Superintendent’s Compendium

 
National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior


Crater Lake National Park
P.O. Box 7 Crater Lake, OR 97604
(541) 594-3000 Phone
(541) 594-3004 Fax
Superintendent’s Compendium

Of Designations, Closures, Permit Requirements and Other Restrictions Imposed Under Discretionary Authority.

Approved: September 24, 2021
Sean Denniston, Acting Superintendent

In accordance with regulations and the delegated authority provided in Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations (“36 CFR”), Chapter 1, Parts 1-7, authorized by Title 54 United States Code, Section 100751, the following provisions apply to all lands and waters administered by the National Park Service, within the boundaries of Crater Lake National Park. Unless otherwise stated, these regulatory provisions apply in addition to the requirements contained in 36 CFR, Chapter 1, Parts 1-7.

Written determinations, which explain the reasoning behind the Superintendent’s use of discretionary authority, as required by Section 1.5(c), appear in this document identified by italicized print.
 

36 CFR §1.5 Visiting Hours, Public Use Limits, Closures, and Area Designations for Specific Uses or Activities

(a)(1) The following visiting hours, public use limits, and closures are established:

Visiting Hours:
  • Steel Information Center
  • Canfield Building
  • Rim Visitor Center
  • Sinnott Memorial: hours as posted
See the Current Conditions on Park website for further information.

Closures:
  • The following National Park Service buildings and facilities are closed to the public, other than those with posted visitor hours or by Superintendent approval:
  • All park residential areas, roads, and residential buildings (the Headquarters historic district roadway, including the roadway at the stone houses, is open to public pedestrian traffic)
 

36 CFR §1.5 continued

 
  • Sager Building
  • Steel Building: the first floor is open during posted hours for access to the bathrooms, visitor information area (not including the area behind the customer service counter), and Post Office (not including the area behind the customer service counter). The second floor, and all offices or workspaces are closed to the public.
  • Canfield Building (AKA Ranger Station). The lobby, restrooms and hallway that is used to access the restrooms is open during posted hours for Backcountry Permits. The remainder of the building is closed to the public.
  • 1928 building
  • Community Center in Steel Circle
  • Trails maintenance building
  • Warehouse building
  • Natural Resource/Fire Management Building (aka Rat Hall) including garage stalls and fire cache
  • Maintenance building shops, vehicle bays and storage bays
  • Rim Village Community House
  • Fitness center
  • Mount Scott fire lookout
  • Watchman fire lookout
  • Wineglass patrol cabin
  • Wizard Island boathouse and NPS boat dock
  • Annie Springs Entrance Station
  • North Entrance Station
  • National Park Service maintenance yard (except for delineated parking spaces in front of warehouse building, which may be used for public overflow parking as authorized)
  • All National Park Service administered facilities, to include all water and wastewater facilities, access roads to the facilities and the surrounding areas
  • Mazama water tank
  • Munson Valley water tank and 5 feet in all direction from the tank
  • Lost Creek water treatment building
  • Lost Creek Campground for camping
  • Garfield Peak water tank
  • Annie Springs water intake facility, to include the well site at the Pacific Crest Trailhead parking area on Highway 62 and attached water line
  • Sewage treatment facilities at Munson Valley and Mazama Village
  • Public restrooms during seasonal closures (indicated by being locked)
  • South Yard Road and administrative site
  • Pole Creek Road and administrative site
  • Old Ball field road and administrative site
  • Park headquarters weather station
  • Garfield Peak telephone microwave relay panel
  • Anderson/East borrow pit (east of East Rim Drive)
  • Round Top Quarry (East Rim Drive)
  • Wineglass borrow pit (east of Pinnacles Road)
  • Old summer dump (east of Munson Valley Road)
  • Any other service and administrative roads, so designated by signs and/or locked gates, or barricaded with logs and/or boulders.
  • All roofs of building and facility
Justification: Residences are rented and occupied by National Park Service employees. Allowing visitor entry or use to these buildings would significantly disturb the privacy and disrupt the residential life of the occupants. The other buildings, facilities and locations are administrative sites used by the National Park Service in the management and administration of the park. Visitor entry or use of these sites would interfere with the protection of government property, create potentially hazardous conditions for visitors, and interfere with park operations. Because these sites may be located in remote areas and/or staffed intermittently, it is not practical to expect park staff to provide for security and safety, and less restrictive measures will not suffice.

Except for administrative use, the following roads are closed to public vehicular travel during the winter months:
  • West Rim Drive
  • North Entrance Road (North Entrance Road is open to snowmobiles in winter months. See §2.18(c) Snowmobile)
  • East Rim Drive
  • Pinnacles Road
Winter Road Closures will generally occur from late October and no later than November 1st each year and last until June or July. Closure dates will vary depending upon snow depth and road conditions and will be announced on the park website and through press releases.

Justification: These roads are closed due to extreme snow accumulations and there is no winter maintenance on these roads to keep them passable to vehicular traffic. Most of these roads are designated as ski trails in the winter so vehicular and bicycle traffic would be in opposition to the intended winter use. The North Entrance Road is the only designated snowmobile route (see §2.18 below) and other vehicles would be in opposition to this designated winter use.

Public access and use of the Munson Valley Road corridor between the Steel Center and Rim Village (as delineated by a locked gate) is prohibited while that road corridor is under an emergency closure for snow removal operations.
Justification: Snow removal operations subsequent to winter storms are difficult to schedule and often occur on the Munson Valley road with little notification. Public on the road during snow removal operations would be placed at great risk by the hazards of large snow removal machines. The Raven ski trail provides a safe alternative pedestrian access to the Rim during those periods when the Munson Valley road is closed. Less restrictive measures would not adequately provide for visitor safety.

  • The following areas are closed to the operation of All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) or Off- Highway Vehicles (OHVs):
– The operation of off-road motor vehicles, also known as All-Terrain Vehicles (ATV’s) or Off-Highway Vehicles (OHVs), is prohibited within Crater Lake National Park, including on or along paved roadways. This prohibition also applies to vehicles that meet the definition of off-road motor vehicles that are licensed for on-road or highway use by a state government. “Off-road motor vehicle” is defined by Executive Order Number 11644 (37 Federal Register 2887.)
– Off-road motor vehicles and snowmobiles may be allowed for administrative purposes, such as fire control, search and rescue, law enforcement, resource management activities, and maintenance when approved by the Superintendent.
– See section 36 CFR § 4.10 within this compendium for additional information.
– For snowmobile regulations, see below.
 
Justification: The Superintendent has determined that the use of off-road motor vehicles within the park is inconsistent with the mission of the park and other visitor pursuits and is further prohibited to protect the fragile resources of the park and ensure visitor safety.

  • Seasonal Trail Closures:
Garfield Peak Trail, Watchman Trail, Cleetwood Cove Trail, Mt. Scott Trail, Sinnott Memorial: Open except during posted seasonal temporary closures as necessary to prevent resource damage and ensure visitor safety. See the park map for locations of trails or click here to go to the park website where you can view the park map. Click here to go the park website for a current park conditions report.

Justification: During the late spring and early summer, use of these trails by park visitors can contribute to damage of sensitive natural resources located adjacent to these trails. In addition, snow and ice can cause dangerous conditions for hikers.

  • Use of wheeled devices, in or upon which equipment and/or personnel may be transported, is prohibited on all park trails. This prohibition does not apply to a mobility-impaired person using a manual or motorized wheelchair as a pedestrian (see §1.2(e)) or to baby strollers when used to transport a child. The follow ing trails are accessible:
– Godfrey Glen
– Plaikni Falls
– Sun Notch
– Pinnacles Trail
  • For information on accessible trails in the park click here.
Justification: Visitor use of trails in the park consists of hiking and stock use. Front country trails are characterized by heavy visitor use. Backcountry trails are characterized by light visitor use, and are managed primarily for wilderness values. Wheeled devices are incompatible with these uses. Park trails typically have steep ascents and descents, narrow treads, and frequent sharp turns and switchbacks. Large vertical exposures on steep slopes and cliffs are common. Trail surfaces consist of loose soil, gravel and rocks. Because of the difficulty of controlling human-powered wheeled devices on trails, there is a significant potential for loss of control and accidents. Because there is no practical way to individually evaluate the capabilities of a visitor using wheeled devices, or the devices themselves, less restrictive measures would not adequately provide for visitor safety.

  • Phantom Ship is closed to public entry.
Justification: Phantom Ship is an isolated, unique geological formation within Crater Lake, consisting of steep unstable rock. It is considered a visual icon symbolic of the lake. Visitor use of this formation would damage the geological resources and would expose visitors to serious accidents involving falls into the lake. Because of its topography and remote location, there are not less restrictive measures that would adequately protect the natural features and public safety.

  • Areas within the Crater Lake caldera between the caldera rim edge and Crater Lake except the Cleetwood Cove Trail and areas on the shoreline extending 300 feet on either side of the Cleetwood dock facility are closed to public entry.
Justification: The inner walls of the caldera as well as some areas near the caldera rim consist of extremely steep, unstable rocks and soils. As part of the Crater Lake view shed, these natural features form part of a visual icon that symbolizes the park. Visitor use of the inner caldera walls would damage the highly sensitive geological resources, as well as damage and/or disturb plants and animals that live in this highly unique area. Hiking in the caldera would also expose visitors to the potential for serious accidents involving falls. On a regular basis, visitors who violate this closure become stranded or injured and require rescue by the National Park Service, exposing rescuers to hazardous conditions. This closure is necessary to protect the unique and fragile resources that exit within below the caldera rim and to act as a deterrent to prevent accidents. Because the size of the 
caldera and the nature of its topography, there are not less restrictive measures that would adequately protect the natural features and public safety. 

  • Wizard Island is closed to the public except during summer daytime hours for visitors who access the island via authorized boat tours. All visitors must depart the island with the final concession boat of the day.
Justification: Wizard Island is located within Crater Lake and the only approved public access to the island is by concession boats. The public is prohibited for resource protection and safety concerns from entering within the caldera except on the Cleetwood trail. Swimming is restricted in the lake to within 100 yards of Cleetwood Cove and within 100 yards of Wizard Island. As such, it is not possible for the public to access the island by swimming or crossing any ice bridges that may exist on the lake in the winter. Overnight stays by the public could compromise the security of park and concession facilities on the island, result in negative impacts to natural resources and expose visitors to unnecessary hazards or risks due to the isolation on the island with no transportation back to shore, no services, and no staff on the island for emergency assistance. Administrative use is allowed with the approval of the Park Superintendent.

