NPS Chief Historian to Open 2008 Archaeology Lecture Series

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Date: June 11, 2008
Contact: Dr. Robert Cromwell, 360-816-6253

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CHIEF HISTORIAN IS KEYNOTE SPEAKER FOR ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL LECTURE SERIES AT VANCOUVER NATIONAL HISTORIC RESERVE

VANCOUVER, WA – On June 26, 2008, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m., Dr. Robert K. Sutton, chief historian of the National Park Service, will present a free public lecture at Pearson Air Museum to commence the National Park Service’s annual public archaeology lecture series.

Dr. Sutton’s talk is titled "Interpreting the Fur Trade in National Parks." It examines the Hudson’s Bay Company, the American fur trade, and American migration as it is interpreted in our National Parks.

This program is the keynote address for the annual lecture series presented as part of the National Park Service Public Archaeology Field School at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. This year’s lecture series theme is "Progressing through the Past: 60 Years of Archaeology, History, and Interpretation at Fort Vancouver and the Pacific Northwest."

"It is truly an honor to have Dr. Sutton return to his initial posting with the National Park Service and give a professional and personal overview of how the National Park Service interprets the history of the fur trade," said Dr. Robert Cromwell, Archaeologist at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. "As the Chief Historian of the National Park Service and as a former park ranger at Fort Vancouver, Dr. Sutton has a unique and dynamic perspective on the integration of history and public programming as well as the development of National Park Service exhibits, programs, and publications," added Greg Shine, Chief Ranger & Historian at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

Robert K. Sutton became Chief Historian of the National Park Service in October 2007, after serving as Superintendent of Manassas National Battlefield Park for 12 ½ years. From 1986 to 1990, he directed the Historic Preservation and Historical Administration public history programs at Arizona State University. He has published a number of books, articles and reviews on various public history topics. One of his primary interests at Manassas Battlefield and in his current position is preparing for the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War, and as part of that effort he has encouraged Civil War battlefields to expand their interpretive programs to focus more attention to the social, economic, and political issues during the Civil War Era.

Sutton began his career in the Pacific Northwest, working for Fort Vancouver National Historic Site and Oregon State Parks in the 1970s. He also served as curator at the Oregon Historical Society.

This is a free public program sponsored by the National Park Service and the Northwest Cultural Resources Institute, with the Center for Columbia River History and the Vancouver National Historic Reserve Trust.

WHAT: Keynote address for National Park Service Archaeology Field School at on the Vancouver National Historic Reserve.

WHO: Dr. Robert K. Sutton, Chief Historian of the National Park Service, who began his career in the Pacific Northwest.

WHERE: Pearson Air Museum, 1115 E. 5th St., Vancouver, WA

WHEN: Thursday, June 26, 2008, 6:00 p.m.

COST: Free to the public.

DETAILS: For more information contact Dr. Robert Cromwell, Archaeologist, Fort Vancouver National Historic Site at 360-816-6253.

WEBSITEs: https://www.nps.gov/fova/, www.ccrh.org

The National Park Service Archaeology Field School lecture series will include:

July 10, Dr. Mark Warner, "The Wild, Mild West: Domesticating Communities and Households in the Inland Northwest." This program examines the ways in which historical archaeology can change our perceptions of Western settlement.

July 17, Rick McClure, "Lumber Camps, Ranger Outposts, and the CCC: Historical Archaeology in the National Forests." This program explores recent historical archaeology on the national forests.

July 24, Melissa Darby, "The Story of Old John’s Skillet and His Bark-Roofed House." This program uses archaeology and ethnography to integrate site analysis on the Lower Columbia River.

The NPS Archaeology Field School lecture series is free to the public.

All programs will be at 6:00 p.m. at the Pearson Air Museum, 1115 E. 5th St. Vancouver, WA

BACKGROUND:

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, a unit of the National Park Service, is the heart of the Vancouver National Historic Reserve. The Vancouver National Historic Reserve brings together a national park, a premier archaeological site, the region's first military post, an international fur trade emporium, one of the oldest operating airfields, the first national historic site west of the Mississippi River, and a waterfront trail and environmental center on the banks of the Columbia. www.nps.gov/fova

The Northwest Cultural Resources Institute (NCRI), a cooperative partnership based at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, is dedicated to fostering cultural resources research, education, and stewardship in the Pacific Northwest. The NCRI brings together National Park Service staff, university professors, and subject matter experts to facilitate research and training, provide expertise, and support other innovative educational endeavors using national parks as laboratories.

The Center for Columbia River History (CCRH) is dedicated to examining the hidden histories of the Columbia River Basin and to helping people think about the historical record from different perspectives through creative public history and direct engagement with Columbia River Basin communities. CCRH collaborates with other historical and cultural institutions, and offers its programs to schools, libraries, historical societies and public groups. CCRH offices are located on the Vancouver National Historic Reserve. www.ccrh.org



Last updated: February 28, 2015

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