between commoners and chiefs, altered the concept of mana, and led to the first official interference of the United States government in the affairs of the Hawaiian Kingdom. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., March 7 at 7 p.m. 
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 
ʻUlana niu
ʻUlana niu

NPS Photo

Weave Coconut Fronds (ʻUlana Niu). Learn how to weave coconut fronds into useful and beautiful items with local expert, Cathy Gouveia. The coconut palm is one of the most useful and important plants in the world. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., March 8 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
 
Kumu Hula Ab Valencia
Kumu Hula Ab Valencia

NPS Photo

Free Hula Performance. Connect to the past and enjoy a free hula performance! Under the direction of Kumu Hula Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia, Hālau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu ma Kīlauea follows a path of learning and protocol that instills the cultures and values of the past so that the legacy of Hawai‘i may continue onward. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., March 15 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
 
A park ranger gazes across Nāpau Crater in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park
A park ranger gazes across Nāpau Crater in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

NPS Photo

Wilderness Hike to Nāpau Crater. Journey through the wilderness of Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone and experience a breadth of volcanic activity from desolate lava fields, and mesmerizing craters, to a lush Hawaiian rainforest. Park Ranger Michael Newman leads this challenging 14-mile, seven-hour, round-trip interpretive trek to the edge of Nāpau Crater. Along the way, peer into massive Makaopuhi Crater, hike over the 1965 and 1969 lava flows to a centuries-old archeological site, the hapu‘u pulu (fern) processing area, and finally gaze into massive Nāpau Crater with Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō visible in the distance, before hiking back. For more information, call (808) 985-6017. Hikers must bring four liters of water per person, lunch and snacks, sturdy closed-toe shoes or boots, long pants, sunscreen, hat and raingear. Free.
When: Sat., March 18 at 9 a.m.
Where: Meet Ranger Michael at the Mauna Ulu Parking Lot, off Chain of Craters Road
 
Keiki play hū kukui
Keiki play hū kukui

NPS Photo

Make Hū Kukui. In old Hawai‘i, children played many simple games now largely forgotten. Help revive the practice of making and playing the traditional Hawaiian top, called hū kukui. Let’s see whose hū kukui can spin the longest! Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., March 22 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
 
ʻŌpeʻapeʻa pups in lychee
ʻŌpeʻapeʻa pups in lychee

Photo courtesy Sean Moura

After Dark in the Park with Hawaiian Bats. ‘Ōpe‘ape‘a (Hawaiian hoary bats) are the only true native terrestrial mammals in Hawai‘i. The Hawaiian hoary bat remains as beautiful as it is elusive. Join USGS bat biologist and researcher Corinna Pinzari as she reveals recent research into bat biology, monitoring, ecology, and genetics projects. She will also examine the current status and distribution of this much beloved and often maligned native mammal. Free. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series.
When: Tues., March 28 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
 
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Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 52
Hawaii National Park, HI 96718

Phone:

(808) 985-6000
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