  • The area within 500 yards of Peregrine Falcon, Bald Eagle, and Spotted Owl nesting sites during critical nesting periods is closed to public entry.
Justification: Peregrine Falcons and Bald Eagles are a species of concern that nest within the park. The breeding success and nestling survival can be negatively impacted by human presence during the breeding season. Because of the location of nesting and hack sites, it is not feasible to staff them to prevent visitor entry, or to install physical barriers to prevent disturbance. Less restrictive measures would not adequately protect Peregrine Falcon nesting and hack sites. Spotted Owls are an endangered species that nest within the park. The breeding success and nestling survival can be negatively impacted by human presence during the breeding season. Because of the location of nesting, it is not feasible to staff them to prevent visitor entry, or to install physical barriers to prevent disturbance. Less restrictive measures would not adequately protect Spotted Owl nesting sites

  • The Llao Rock Research Natural Area (RNA) is closed to public entry whenever the area is covered by less than one continuous foot of snow. The Llao Rock RNA is located along the northwest caldera rim and encompasses 435 acres.
Justification: Prior to the last decade, Llao Rock received minimal recreational use. However, it has recently become increasingly popular and has even been mentioned in several media sources as a hiking destination. The Llao Rock RNA was designated in 1994 to protect rare plant species and preserve Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) communities, subalpine pumice and ash fields, and an alpine community mosaic. The increased visitor use has led to damage to sensitive resources which the RNA was designated to preserve and protect. The seasonal closure will ensure that these fragile resources are given the appropriate level of protection and further damage is limited. It will also allow for restoration of areas currently impacted by hiking activity.

  • Fishing is prohibited in the following areas:
– Sun Creek
– Lost Creek

Justification: Sun Creek and Lost Creek contain populations of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus),a native fish listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The park is engaged in a long-term project to eradicate non-native fish species from these creeks and restore sustainable population of bull trout. Allowing fishing would jeopardize this species due to take, injury and mortality caused by catching, snagging, injuring while releasing, or keeping bull trout. There are no less restrictive measures that would provide adequate protection to bull trout.

  • Vidae Falls and surrounding area within 100 feet of Vidae Falls is closed to public entry.
Justification: Vidae Falls is a fragile ecosystem that hosts a variety of flora which is easily impaired. Visitor use of this area has caused damage to the plants and soil resources immediate surround the waterfalls. Because of its location along the roadway, there are not less restrictive measures that would adequately protect the natural features.

  • SCUBA and Snorkeling is prohibited in Crater Lake.
The Superintendent has issued a temporary closure of Crater Lake to all SCUBA diving, snorkeling, and any swimming that includes the use of wet suits, masks, fins, towable devices or other than standard swim suits. The park will be soliciting for public comments on a proposed permanent closure of Crater Lake to such activities in order to protect against the introduction of non-native or invasive aquatic species that could seriously alter the lake ecosystem. For designated swimming areas, see below.Justification: Crater Lake is considered to contain what may be the purest,  clearest water found anywhere in the world. In order to best protect this fragile and unique resource, the lake has been closed to the above activities which could introduce non-native or invasive aquatic species that could threaten the integrity of this resource. Non-native or invasive aquatic species have wreaked havoc on other aquatic systems. The lake already contains non-native fish and crayfish introduced during the early years of the park before there was sound science to warn against such actions. Park personnel have worked for decades to overcome the impacts of these early introductions. In order to protect the lake for the wonder and admiration of current and future visitors it is necessary to strictly limit activities such as those above that could threaten its continued purity.

Justification: Crater Lake is considered to contain what may be the purest, clearest water found anywhere in the world. In order to best protect this fragile and unique resource, the lake has been closed to the above activities which could introduce non-native or invasive aquatic species that could threaten the integrity of this resource. Non-native or invasive aquatic species have wreaked 
havoc on other aquatic systems. The lake already contains non-native fish and crayfish introduced during the early years of the park before there was sound science to warn against such actions. Park personnel have worked for decades to overcome the impacts of these early introductions. In order to protect the lake for the wonder and admiration of current and future visitors it is necessary to strictly limit activities such as those above that could threaten its continued purity.

  • Unmanned aircraft use is prohibited.
– Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of Crater Lake National Park is prohibited except as approved in writing by the 
superintendent.
 
– The term “unmanned aircraft” means a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links). This term includes all types of devices that meet this definition (e.g., model airplanes, quadcopters, drones) that are used for any purpose, including for recreation or commerce.

Justification: The use of unmanned aircraft within the park could pose significant health and safety hazards to other park visitors. Use of such equipment is also incompatible with the scenic, esthetic, and wilderness values for which Crater Lake National Park was, in part, created and is managed such as pristine view sheds, natural soundscapes, solitude, freeranging wildlife, etc. In addition the use of unmanned aircraft may significantly impact wildlife, including rare or endangered species, such as Bald Eagles, Spotted Owls, Peregrine Falcons, Sierra Nevada Red Fox, etc. The use of unmanned aircraft may also interfere with Search and Rescue, Fire, Law Enforcement, Resource Management, Maintenance and Interpretation operations within the park which may create unnecessary hazards or disturbances for personnel engaged in and members of the public involved in such operations.

  • Picnicking by the public is prohibited in the following areas:
– Within 200 feet of concession residential areas

– Within 200 feet of National Park Service administrative buildings 

– Within 200 feet of National Park Service residential areas

Justification: Picnicking use by the visiting public would interfere with park operations, concession operations, and residential privacy.

  • The Picnic Hill Picnic Area is closed to public use from sunset until sunrise each day.
Justification: Camping within the park is restricted to developed campgrounds or backcountry campsites by permit only. Overnight camping or parking is inconsistent with the purpose of these picnic areas. The Picnic Hill Picnic Area is located within close proximity to the Crater Lake Lodge and the Rim Dorm concession residential facility. Activities in this area after dark would have the potential to disturb guests and residents in those facilities due to noise, lights, etc.
 

(a)(2) The following areas are designated for a specific use or activity and/or the following conditions or restrictions are imposed on a specific use or activity:


Areas Designated for a Specific Use or Activity:
Masks
When the COVID-19 Community Level is LOW or MEDIUM in the county or all the counties where the park is located based on data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals are not required to wear masks.

When the COVID-19 Community Level is HIGH in the county or all the counties where the park is located based on data provided by the CDC, all individuals over the age of two must wear masks, regardless of vaccination status, in all common areas and shared workspaces in buildings owned, leased, or otherwise controlled by the National Park Service, including, but not limited to, park visitor centers, administrative offices, lodges, gift shops and restaurants.

When the COVID-19 Community Level is HIGH in one or more, but not all, of the counties where the park is located based on data provided by the CDC, the superintendent will determine whether individuals are required to wear masks. The requirement, if any, will apply to all facilities within the park.

Masks must cover the nose and mouth and fit snugly around the nose and chin with no large gaps around the sides of the face. Masks not designed to be protective, masks with ventilation valves, and face shields do not meet the requirement.

Regardless of the COVID-19 Community Level, individuals may wear masks if they choose to do so. Where a state, local, tribal, or territorial government where the park is located imposes more protective mask-wearing requirements than those indicated by the COVID-19 Community Level, individuals must follow those more protective requirements within the park. More protective state, local, tribal, or territorial mask-wearing requirements are hereby adopted as federal requirements in all units of the National Park System located within that state, locality, area subject to a federally recognized Indian tribe’s regulatory jurisdiction, or territory, regardless of a particular park’s jurisdictional status.

Additionally, all individuals must wear masks in or on public transportation conveyances and transportation hubs/facilities, to the extent required by current orders or directives issued by the CDC, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), or other federal agencies with jurisdiction over those conveyances or areas. As of March 4, 2022, CDC and TSA orders or directives require all individuals regardless of vaccination status to wear masks in indoor areas of all forms of public transportation conveyances, including busses, trains, and boats/ferries, and in the indoor premises of transportation hubs/facilities. Individuals are not required to wear masks while outdoors on conveyances or while outdoors on the premises of transportation hubs/facilities.

Occupancy Limits
The number of visitors in the following indoor locations may not exceed the maximum occupancy identified for each location.
Indoor Location Maximum Occupancy
Crater Lake Lodge Lobby 8
Crater Lake Lodge Dining Room 34
Annie Creek Restaurant 40
Crater Lake Lodge Great Gall 44
Annie Creek Gift Shop 10
Mazama Camper Store 10
Rim Cafe and Gift Shop 30
Community House (NHA park Store 15
Backcountry Office (Canfield Lobby) 2
All other common areas: Maximum Occupancy will be set a the number of individuals that will allow for 6-foot distancing
Entering or remaining in any of the indoor locations identified in the table above after being asked not to enter or to leave the location because the maximum occupancy has been reached is prohibited.
Justification: The Department of the Interior (DOI) COVID-19 Workplace Safety Plan (available at DOI COVID-19 Workplace Safety Plan) states that no indoor workplace or visitor experience facility, venue, or other areas where visitors typically congregate in large numbers should operate above 25% of normal occupancy standards during periods of significant or high community transmission of COVID-19 as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Camping:
  • Front-country camping is restricted to designated campsites in established campgrounds and backcountry camping is restricted to those locations listed in the terms and conditions under §2.10 of this compendium.
– Camping is prohibited in all parking areas, roadside pullouts, picnic areas, trailheads or any other area not designated as a campsite.
– Please refer to §2.10 of this compendium for additional camping information.
Justification: These restrictions are in place to reduce resource damage, sanitation and litter issues, food storage issues, illegal campfires, and other negative impacts caused by out of bounds camping.

Docking/Mooring
  • The following are designated docking or mooring areas:
– Within 50 feet of the Cleetwood Cove docks
– Within 50 feet of the Cleetwood Cove mooring buoys
– Within 50 feet of the Wizard Island docks
Chains and/or Traction Tire Requirements:
  • When traffic control signs are posted, it is unlawful for any vehicle to enter the controlled area without having mounted on its drive tires the traction devices specified by the sign, which must also meet the requirements of Oregon Administrative Rules (OARs) 734-017-0005 (http://arcweb.sos.state.or.us/pages/rules/oars_700/oar_734/734_017.html). When “Chains Required” signs are posted, all-wheel drive vehicles shall be exempt from the chain requirement when all wheels are in gear and are equipped with approved traction devices as specified in OARs 734-017-0005 provided that tire chains for at least one set of drive tires are carried in the vehicle.

Conditions and Restrictions on Specific Uses or Activities:
Snowmobiling
  • During the period that snow closes the North Entrance road to wheeled motor vehicles used by the public, snowmobile use is permitted on the North Entrance Road from its intersection with the Rim Drive to the park boundary (The closure to wheeled motor vehicles and opening to snowmobiles is implemented and rescinded each year by Superintendent’s memo). Administrative use, including travel by bicycle may be authorized if the road closes to wheeled motor vehicles, but the snow accumulation precludes snowmobiling.
Justification: Snows accumulate to a depth that makes removal efforts impractical. During these periods, use of wheeled vehicles is impossible. This restriction and use limit fulfills the legal requirements of 36 CFR §7.2(c) for Snowmobile use permitted in Crater Lake National Park.
Grayback Road
  • The Grayback road is closed to motorized vehicles operated by the public. This road is designated as a horseback, hiking, bicycling, non-motorized route.
Justification: The closure of the Grayback road to motorized vehicles was identified as the preferred alternative in the 2005 General Management Plan Environmental Impact Statement.
Trailer towing
  • The Picnic Hill Road is closed to vehicles towing a trailer
Justification: The steep grades, narrow roadway, sharp turns, and lack of turnaround spots on this road make trailer towing unsafe.
Vehicle idling prohibited
  • Engines must be shut down except while actively loading or unloading passengers. This does not preclude vehicles from reasonable warm-up times away from concentrated visitor use or residential areas. In developed areas or parking areas, loading or unloading passengers, engine warm-up or idling is limited to 10 minutes.
Justification: The idling of vehicle engines adds unnecessary exhaust fumes to the air and diminishes the enjoyment by visitors of the peace and tranquility of the park.
Firewood
  • No person shall transport, by any means, untreated firewood into the Park, for sale or use within the Park, from any location outside of the Pacific Northwest.
  • The park adopts Oregon state law as applicable in the park. See ORS 570.720 for further information on state firewood regulations.
  • “Pacific Northwest” means the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho.
  • “Untreated Firewood” means any firewood that has not been heat treated to a minimum wood core temperature of 60oC (140oF) for at least 60 minutes or equivalent treatment as approved by the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA). Air drying of firewood is insufficient and is not approved by ODA. Post treatment firewood must be stored in a manner to minimize re-infestation.
  • Firewood purchased for use in the park or sold within the park must be labeled as “Approved Pacific Northwest Firewood” for all firewood from sources wholly within the Pacific Northwest or “Approved Pest Free” for all treated firewood meeting the ODA treatment standard whether harvested from the Pacific Northwest or elsewhere.
  • For further information on firewood restrictions, preventing the spread of invasive forest pests, and the “Buy It Where You Burn It” Campaign go to the “Oregon Invasive Species Council” website or the National “Don’t Move Firewood” website.
Justification: This restriction is established to protect Crater Lake National Park from the introduction of invasive species, including non-native wood- boring insects and plant diseases, transported on firewood from outside the Pacific Northwest.
Non-motorized Vehicle Days
  • Effective 2015, the park designates the second and third Saturdays in September as Non-motorized Vehicle Days on the East Rim Drive. This is not a special event sponsored by an outside group, but a park designated activity in keeping with the park’s approved General Management Plan and Record of Decision to provide alternate non-motorized recreational activities, specifically along East Rim Drive.
  • To accommodate the designated Non-motorized Vehicle Days, the following annual restrictions and conditions will be in place on the East Rim Drive:
– The only exceptions would be for motorized vehicles are wheel chairs utilized by mobility impaired visitors and administrative or emergency use by authorized personnel.

– The restriction will be in place on the East Rim Drive from North Junction to the Park Headquarters/Visitor Center Area. The restriction will include Pinnacles Road which is located off the restricted portion of the East Rim Drive.
– To accommodate the Non-motorized Vehicle Days, the Lost Creek Campground will be closed from approximately 3:00 PM on Friday until one hour before sunset on Saturday each of the two Saturdays.
– To accommodate the Non-motorized Vehicle Days, East Rim Drive will be closed to motor vehicles beginning at 10:00 PM on the Friday before each of the two Saturdays.
– Parking for visitors will be available at North Junction, the parking lot by the maintenance building and at a gravel parking lot 1/4 mile south of Park Headquarters.
– The North Entrance Road, West Rim Drive, Munson Valley Road and Highway 62 through the park will remain open for normal vehicular traffic on these days, weather and road conditions allowing.
– E-bikes will be permitted in accordance with NPS regulations guiding their use.

Justification: The designation of Non-motorized Vehicle Days is in response to significant interest from the public, the Oregon Congressional delegation, and stakeholder groups to provide opportunities to experience the beauty, quiet and solitude of Crater Lake without the intrusion of motor vehicles during the summer season and to provide for a safer environment for non- motorized users to enjoy the same. The designation is also in keeping with the recommendations of the 2005 Record of Decision for the Park’s General Management Plan which directed the park to develop “new opportunities along Rim Drive [which] will allow visitors to directly experience the primary resource of Crater Lake in ways other than driving. Any new uses around the rim will be non-motorized and low impact. Opportunities to experience the lake by hiking and biking in a quieter setting will be explored by experimental seasonal road closures of East Rim Drive.” See Record of Decision (ROD) on the Final General Management Plan / Environmental Impact Statement for Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, August 31, 2005. The Non-motorized Vehicle Days are also in keeping with the park’s goals to promote and increase climate friendly and green modes of transportation in the park and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The days and times were chosen in September as they coincide with traditionally lower park visitation at that time of year and limit conflict with other visitor uses on the lake. The two Saturdays provides two separate Saturdays for the Non-motorized Vehicle activities to best guarantee against adverse weather conditions on one or the other, and allows time each day following the restrictions for visitors in motor vehicles to travel the East Rim Drive after sunset and also allows regular access to East Rim Drive for all transportation methods on Sunday of each weekend.


Winter Parking
  • There is no overnight parking allowed on Munson Valley Road or in Rim Village during the time of year when snow is prevalent. The overnight parking area for park visitors is at the northeast end of the Trail Cache building in the Headquarters area. Vehicles parked at Rim Village, beginning just east of the Rim Comfort Station, even with the Community House, and continuing towards the Crater Lake Lodge, must be parked in a single file line down the centerline of the road. The end of this road, nearest the Lodge, is used as a Snowplow turnaround and Fire Lane, and must be kept clear to allow equipment turn around, and access to the fire hydrant. No vehicle parking is allowed closer than 40 feet from the end of the road.
Justification: Identification of where vehicles can be parked in the winter is necessary for the safe and timely removal of snow from the roadway, while ensuring privately owned vehicles do not become blocked in by snow, or damaged by snow removal equipment. Munson Valley Road from the Headquarters area to the Rim may close at anytime due to weather or road conditions. Allowing overnight parking at Rim Village may trap vehicles and occupants for unknown periods of time which may lead to unnecessary risk for rescuers and the vehicle occupants.
Snow structures
  • Any snow structures (snow caves, ramps, half pipes, etc.) shall be demolished after use by the person(s) who constructed it, returning the area to its natural state.
  • Snow structures are not allowed to be constructed within 50 yards of Munson Valley Road, Highway 62, and the roadways around Rim Village, Steel Circle or Sleepy Hollow.
Justification: Allowing snow structures to remain after us poses a hazard for other park visitors. For example, snowcave roofs may weaken and become concealed which could collapse is walked upon by a visitor which could result in injury or death. Prohibiting snow structures from being constructed within 50 yards of roadways that are regularly plowed for motor vehicle access during the winter months reduces the risks associated with snow removal equipment striking someone, directly or indirectly who may be utilizing the snow structure.

Swimming and wading
  • Swimming is allowed within 100 yards of Cleetwood Cove and within 100 yards of Wizard Island, provided that swimmers remain at least 50 feet away from any boat, boat dock or buoy (see exception under §3.16 above).
  • Swimming or wading within 50 feet of any boat, boat dock or buoy on Crater Lake is prohibited, except that swimming is allowed from the public boat dock on Wizard Island when not in use by park boats. Swimmers must immediately exit the water and clear the dock area whenever a boat is on approach to the dock, moored at the dock or departing from the dock. Swimming is not allowed from the National Park Service boat dock which is open to authorized personnel only.
  • Swimming within fencing, buoys, lines (approx. 15 feet) of the bulkhead docking material is prohibited at all times.
Justification: Swimming or wading in and around the boats, busy boat docks or buoys would present a hazard to the safety of those engaged in that activity. These facilities and vessels have sharp and hazardous projections and submerged unseen entanglement dangers. Less restrictive methods would not adequately provide visitor safety. The shoreline at Wizard Island can be difficult for persons to maneuver along to access the lake to go swimming. Only a few boat tours a day stop at the island’s public dock so swimming from the docks should not interfere with boat operations nor pose any significant safety concerns if activities cease when boats are in the area of the docks.
  • The use of any other swimming accessories other than standard swim suits or clothing is prohibited. Such accessories include: wetsuits, masks, fins, towable devices, inflatable tubes/mattresses or other swim accessories. SCUBA diving and snorkeling are not permitted in Crater Lake.
Justification: Crater Lake is considered to contain what may be the purest, clearest water found anywhere in the world. In order to best protect this fragile and unique resource, the lake has been closed to the use of such equipment that could introduce non-native or invasive aquatic species that could threaten the integrity of this resource. Non-native or invasive aquatic species have wreaked havoc on other aquatic systems.
 

36 CFR §1.6 – Activities That Require a Permit

(f) The following is a compilation of those activities for which a permit from the superintendent is required:

  • §1.5 Scientific research
  • §2.4(d) Carry or possess a weapon, trap, or net (See exceptions under 2.4(h) below)
  • §2.5(a) Specimen collection, inventory, and monitoring (Take plant, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals)
  • §2.10(a) All camping activities within the park, specifically:
– Camping in Lost Creek Campground
– Camping in Mazama Campground (a paid receipt from the concessionaire will serve as the camping permit)
– Backcountry camping
– Please see section 36 CFR §2.10 for other designations and restrictions related to camping
  • §2.12 Audio Disturbances:
– (a)(2) Operating a chain saw in developed areaso
– (a)(3) Operation of any type of portable motor or engine, or device powered by a portable motor or engine in non-developed areas
– (a)(4) Operation of a public address system in connection with a public gathering or special event for which a permit has been issued pursuant to §2.50 or §2.51
  • §2.17 Aircraft & Air Delivery:
– (a)(3) Delivery or retrieval of a person or object by parachute, helicopter or other airborne means
– (c)(1) Removal of a downed aircraft
  • §2.23(b) Entry to the park.
– Employee vehicle entrance permits:
A free entrance permit is required for all private vehicles operated by park employees and residents to enter the park.

Vehicles must be registered and permits affixed to the vehicle within seven days of bringing a vehicle into the park.

Permits can be obtained at the Backcountry Office.

Vehicle owners must present valid registration and proof of insurance to be issued an entrance permit.

Employee vehicle permits are valid only while the person is employed/lives within the park and must be surrendered upon termination of employment.

Permits are vehicle-specific and non-transferable; a new permit is required for each vehicle registered
  • §2.37 Soliciting or demanding gifts, money goods or services (Pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit issued under §2.50, §2.51 or §2.52)
  • §2.38 Explosives:
– (a) Use, possess, store, transport explosives, blasting agents
– (b) Use or possess fireworks
  • §2.50(a) Conduct a sports event, pageant, regatta, public spectator attraction, entertainment, ceremony, and similar events
  • §2.51(a)* Demonstrations, picketing, speechmaking, marching, holding vigils or religious services, and all other like forms of conduct that involve the communication or expression of views or grievances, engaged in by one or more persons.
  • §2.52(c)* Sale or distribution of printed matter that is not solely commercial advertising* Groups of 25 or less meeting all the conditions listed in 36 CFR 2.51 and 2.52 are not required to have a permit for activities listed in §2.51(a) and §2.52(a).
  • §2.60(b) Livestock use
  • §2.61(a) Residing on federal lands
  • §2.62 Memorialization:
– (a) Erection of monuments (Requires approval from Regional Director)
– (b) Scattering ashes from human cremation
  • §3.3 Use of a vessel (Superseded by 7.2(b)), No private vessel or motor may be used on the waters of the park.
  • §3.12(b) Towing a person using a parasail, hang-glider or other airborne device. (Superseded by 7.2(b)), No private vessel or motor may be used on the waters of the park.
  • §3.14(a) Removing sunken, grounded, or disabled vessel. (Superseded by 7.2(b)), No private vessel or motor may be used on the waters of the park.
  • §3.19 Use of manned or unmanned submersibles. (Superseded by 7.2(b)), No private vessel or motor may be used on the waters of the park.
  • §4.11(a) Exceeding of established vehicle load, weight and size limits
  • §5.1 Advertisements - (Display, posting or distribution)
  • §5.3 Engaging in or soliciting any business (Requires a permit, contract or other written agreement with the United States, or must be pursuant to special regulations)
  • §5.4(a) Commercial transportation of passengers by motor vehicles for the purpose of conducting sightseeing tours on Rim Drive
  • §5.5 Commercial Photography/Filming:
o (a) Commercial filming of motion pictures or television involving the use of professional casts, settings or crews, other than bona fide newsreel or news television
o (b) Still photography of vehicles, or other articles of commerce or models for the purpose of commercial advertising

  • §5.7 Construction of buildings, facilities, trails, roads, boat docks, path, structure, etc
  • §5.10(a) Operation of eating, drinking or lodging establishments.
*For permit information, please contact the park at (541) 594-3052 or visit the park website at: https://www.nps.gov/crla/planyourvisit/permitsandreservations.htm
 

36 CFR §2.1 – Preservation of Natural, Cultural, and Archeological Resources

(a)(4) Dead wood on the ground may be collected for use as fuel for campfires within the park in the following areas:

  • Areas of the park below 6,900 feet in elevation
Justification: Trees growing above the 6,900 elevation are generally sparse, stunted and produce very little wood due to long, severe winters and short growing seasons. These conditions also produce stunted and sculpted growth forms that are an important part of the scenic resource at the caldera rim. Because of the scant dead and down wood available at these higher elevations, visitors collecting firewood in these areas often damage trees by breaking off living and dead branches.

(a)(5) Walking on, climbing, entering, ascending, descending, or traversing an archeological or cultural resource, monument, or statue is allowed in the following areas:

  • No areas are designated. Walking on, climbing, entering, ascending, descending, or traversing an archeological or cultural resource, monument, or statue is prohibited.

(b) Hiking or pedestrian traffic is restricted to the trail tread or walkway on the following trails/walkways:

  • Cleetwood Cove Trail
  • Union Peak Trail – that section above timberline
  • Annie Creek Canyon Trail
  • Watchman Trail
  • West Rim Trail
  • Garfield Peak Trail
  • Mount Scott Trail
  • Godfrey Glenn Trail
  • Pinnacles trail
  • Castle Crest trail
Justification: These trails or walkways are characterized by steep terrain, unstable soil and rocks, switchbacks that place trail segments directly upslope from other trail segments, fragile vegetation, exposure to extremely steep cliffs and slopes, and significant visitor use. Hiking or pedestrian traffic off the established trail tread or walkway exposes visitors to the risks of falling or being struck by rock fall, and has resulted in accidents. It also causes crushing and uprooting of vegetation, soil erosion or compaction, and the establishment of multiple parallel trail treads. Because of the location and length of these trails, it is not feasible to staff them to prevent visitors from leaving the established trail, nor is it feasible to install physical barriers to prevent this. Less restrictive measures would not adequately provide for resource protection and visitor safety.

(c)(1), (c)(2) The following fruits, nuts, berries or unoccupied seashells may be gathered by hand for personal use or consumption, in accordance with the noted size, quantity, collection sites and/or use or consumption restrictions:

  • Blueberries (Vaccinium species). One quart per person, per day, per year, possession limit. Must be consumed within the park.
  • Huckleberries (Vaccinium species). One quart per person, per day, per year, possession limit. Must be consumed within the park.
  • Pacific Serviceberries (Amelanchier species). One quart per person, per day, per year, possession limit. Must be consumed within the park.
  • Western Thimbleberries (Rubus parviflora). One quart per person, per day, per year, possession limit. Must be consumed within the park.
  • No designated collection sites for any of the above berries. All areas are open to the collection of the berries.
Justification: The time required for hand gathering of these berries, and the amounts that can realistically be gathered and consumed by persons while in the park, allow them to be gathered without adverse impacts to park resources. Areas on other public lands near the park typically have denser concentrations of these berries, which attracts users who desire larger quantities and relieves potential demand for berry gathering within the park. These species are not listed or candidates for federal or state threatened or endangered status. There is not any documented or anecdotal evidence that gathering these berries by hand for personal consumption within the park adversely affects park wildlife, the reproductive potential of these plant species, or otherwise adversely affects park resources.
 

36 CFR §2.2 - Wildlife Protection

(d) The transporting of lawfully taken wildlife or portions thereof through the park is allowed under the following conditions and procedures:

  • Transport of wildlife or portions thereof legally taken outside the park must be by the most direct route through the park to the person’s destination and no such game may remain in the park overnight unless it is possessed by a park resident at their assigned park residence.
  • Park residents may transport wildlife legally taken outside the park from any park entrance directly to their residence.
  • Wildlife legally taken outside the park may be transported on the following park roads:
– Highway 62 from the west park boundary to the south park boundary, connecting State Highway 62.

  • Lawfully taken wildlife transported through the park shall be completely covered or otherwise kept out of view, and must be properly tagged in accordance with state law.
  • Persons transporting legally taken game must possess a valid state hunting license.
  • Park law enforcement is authorized to check any wildlife so transported for adherence to these conditions and state regulations that apply.
  • Wildlife wounded outside the park during a legal hunt, which subsequently comes into the park, may only be pursued and retrieved from the park by the hunter who wounded the animal after receiving permission from the Superintendent or designee and only if accompanied by a law enforcement park ranger. Contact Park Dispatch at (541) 776-7206 for assistance.
Justification: Since hunting is not allowed within the park, the Superintendent has determined it is prohibited to transport legally taken wildlife within the park except for the limited circumstances outlined above. For the safety of park visitors and staff and the protection of park resources,the Superintendent has authorized the retrieval of wildlife wounded legally outside the park which subsequently enters into the park only if the hunter who wounded the animal is accompanied by a park law enforcement ranger.

(e) The following areas are closed to the viewing of wildlife with the use of an artificial light:

  • All areas in the park are closed. Viewing wildlife with the use of artificial light is prohibited throughout the park (This prohibition includes both visible e light and infrared light).

Justification: Artificial light and flash photography can significantly affect the normal behavior and activities of wildlife which can affect their health and survival.
 

36 CFR §2.3 – Fishing

(a) The following State fishing laws and/or regulations, as noted, do not apply in the listed areas:

  • Size restrictions, catch limits and possession limits for Rainbow Trout and Kokanee Salmon do not apply in Crater Lake. There are no size, catch or possession limits for these fish.
  • Size restrictions, catch limits and possession limits for Brook Trout and Brown Trout do not apply within the boundaries of the park. There are no size, catch or possession limits for Brook Trout and Brown Trout.
  • A state fishing license. A state fishing license is not required while fishing within the boundaries of the park.
Note: Fishing is prohibited in Sun Creek and Lost Creek, as described above.


(d)(2) Fresh waters designated as open to bait fishing with live or dead minnows or other bait fish, amphibians, fish eggs or fish roe:

  • No waters are designated as open to fishing with the types of bait identified above. The use of any organic bait, to include worms/night crawlers, is not permitted within the park. Only nonorganic, artificial lures may be used in accordance with state law.

(d)(8) Fishing from motor road bridges, from or within 200 feet of a public raft or float designated for water sports, or within the limits of locations designated as swimming beaches, surfing areas, or public boat docks [is prohibited] except in designated areas:

  • The Superintendent has designated the boat docks at Wizard Island as open to fishing when not in use by park boats. Fishing activities must cease whenever a boat is on approach to the dock, moored at the dock or departing from the dock.
  • Fishing is prohibited from motor road bridges and all other public boat docks.
Justification: The shoreline at Wizard Island can be difficult for persons to maneuver along when fishing due to sharp rocks. Only a few boat tours a day stop at the island along with an occasional park owned vessel so fishing activities from the docks should not interfere with boat operations nor pose any significant safety concerns if activities cease when boats are in the area of the docks.

36 CFR §2.4 – Weapons, Traps and Nets

(a)(2)(i) Weapons, traps, or nets may only be carried, possessed or used at the following designated times and locations:

  • No designated times and locations. Using weapons, traps or nets is prohibited. Fishing is only permitted by hook and line, with the rod or line being closely attended, as provided for in §2.3(d)(1).

Within the park, the following buildings are designated as “federal facilities” and shall be signed to indicate that firearms are prohibited inside these buildings in accordance with 18 USC 930:

  • Steel Visitor Center
  • Sager Building (Park Headquarters)
  • Canfield Building (Ranger Station)
  • Natural Resources/Fire Management Building (aka Rat Hall)
  • Park Maintenance Building
  • Science and Learning Center
  • Annie Creek and North Entrance Stations
  • Kaiser Studio
  • Sinnott Memorial
  • Rim Village Community House
  • 1928 Building
  • Rim Café and Gift Shop
  • Annie Creek Restaurant and Gift Shop
  • Mazama Camper Store including public laundry and shower facility
  • Crater Lake Lodge
  • Mazama Dormitories
  • Rim Dormitory
  • Any other building so identified by a sign on the entrance notifying that firearms are not allowed inside in accordance with 18 USC 930.
Justification: Federal facilities are buildings or parts thereof owned or leased by the Federal Government, where Federal employees are regularly present for the purpose of performing official duties. 18 USC 930 is Federal law that supersedes Section 512 of Public Law 111-24 and prohibits the possession of a firearm or other dangerous weapon in a Federal facility unless specifically authorized. All concession facilities within the park are owned by the National Park Service and various park employees routinely perform work functions within those facilities.

36 CFR §2.5 – Research Specimens

(a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals is prohibited except in accordance with other regulations of Chapter I of 36 CFR or pursuant to the terms and conditions of a specimen collection permit.

36 CFR §2.10 – Camping and Food Storage

(a) Camping is allowed in the following designated sites or areas and is subject to the following established conditions:

Definition: “Camping:” The erecting of a tent or shelter of natural or synthetic material, preparing a sleeping bag or other bedding material for use, parking of a motor vehicle, motor home or trailer, or mooring of a vessel for the apparent purpose of overnight occupancy.”
 

  • Mazama Campground and Lost Creek Campground are the only developed campgrounds.
  • A permit is required for camping at Mazama and Lost Creek Campgrounds.
  • Campsite fees, where charged, must be paid within one-half hour of arrival.
  • Camping in Mazama Campground and Lost Creek Campground is limited to 30 days each calendar year with no more than 14 consecutive days in any park campground.
  • The number of campers per site in Lost Creek Campground is limited to 8 persons. o
  • The number of campers per site in Mazama Campground is limited to 6 persons.
  • The number of vehicles per site in Mazama Campground and Lost Creek Campground is limited to 2 vehicles.
  • In sites where tent pads are provided, tents may be erected only on tent pads; otherwise tents and other camping equipment must be placed within 25 ft. of the site’s picnic table and/or fire pit.
  • Lost Creek Campground is closed to recreational vehicles, buses, and vehicles with trailers. Recreational vehicles are considered to be any conveyance specifically designed for camping and equipped with self-contained toilet facilities.
  • Quiet hours in Lost Creek Campground are between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m.
  • Quiet hours in Mazama Campground are between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m.
  • Generator use is prohibited at all times in Lost Creek Campground and is allowed between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. in Mazama Campground.

  • Backcountry camping is permitted in areas beyond one mile from any maintained road, subject to the following conditions and provided the site is not otherwise closed.
  • A permit is required for backcountry camping. Permits are free and available at the Steel Visitor Center or Park Backcountry Office in the Canfield Building. For Pacific Crest Trail through travelers that begin their trip outside the park, signing in at the north and south Pacific Crest Trail registers in lieu of obtaining a backcountry permit is allowed.
  • Backcountry camping is limited to 30 days each calendar year with no more than 14 consecutive days in the backcountry, or Lost Creek or Mazama campgrounds.
  • The maximum group size for backcountry camping is 8 persons. Larger groups must split up into smaller groups within these limits and must camp and eat at least 1/2 mile apart. Larger groups may request an exception to these limits from the Superintendent under the terms of a Special Use Permit. For permit information, please the park website at: https://www.nps.gov/crla/planyourvisit/permitsandreservations.htm
  • Backcountry camping is prohibited in the following areas:
– Within sight of hiking trails, ski trails/routes, or other camping parties, except when utilizing designated campsites at Lightning Spring, Dutton Creek, Bybee Creek, Red Cone Spring and Grouse Hill.

– Between Rim Drive and the caldera rim during the summer season and within 100 ft. of the caldera rim during the winter season.

– Within ¼ mile of Boundary Springs.

– Within ¼ mile of Sphagnum Bog.  Within ¼ mile of Thousand Springs

– At least 100 feet from any other flowing stream, spring, lake or other natural body of open water.

– At least 500 feet from any obvious cultural or archeological site.  Within 100 feet of any meadow (grassland) covered by less than one foot of snow.

– Within designated research natural areas.
 
Justification: Camping is an intensive use of park resources. All of the camping regulations are in effect to protect the natural and cultural resources of the park and the recreational enjoyment by other visitors. Limitations on the number of camping days, persons per site, etc. seek to achieve this protection while still providing an equitable allocation of camping opportunities.

(b)(3) Camping within 25 feet of a fire hydrant or main road, or within 100 feet of a flowing stream, river or body of water is prohibited, except in the following areas and under the following conditions:

• No exceptions exist.

(b)(7) Connecting to a utility system is prohibited, except as designated below:

  • No exceptions exists

(d) Conditions for the storage of food are in effect as designated below:

  • In all areas within the park, all food, lawfully taken fish, garbage and equipment used to store food, or has stored food in the past (e.g., ice chests) and food preparation must be stored in one of the following ways:
– Inside a vehicle with all doors, windows and trunk lids closed, OR
– Inside a camping unit that is constructed of solid non-pliable material, OR
– Suspended at least 10 feet above the ground and 4 feet horizontally from a post, tree trunk or other object, OR
– Inside a building, OR
– Inside a commercially available portable bear-resistant food storage container that is specifically designed and constructed to prevent access by bears and other wildlife, OR
– In developed campgrounds, inside a food storage locker where provided.

For purposes of this section, food is defined as items to be consumed, drinks, pet food, toiletries and soaps. Garbage is defined as food wastes, empty food containers, trash and recyclables. This restriction does not apply to food that is being transported, consumed or prepared for consumption
 

36 CFR §2.11 – Picnicking

Certain areas have been closed to picnicking and are listed in §1. 36 CFR 1.5(a)(1) Closures of this document.


36 CFR §2.12 – Audio Disturbances

(a)(2) Operating a power saw in developed areas is prohibited, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit.

(a)(3) Operating any type of portable motor or engine, or device powered by a portable motor or engine in nondeveloped areas is prohibited, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit.

(a)(4) Operating a public address system is prohibited, except in connection with a public gathering or special event for which a permit has been issued pursuant to §2.50 or §2.51

36 CFR 2.13 – Fires

(a)(1) The lighting or maintaining of fires is prohibited, except in the following areas and/or receptacles, and under the conditions noted:

 

Designated Areas:
  • Mazama Campground and Lost Creek Campground, in grills or grates provided in designated campsites.
  • Rim Village Picnic Area, in grills or grates provided in designated picnic sites

Receptacles Allowed:
  • Grills or grates that are provided in designated areas

Established Conditions for Fires: 
  • Fires must be fully contained within established fire grills or grates. No bonfires (large fires that  spill outside the fire receptacle, use stacks of highly flammable material such as cardboard boxes or wood pallets or have excessive flame heights that could easily become uncontrolled) are allowed.
  • Fires will be constantly monitored while burning and will be completely extinguished after use.
  • Self-contained gas and charcoal grills/stoves are allowed. Charcoal must be fully extinguished with water and removed from the park or disposed of in a garbage receptacle when cold.
  • Clearing of vegetation is prohibited. Upon departure all fires must be rendered completely out and cold by dowsing with water and all ashes must be widely scattered. Construction of fire rings is prohibited.
  • Backpacking stoves or camp stoves that utilize canisters (i.e. LPG, CNG, isobutene etc.,) and/or canisters of liquid fuel (i.e. white gas) are generally permitted. 
  • Backpacking stoves or camp stoves that utilize alcohol, solid fuel, gel/jelly fuel and/or wood may be prohibited. Check the park website https://www.nps.gov/crla/planyourvisit/permitsandreservations.htm for current restrictions. 

(a)(2) The following restrictions are in effect for the use of stoves or lanterns:

  • Check the park website https://www.nps.gov/crla/planyourvisit/permitsandreservations.htm for current restrictions. 

(b) Fires must be extinguished according to the following conditions:

  • All visual evidence of fires must be removed once extinguished, except in the following areas:
– Designated campsites at Mazama Campground and Lost Creek Campground.
– Designated picnic sites at Rim Village Picnic area.

Justification: Most of Crater Lake is not classified as a high fire danger environment, however local and temporary weather conditions may significantly increase fire danger. The use of ground fires; however, requires aggressive management due to the high probability of windblown hot coals or ash igniting combustible materials such as tents, vehicles and vegetation. Allowing open fires only in existing fire enclosures, grills, or fire grates that have been provided by the park helps to control human-caused fires. Restricting fires also serves to deter the illegal collection of sparse native vegetation. Persons desiring to use portable gas or charcoal grills do not compromise park management concerns when procedures for proper disposal of ashes/coals are followed

(c) During periods of high fire danger, the following areas of the park are closed to the lighting 
or maintaining of a fire.
 

36 CFR §2.14 – Sanitation and Refuse

 

(a)(2) Using park refuse receptacles or facilities for dumping household, commercial or industrial refuse is prohibited, except under the following conditions:

  • Household trash generated by authorized camping activities may be placed in receptacles designed for that purpose in developed campgrounds. In all other instances, the dumping of commercial, household (generated by unauthorized camping), or industrial refuse, brought in from private or municipal property, in government receptacles is prohibited

(a)(5) Bathing or washing food, clothing, dishes, or other property at public water outlets, fixtures, or pools is prohibited, except at the following outlets, fixtures, or pools designated for such purposes:

  • No designated areas. Unless otherwise allowed by the Superintendent, bathing and washing of cooking utensils, food and other property at all public water outlets, fixtures, or pools is prohibited. Washing of dishes in campgrounds is restricted to any provided waste disposal sinks or should be accomplished through the use of dish pans or buckets at the campsite. Gray water should be captured and disposed of in any provided waste sinks, drains or in toilets

(a)(7) Disposing of fish remains on land or in waters within 200 feet of boat docks or designated swimming beaches or within developed areas is prohibited, except as designated below:

  • No exceptions exists.

(a)(8) In developed areas, the disposal of human body waste is prohibited, except at the following designated locations or fixtures provided for that purpose:

  • Human body waste, other than used diapers or toilet paper, is prohibited from being placed within park trash cans or dumpsters and must be disposed of in park restroom facilities or the RV dump station at Mazama Campground.
  • Human waste contained is bags specifically designed to collect, contain, neutralize and decay human waste are permitted to be placed in park trash receptacles.
Justification: Human body waste can be a significant hazard to other persons, wildlife and the environment. Proper disposal is necessary to prevent the unintentional spread of disease or harmful microorganism

(a)(9) In nondeveloped areas, the disposal of human body waste within 10 feet of a water source, high water mark of a body of water, or a campsite, or within sight of a trail is prohibited, except as designated below:

  • In backcountry and other undeveloped areas the disposal of human body waste shall be prohibited within 100 feet of any water source, developed trail, or designated backcountry campsite. Human waste and toilet paper must be buried in a hole at least 6 inches deep in mineral soil

(b) Conditions for the disposal, containerization, or carryout of human body waste have been established as follows:

  • Human body waste, other than used diapers or toilet paper, is prohibited from being placed within park trash cans or dumpsters and must be disposed of in park restroom facilities or the RV dump station at Mazama Campground.
  • Human waste contained is bags specifically designed to collect, contain, neutralize and decay human waste are permitted to be placed in park trash receptacles
 

36 CFR §2.15 – Pets

NOTE: Service animals are not subject to the park’s pet policies and, when accompanying an individual with a disability, they are allowed wherever visitors are allowed. A service animal means any dog or miniature horse that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual or other mental disability.

(a)(1) Possessing pets in public buildings, public transportation vehicles, swimming beaches, and the following structures and/or areas is prohibited:

  • All trails (This includes hiking trails and designated ski trails/routes) within the park, with the exceptions listed below:
– Pets on a leash of not more than 6 ft. in length are allowed on the following trails and in the following areas, under the specified conditions:
  • Lady of the Woods Trail near the Steel Visitor Center.
  • Godfrey Glen Trail on Munson Valley Road.
  • Grayback Road from Vidae Falls Picnic Area to Lost Creek Campground.
  • Leashed pets are also allowed on the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) and the Annie Springs Spur Trail that connects the PCT to Mazama Village at Munson Valley Road. Pets are not allowed on any other trails connecting to the PCT or on the Crater Lake Rim Trail outside of Rim Village. During the winter, pets are allowed on the PCT and Annie Springs Spur Trail, which are designated ski trails, so long as the leash requirements and the conditions below are met:
  • Hikers/skiers on these trails with pets must abide by the following conditions:
– Hikers/skiers may only be in possession of one leashed pet per person.
– Hikers/skiers with pets on these trails must yield by stepping off the side of the trail and controlling their pet at their side whenever meeting other hikers/skiers without pets.
– Hikers with pets on the PCT must also step off the side of the trail controlling their pet at their side whenever meeting stock users.
– PCT hikers/skiers with pets must keep their pets leashed at all times when in the park including when camping.
– Hikers/skiers with pets on these trails must clean up solid pet excrement and dispose of it in trash receptacles. PCT hikers may either remove solid excrement from the park or bury it at least 6 inches deep in mineral soil as with human feces at least 100 feet from any water source, developed trail, or designated backcountry campsite.
  • Any area greater than 50 feet from a road, established parking area, developed campground or designated picnic area.
  • “Road” includes both “park roads” and roads outside the park that abut the park boundary.
  • “Established parking area” includes the winter snow park area on North Entrance Road at the intersection with Highway 138.
  • All National Park Service buildings and facilities identified as closed to the public in §1.5(a)(1). This does not apply to residents of park housing.
  • Pets are also prohibited from entering Crater Lake, all streams, and any body of water within the park.
  • Designated ski trails/routes closed to pets are:
– Rim Drive (including avalanche bypasses)
– Lightning Springs Trail
– Pumice Flat Trail
– Raven Trail
– Dutton Creek Trail
– Hemlock Loop
– Mazama Campground Trail
– Crater Peak Trail

(a)(3) Leaving a pet unattended and tied to an object is prohibited, except in the following areas and/or under the following conditions:

  • No exceptions exist.

(a)(5) Pet excrement must be disposed of in accordance with the following conditions:

  • All solid pet excrement must be immediately picked up by the owner or person in control of the pet and disposed of in solid waste/trash receptacles except hikers/skiers on the PCT which may either remove solid excrement from the park or bury it at least 6 inches deep in mineral soil as with human feces at least 100 feet from any water source, developed trail, or designated backcountry campsite.
Justification: Since pets are usually concentrated in the campgrounds and public areas of Crater Lake N.P., excrement must be removed to prevent health hazards to people and to lessen negative impact on wildlife. Consistent with public health and safety, protection of natural resources and avoidance of conflict among visitor use activities, pets must be restricted. Pets are not considered compatible with the broad park goal of minimal resource impact or inherently suitable for adapting quickly to a strange environment often involving close association with strange persons and animals. It is recognized that pets are a common possession of park visitors, and provisions are made for them where they do not jeopardize basic park values. Dogs in particular may chase wildlife, pollute water sources and can become defensive and dangerous in strange surroundings. The burden is placed on pet owners to assure their pets do not destroy park values for other people in areas where pets are allowed. Resident employees are subject to these regulations and may keep pets only in accordance with the park’s pet policy.

(e) Pets may be kept by park residents under the following conditions:

  • See CRLA Housing Policy.

36 CFR §2.16 – Horses and Pack Animals

 

(a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting equipment is prohibited. The following animals are designated as pack animals for purposes of transporting equipment:

  • Horses
  • Mules
  • Burros
  • Llamas

(b) The use of horses or pack animals is prohibited outside of the following trails, routes or areas designated for their use:

  • Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), excluding the Rim Trail alternate route. The Rim Trail alternate route begins at the PCT/Dutton Creek Trail Junction, and includes the Dutton Creek Trail to Rim Village, the West Rim Trail from Rim Village to North Junction, and the trail from North Junction to the PCT in the Grouse Hill area.
  • Bybee Creek stock camp and access trail.
  • Bald Crater Loop Trail.
  • Bald Crater Loop west access trail.
  • Stuart Falls Spur Trail.
  • Lightning Springs Trail from the Pacific Crest Trail to a hitching post ¼ mile from Rim Drive.
  • Grayback Road

(d) Free-trailing or loose-herding of horses or pack animals on trails is prohibited, except as designated below:

  • No exceptions exist.

(g) Other conditions concerning the use of horses or pack animals:
  • Grazing, free-ranging, the use or transport of hay, straw or seed-type feeds is prohibited within the park.
  • Stock users must carry sufficient pellet feed for their stock to use while in the park. All such feed must be certified weed-free.
  • Stock users should feed their animals certified weed-free feed for several days prior to coming to the park to reduce the risk of introducing seeds of non-native plants into the park.
  • Maximum group size is 8 persons and 12 head of stock. Larger groups may request an exception to these limits from the Superintendent under the terms of a Special Use Permit. For permit information, please visit the park website at: https://www.nps.gov/crla/planyourvisit/permitsandreservations.htm
  • Overnight stock use is allowed only at the Bybee Creek Stock Camp.
  • Stock users must use hitch racks provided or, if unavailable, high line picketing, while stock is not in use.
  • Stock shall not be tied or picketed within 100 feet of a water source.
  • Stock manure piles must be raked, spread or otherwise dispersed before leaving an area.
  • Manure piles shall be removed from Trailheads and parking areas.
  • Horse trailers may not be cleaned out within the park.
Justification: The recreational use of horses and pack animals is well established in the park. Restrictions on animal type, watering, numbers and locations for stock use are necessary to: 1) Protect the soil, vegetation and water quality from unacceptable damage, 2) Protect public health concerns and 3) Avoid conflict among visitor use activities. The use of certified weed-free feed is required in order to minimize the introduction of non-native plant life.
 

36 CFR §2.17 – Aircraft and Air Delivery

(a)(3) Delivering or retrieving a person or object by parachute, helicopter, or other airborne
means is prohibited, except in emergencies involving public safety or serious property loss or pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit.

(c)(1) The removal of a downed aircraft, components, or parts thereof is subject to procedures established by the Superintendent.

  • Terms and conditions for removal of downed aircraft, components and parts shall be specified on a case by case basis, by permit.

36 CFR §2.18 – Snowmobiles

(c) The use of snowmobiles is prohibited, except on routes designated in 36 C.F.R Part 7.2(c)

  • On the North Entrance Road from its intersection with the Rim Drive to the park boundary, and on intermittent routes detouring from the North Entrance Road as designated by the Superintendent and marked with snow poles and signs. Except for such designated detours marked with snow poles and signs, only that portion of the North Entrance Road intended for wheeled vehicle use may be used by snowmobiles. Such roadway is available for snowmobile use only when the designated roadway is closed to motor vehicles used by the public.

36 CFR §2.19 – Winter Activities

(a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding, innertubing, tobogganing, and similar winter sports are prohibited on park roads and in parking areas open to motor vehicle traffic, except under the conditions below:

  • No exceptions exist.

(b) The towing of persons on skis, sleds, or other sliding devices by motor vehicle or
snowmobile is prohibited, except in the following areas and/or routes:

  • No exceptions exist.

36 CFR §2.20 – Skating, Skateboards and similar Devices

Using roller skates, skateboards, roller skis, coasting vehicles, or similar devices is prohibited, except in the following designated areas:

  • Roller skates, skateboards, roller skis and coasting vehicles are permitted only on paved roadways in Park residential housing areas.

36 CFR §2.21 – Smoking

(a) The following portions of the park, buildings, structures and/or facilities are closed to smoking as noted:

 

  • The smoking of cigarettes, cigars, pipes and the use of E-Cigarettes or Vapor Cigarettes or similar devices if prohibited as follows:

– In all buildings, including restrooms, except National Park Service residential buildings.
– On the Cleetwood trail, the Cleetwood boat dock and docking facilities.
– Within 100 yards of any fueling system.
– On the Wizard Island boat dock and boathouse facilities.
– On all National Park Service and concession operated watercraft.
– Within 25 feet of any entrances, exits, windows that open and ventilation intakes that serve an enclosed area of any public building

Justification: This prohibition is necessary to reduce the risk of fire in historic
public use buildings, reduce the risk of fire associated with boat fueling
operations, reduce the health hazards of secondhand smoke or other
harmful substances to visitors, and prevent conflicts between smokers and
nonsmokers.
 

  • Smoking while hiking or riding in the backcountry:
– Persons who wish to smoke must stop and remain in one location until they have extinguished their smoking material. All smoking material must be packed out and disposed of in an appropriate trash receptacle.
– Smoking may be restricted to specific areas, or prohibited while fire restrictions are in place. Specific details will be in public announcements.

Justification: Smoking, while traveling on trails, is prohibited due to the
resulting fire danger. Ashes and embers inadvertently dropped while walking
or while riding an animal have the potential to start a fire that may go
unnoticed in its initial stages. Requiring persons to remain in one location
minimizes this risk.
 

36 CFR §2.22 – Property

(a)(2) Leaving property unattended for longer than 24 hours is prohibited, except in the following locations or under the following conditions:

  • Visitors with valid backcountry permits may leave vehicles unattended at locations, during time periods and under conditions specified on their permit.

36 CFR §2.23 – Recreation Fees

(b) Recreation fees and/or permits, in accordance with 36 CFR part 71, are established for the following areas and/or for the use of the following specialized sites, facilities, equipment or services, or for participation in the following group activity, recreation events or specialized recreation uses:

 

Entrance Fee Areas:
  • Fees are required for entrance into Crater Lake National Park via the Annie Springs Entrance Station or North Entrance Station. When entrance stations are unattended, entrance fees shall be paid at the Backcountry Office, located in the Canfield Building.
  • Entrance fees are not required for travel through the park on Highway 62.

  • No Day Site Use Fee exist

Special Recreation Permit Fee (Such as but not limited to, group activities, recreation events, and the use of motorized recreation vehicles):
  • Camping fees are required for occupancy of campsites at Lost Creek
 

36 CFR §2.35 – Alcoholic Beverages and Controlled Substances

(a)(3)(i) The following areas and facilities within the park are closed to consumption of alcoholic beverages, and/or to the possession of a bottle, can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose seal has been broken or the contents of which have been partially removed:

  • Rim Visitor Center (Kaiser Studio)
  • Rim Village Community House
  • Sinnott Memorial
  • Sager Building
  • Steel Visitor Center
  • Canfield Building
  • NPS Maintenance Building
  • Natural Resources/Fire Management Building (aka Rat Hall)
  • NPS Warehouse including SAR cache and Wildland Fire Cache
  • NPS Trail Crew CacheNPS Maintenance Yard, adjacent parking areas and open storage area unless this area is
  • open to the public as overflow parking as permitted by the Superintendent.
  • All other NPS Service Yards - Old Ball field, Pole Creek, South Yard, etc.
Justification: These areas are public visitor centers and National Park Service administrative buildings and work areas. The consumption and possession of open containers of alcohol are inconsistent with the mission of the National Park Service.

36 CFR §2.37 – Noncomercial Soliciting

Soliciting or demanding gifts, money, goods or services is prohibited except pursuant to the terms and conditions or a permit that has been issued under §2.50, §2.51, or §2.52.

36 CFR §2.38 – Explosives

(a) Using, possessing, storing, or transporting explosives, blasting agents or explosive materials is prohibited, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit.

(b) Using, or possessing fireworks and firecrackers is prohibited, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit or in designated areas under the following conditions:

  • No designated areas exist

36 CFR §2.50 – Special Events

(a) Sports events, pageants, regattas, public spectator attractions, entertainments, ceremonies, and similar events are allowed, provided there is a meaningful association between the park area and the events, and the observance contributes to visitor understanding of the significance of the park area, and a permit therefor has been issued by the superintendent.

36 CFR §2.51 -- Demonstrations

 

(b) Demonstrations of more than 25 people are allowed within park areas designated as available under paragraph (c)(2) when the superintendent has issued a permit for the activity.

NOTE: Demonstrations involving 25 persons or fewer may be held without a permit in designated park areas, provided that the requirements in §2.51(b) are met. The 25 person maximum for the small group permit exception may be reduced pursuant to §2.51(b)(3)

(c)(2) The following locations are designated as available for demonstrations (see attached maps in the Appendix):

  • Mazama Store parking lot: limited to an area 30 feet by 70 feet on the south side of the paved parking area across from the Mazama Store.
  • Sager Building: limited to 70 feet of the paved sidewalk in front of the building and parallel to the parking lot. This area is located 10 feet south of the intersection of the parking lot sidewalk and the entrance sidewalk. This does not include the walkway and steps leading into the building, nor to the intersection of that walkway and the parking lot or sidewalk.
  • Rim Village: the paved sidewalk between the Rim Village Community House sidewalk intersection and the Rim Village Picnic Area road intersection. This sidewalk is across from the Rim Visitor Center on the south side of the parking lot.
  • Rim Village Picnic Area: the unnumbered and unnamed site shown on the attached map.
  • Mazama Campground amphitheater: only when such activity is not in conflict with scheduled National Park Service use or use by a permitted group for a special event.

For permit information, please visit the park website at: https://www.nps.gov/crla/planyourvisit/permitsandreservations.htm
 

36 CFR §2.52 -- Sale or Distribution of Printed Matter

(b) The sale or distribution of printed matter by more than 25 persons is allowed within park areas designated as available under §2.51(c)(2) (see above) when the superintendent has issued a permit.

36 CFR §2.60 – Livestock Use and Agriculture

(a) Livestock are generally prohibited in any park area. They are only permitted in park areas pursuant to the exceptions provided for in §2.60(a) and only pursuant to the terms and conditions of a license, permit, or lease.

36 CFR §2.61 – Residing on Federal Lands

(a) Residing in park areas, other than on privately owned lands, is prohibited except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit lease or contract.

36 CFR §2.62 – Memorialization

(a) The installation of a monument, memorial, tablet, structure, or other commemorative installation in a park area without the authorization of the Director is prohibited.

(b) The scattering of human ashes from cremation is prohibited, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit, or in the following areas and according to the following conditions:

36 CFR §3.3 – Vessel Permits

  • This section is superseded by 36 CFR §7.2(b). No private vessel or motor may be used on the waters of the park.

36 CFR §3.7 – Personal Floatation Device (PFD) Requirements

  • The Superintendent requires that a PFD be worn or carried at all times and on all waters during boating activities.

36 CFR §3.8 – Boating Operations

(a)(2) Launching or operating a vessel is prohibited, except at one of the following launch sites:

  • No exceptions exist.

(a)(4) Vessels must meet the length, width, or horsepower conditions outlined in §1.5 of this document.

(b)(3) Operating a vessel in excess of flat wake speed is prohibited in the following areas:

  • No areas exist.

(b)(5) Operating a power-driven or sailing vessel within 500 feet of a shoreline designated as a swimming beach is prohibited, except for in the following locations:

  • No exceptions exist.
Vessel means every description of watercraft, or other artificial contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of transportation on the water. This includes paddle boards. This definition does not apply to a seaplane on the water.

36 CFR §3.14 Removing a Sunken, Grounded, or Disabled Vessel

(a) The removal of a vessel and its cargo must be done in accordance with the following established procedures:

  • The Superintendent will establish on a case by case basis the procedures for the owners or authorized salvager of a sunken, grounded, or disabled vessel to remove the vessel, all component parts and equipment, and all associated cargo.

36 CFR §3.16 – Swimming and Wading

Swimming or wading is allowed in waters, subject to closures or restrictions designated in §1.5 of this document.

36 CFR §3.17 – Swimming Areas and Beaches

(a) Swimming areas and swimming beaches are designated in §1.5 of this document.

(c) Prohibitions on the use or possession of flotation devices, glass containers, kites, or incompatible activities in swimming areas or swimming beaches are outlined in §1.5 of this document.

36 CFR §3.18 – Scuba and Snorkeling

(a) Snorkeling and underwater diving is allowed in park waters, subject to the closures or restrictions designated in §1.5 of this document.

  • Snorkeling and underwater diving is currently prohibited within Crater Lake as designated by an emergency closure issued by the Superintendent except for administrative and research/management purposes approved by the Superintendent. See information under general closures §1.5 above.

36 CFR §3.19 – Use of Submersibles

The use of manned or unmanned submersibles may only occur in accordance with a permit issued by the superintendent.

36 CFR §4.10 – Travel on Park Roads and Routes

(c)(1) Operating a motor vehicle not equipped with pneumatic tires is prohibited, except that a track-laying motor vehicle or a motor vehicle equipped with a similar traction device may be operated on one of the following routes designated for these vehicles:

  • No exceptions exist.

36 CFR §4.11 – Vehicle Load, Weight, and Size Limits

(a) The following load, weight and size limits, which are more restrictive than State law, apply to the roads indicated under the terms and conditions, and/or under permit as noted:

  • No exceptions exist

36 CFR §4.21 – Speed Limits

(a), (b) The following speed limits are established for the routes/roads indicated:

 

(a), (b) The following speed limits are established for the routes/roads indicated:

  • North Entrance Road (Route 10), from highway 138 to ¼ mile north of the North Entrance Station: 45 miles per hour.
  • North Entrance Road (Route 10), from ¼ mile north of the North Entrance Station to ¼ mile south of the North Entrance Station: 25 miles per hour.
  • North Entrance Road (Route 10), from ¼ mile south of the North Entrance Station to ¼ mile north of North Junction: 45 miles per hour.
  • North Entrance Road (Route 10), from ¼ mile north of North Junction to North Junction: 35 miles per hour.
  • East Rim Drive (Route 500), from North Junction to ¼ mile west of Cleetwood Cove parking lot: 35 miles per hour.
  • East Rim Drive (Route 500), from ¼ mile west of Cleetwood Cove parking lot to ¼ mile east of Cleetwood Cove parking lot: 20 miles per hour.
  • East Rim Drive (Route 500), from ¼ mile east of Cleetwood Cove parking lot to ¾ mile south of Munson Valley Road junction: 35 miles per hour.
  • East Rim Drive (Route 500), from ¾ mile south of Munson Valley Road junction to Munson Valley Road junction: 25 miles per hour.
  • Cloudcap Overlook Road (Route 201), from East Rim Drive to Cloudcap Overlook: 35 miles per hour.
  • Pinnacles Road (Route 100), from Kerr Notch to ¼ mile north of Lost Creek Campground: 35 miles per hour.
  • Pinnacles Road (Route 100), from ¼ mile north of Lost Creek Campground to ¼ mile south of Lost Creek Campground: 20 miles per hour.
  • Pinnacles Road (Route 100), from ¼ mile south of Lost Creek Campground to ¼ mile north of Pinnacles Overlook: 35 miles per hour.
  • Pinnacles Road (Route 100), from ¼ mile north of Pinnacles Overlook to Pinnacles Overlook: 20 miles per hour.
  • Grayback Road (no route number), from Lost Creek Campground to Vidae Falls: 25 miles per hour.
  • Munson Valley Road (Route 12), from East Rim Drive junction to ¼ mile north of East Rim Drive junction: 25 miles per hour.
  • Munson Valley Road (Route 12), from ¼ mile north of East Rim Drive junction to ¼ mile south of West Rim Drive junction: 35 miles per hour.
  • Munson Valley Road (Route 12), from ¼ mile south of West Rim Drive junction to Crater Lake Lodge/Rim Dormitory: 15 miles per hour.
  • West Rim Drive (Route 10), from Munson Valley Road junction to North Junction: 35 miles per hour. Munson Valley Road (Route 12), from junction with East Rim Drive to ¼ mile south of junction with East Rim Drive: 25 miles per hour.
  • Munson Valley Road (Route 12), from ¼ mile south of junction with East Rim Drive to ¼ mile north of Annie Springs Entrance Station: 45 miles per hour.
  • Munson Valley Road (Route 12), from ¼ mile north of Annie Springs Entrance Station to Highway 62 junction: 25 miles per hour.
  • South Highway 62 (Route 11), from Munson Valley Road junction to ½ mile south of Munson Valley Road junction: 35 miles per hour.
  • Highway 62 (Route 11), all other areas within the boundaries of Crater Lake National Park (unless otherwise designated in this compendium or 36 CFR 4.21): 45 miles per hour.

Snowmobile speed limits on North Entrance Road:

  • North Entrance Road (Route 10), from highway 138 to ¼ mile north of the North Entrance Station: 45 miles per hour.
  • North Entrance Road (Route 10), from ¼ mile north of the North Entrance Station to ¼ mile south of the North Entrance Station: 25 miles per hour.
  • North Entrance Road (Route 10), from ¼ mile south of the North Entrance Station to the Pacific Crest Trailhead: 45 miles per hour.
  • North Entrance Road (Route 10), from the Pacific Crest Trailhead where it crosses North Entrance Road to North Junction: 35 miles per hour.
 

36 CFR §4.30 – Bicycles

(a) Park roads. The use of bicycles and electric bicycles are permitted on park roads and in parking areas that are otherwise open for motor vehicle use by the general public. Park roads and parking areas that are closed to bicycle use are listed in §1.5 of this document.

The following additional routes, in developed areas or special use zones, have been designated for bicycle and electric bicycle use:

  • Rim Drive and North Entrance Road, during those seasonal periods when the road is snow free and closed to motor vehicles. Bicycles and electric bicycles may be used anytime motor vehicles are allowed as well.
  • Grayback Road
Determination: Bicycles are allowed on park roads and in parking areas under 36 CFR 4.30(a). On September 24, 2021, the Superintendent designated park roads and parking areas and the Grayback administrative road as open to electric bicycles using the discretionary authority given to the Superintendent under 36 CFR 4.30(i). Allowing electric bicycles on public roads and in parking areas and along Grayback Road will create new opportunities for recreation and access within the park. It will not create any adverse impacts to park visitors, resources or values due to the existing use of these locations by motor vehicles and bicycles.
Justification: Rim Drive and North Entrance Road, when it is snow free either after or prior to its winter closure, can be safely used by bicycles and electric bicycles before it has been plowed to a width that is safe for public motor vehicle traffic. Bicycle and electric bicycle use during these periods is consistent with visitor enjoyment of park resources and does not create adverse impacts to park resources. Bicycle and electric bicycle use in the park is encouraged as an activity that is appropriate and consistent with park management objectives.

Grayback Road (also known as Grayback Drive) is an historic roadway originally designed for automobile travel. It is maintained as an administrative access road and has been established as a multiple use roadway, closed to public automobile travel but open to hiking, horseback riding and bicyclesand administrative automobiles. This gets limited use by all user groups and no known user conflicts exist. The impacts of bicycles and electric bicycles to the natural resources on this administrative road is insignificant and bicycleand electric bicycle use in the park is encouraged as an activity that is appropriate and consistent with park management objectives.

(d)(3) Riding a bicycle abreast of another rider is allowed on the following routes:

  • No exceptions exist.

36 CFR §4.31 – Hitching

Hitchhiking or soliciting transportation is permitted in the following designated areas:

  • Where vehicles may safely pull off of the main traffic lane into a pullout or safely onto the shoulder to allow for the passengers to be received safely.
  • Hitchhikers shall use trailheads, parking areas or turnouts.

and must comply with the following conditions:

  • The hitchhiker must stay off paved surface of roadway and not obstruct traffic.
  • Signs must be 1' by 2' in size or smaller.
  • May not occur during the hours of darkness.
  • May not occur while under the influence of alcohol or intoxicating drugs in accordance with 36 C.F.R 2.35(c).
  • May not occur when hitchhiking behavior is deemed unsafe or a nuisance by Park Staff.
Justification: The superintendent has determined that hitchhiking will be allowed in the park so long as those individuals seeking a ride follow the above safety guidelines and do not obstruct traffic or harass other park visitors. Hitchhiking is allowed to provide a means for hikers to return to their vehicles or to/from trailheads.

36 CFR §5.1 – Advertisements

Commercial notices or advertisements shall not be displayed, posted, or distributed on federally owned or controlled lands within a park area unless prior written permission has been given by the Superintendent.

36 CFR §5.3 – Business Operations

Engaging in or soliciting any business in park areas, except in accordance with the provisions of a permit, contract, or other written agreement with the United States, except as such may be specifically authorized under special regulations applicable to a park area, is prohibited.

36 CFR §5.4 – Commercial Passenger-Carrying Motor Vehicles

(a) The commercial transportation of passengers by motor vehicle except as authorized under a contract or permit from the Secretary or his authorized representative is prohibited in certain parks. See §5.4(a) for more information.

36 CFR §5.5 – Commercial Photography

(a) Before any motion picture may be filmed or any television production or sound track may
be made by any person other than bona fide newsreel or news television personnel, a written permit must first be obtained from the Superintendent.

(b)Taking photographs of any vehicle or other articles of commerce or models for the purpose of commercial advertising without a written permit from the Superintendent is prohibited.

36 CFR §5.6 – Commercial Vehicles

(b) & (c) Using commercial vehicles on government roads within park areas when such use is in no way connected with the operation of the park is generally prohibited, and requires permission or a permit from the Superintendent.

36 CFR §5.7 – Construction of Buildings or Facilities

Such activities are prohibited, except in accordance with the provisions of a valid permit,
contract, or other written agreement with the United States.

36 CFR §5.10 – Eating, Drinking, or Lodging Establishments

(a) In certain parks, establishments offering food, drink, or lodging for sale on privately owned lands may only be operated with a permit from the Superintendent. See §5.10 for more information.

36 CFR §7.2 Special Regulations

(a) Fishing. Fishing in Crater Lake and park streams is permitted from May 20 through October 31.
(b) Boating. No private vessel or motor may be used on the waters of the park.
(c) On the North Entrance Road from its intersection with the Rim Drive to the park boundary, and on intermittent routes detouring from the North Entrance Road as designated by the Superintendent and marked with snow poles and signs. Except for such designated detours marked with snow poles and signs, only that portion of the North Entrance Road intended for wheeled vehicle use may be used by snowmobiles. Such roadway is available for snowmobile use only when the designated roadway is closed to motor vehicles used by the public.
 

PUBLIC NOTICE: Security Camera Monitoring

In accordance with National Park Service (NPS) Law Enforcement Reference Manual 9 (RM-9), notice is hereby given that Crater Lake National Park uses Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) security camera monitoring.

The NPS’s use of CCTV for law enforcement and security purposes and will only be to visually monitor public park areas and public activities where no constitutionally protected reasonable expectation of privacy exists. Such CCTV use – which will have adequate privacy and First Amendment safeguards – will be to help ensure public safety and security; facilitate the detection, investigation, prevention, and deterrence of terrorist activity; help ensure the safety of citizens and officers; help assist in the proper allocation and deployment of law enforcement and public safety resources; and help facilitate the protection of the innocent and the apprehension and prosecution of criminals.

This policy does not restrict the official use of CCTV in government administrative areas, including administrative buildings, jail holding facilities, revenue collection sites, etc., where the government may record/monitor its facilities. For example, the government may perform unrestricted video/audio recording at revenue collection points (entrance stations, visitor center counters, etc.). This policy does not restrict the use of an Audio/Visual Recording Device (AVRD) in patrol vehicles or officerworn recording devices used by commissioned rangers.

Operation of CCTV cameras will be in accordance with NPS and Department policy. No person will be targeted or monitored merely because of race, religion, gender, sex, disability, national origin, or political affiliation or views.

Nothing in this policy statement is intended to create any rights, privileges, or benefits not otherwise recognized by law.


APPENDIX
Areas Open for Demonstrations and Sale or Distribution of Printed Matter
36 CFR 2.51 (c)(2) and 36 CFR 2.52 (b)
 
A partial road map of Crater Lake National Park with two blue dots on Munson Valley Road and two blue dots in Rim Village indicate the general areas for First Amendment Rights. Map and park locations not significant to the free speech areas are shaded.
 
A map of Mazama Village, campground and parking area. Roads are white. Buildings are brown. Blue dots in Mazama Store Parking lot and at Mazama Campground Amphitheater mark First Amendment Areas. Related text in lower left corner.
 
Map of park headquarters area. Munson Valley Road is black with broken yellow stripe. Secondary roads are white. Eight buildings are brown. An area in blue near Sager Building shows the First Admentment area. Related text in lower right corner.
 
Map of Rim Village. Roads are white. Five buildings are brown. A dashed line is the Rim Village Promenade. A long blue area and a blue-filled circle show the locations of First Amendment Areas for free speech.
 
 

Last updated: November 2, 2022

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