Description of Site and Buildings

APPENDIX B: DESCRIPTION OF SITE AND BUILDINGS


In 1994, approximately 110 acres of the North Truro Air Force Station were conveyed to the National Park Service. The Landscape Site Plan illustrates the existing built environment and anticipated site improvements. NPS has already initiated site improvements such as the installation of native plantings, outdoor seating, safety lighting, murals, sculptural works, an ocean-viewing platform, and interpretive panels. Program Partners will further the development of the site by rehabilitating and retrofitting buildings individually and jointly.

Buildings
Of the 57 buildings at the site, 25-45 buildings are in use or are slated for reuse. The total building inventory of the site is approximately 115,000 square feet. The Environmental Assessment prepared by the NPS proposed demolition of approximately 24,000 square feet of residential and other structures, leaving a significant inventory of remaining available buildings. Detailed inventories of building condition have been conducted by the NPS to identify structural problems, hazardous materials, and other material and site issues. NPS national policies permit leasing of existing buildings on this site, which could enable designated Program Partners to rehabilitate structures in conformance with NPS guidelines, which require a scale and character of rehabilitation that will be similar to the current building stock, as well as incorporation of features that will encourage green redevelopment and building sustainability. NPS policies do not generally allow new construction on the part of its Program Partners.

Utilities

The NPS has been working to incrementally achieve infrastructure upgrades. In 2007, initial water, fire suppression, electrical, and wastewater system improvements were completed for buildings in the main quadrangle area, reactivating major portions of existing systems. The overhead electric utility system was largely repaired in 2010. The NPS has submitted funding requests for additional upgrades to these systems, including sliplining of existing water pipes. Tenants will be responsible for utility hook-ups to existing services, and possibly for added capital utility systems if more federal funds do not become available.

NPS installed a Title 5 sewage disposal system designed to accommodate the early stages of redevelopment at the Highlands Center. The system includes a pumping station and septic tank located east of Building T5, and a new subsurface disposal field located at the east of the site near Buildings 22 and 23. The capacity of the Phase I system is 5,000 gallons per day. Wastewater treatment adequate to serve the redevelopment of the entire site may require a central wastewater treatment plant. (According to NPS, projected funds could provide for water and electrical improvements and a second 5,000 gallon system only.) Achievement of full site redevelopment potential as defined by early studies of Highlands Center will require either external funding for such a site-wide wastewater system or implementation of highly innovative means of wastewater treatment, such as solar aquatics systems, rainwater harvesting, greywater systems, composting toilets, or other measures that can reduce the quantity of wastewater treated. Such an innovative system would require the concurrence of state regulators and may pose an implementation challenge to realizing the full potential of the site. Alternative technologies and low-tech composting and rainwater harvesting methods will be utilized to reduce demands on the system.

The NPS is keenly interested in implementing renewable energy improvements at the site. Although a wind feasibility study was effectively dismissed by the Federal Aviation Administration, future technological advances could permit future wind turbine possibilities. A Solar Assessment was completed by Boreal Renewable Development, identifying suitable building and ground-mounted photovoltaic system opportunities; initial cost estimating was also supplied. As occupancy levels at the Highlands Center campus increase, integration of solar, combined heat and power, and zero net energy concepts will be highly desired.

Hazardous Materials

The U.S. Air Force undertook some intensive environmental remediation work extending into the early 1990s documented in 1994 in the U.S. Air Force and Army Corps Environmental Baseline Survey for North Truro Air Force Station. The report documents the processes used by the Department of Defense to identify and abate known friable asbestos, underground storage tanks, and PCB transformers; no known fuel or pesticide contamination was disclosed. Since then, the NPS became aware of additional potential residual contamination. For instance, some areas were not studied and hazardous materials were discovered in the old sewer system pipes. In 1997, the sewer system was remediated by the Air Force, but some issues have not been addressed by the Department of Defense, although remediation assistance requests have been sent to the Air Force. The NPS clarifies that it will not require that potential partners be responsible for site remediation activity.

Hazardous building materials investigations were completed for the NPS in 2000 and 2001. Code requirement and structural repair needs were identified, and some sampling results revealed lead- and asbestos-containing hazardous building materials, while other materials were lead and asbestos free. Partners will be responsible for remediation of hazardous building materials as part of applicable building rehabilitation projects if hazardous substances would be disturbed.

Housing

Rooms and suites could be made available to staff or program participants with varying lengths of stay to support Program Partner activities. It is important to identify if the use of these housing units is integral to a potential partner's proposal. The nature of projected use is also requested, e.g. desire for exclusivity, shared versus dedicated units, year-round or seasonal use and projected fluctuations. Shared or communal use facilities could be provided by Program Partners and submissions for their use will be accepted.

 
A grayscale map looking down on a grid of streets, and a series of rectangular buildings.
Map of the Highlands Center.

Summary of Key Information on Specific Buildings


The following list summarizes the buildings that comprise the Highlands Center. Some initial exploration has been done to illustrate the upgrade needs and costs associated with a variety of potential end uses. This list is purely illustrative. No definitive conclusions have been made about building reuse.

Quadrangle and Programatic Buildings


Building Numbers: 9, 10, 11, 12
Original Name: Administration/Dormitory 33, 35, 37, 39 Old Dewline Road
Estimated Year of Construction: 1951
Square Footage: 5,780 each
# of Floors: 2 each
# of Rooms: 24 each

History and Illustrative Reuse: Located on the quadrangle, these buildings were used as the Headquarters/Administration Building and as a Dormitory. Analyses of possible uses of these buildings have determined that they could be used as a dormitory, warehouse-style accommodations, studio/lab workspace, and office space.

Building Number: 15
Original Name: Bowling Alley 34 Old Dewline Road
Estimated Year of Construction: 1961
Square Footage: 1,987 # of Floors: 1
# of Rooms: 4

History and Illustrative Reuse: Building 15 was originally used as a two-lane bowling alley. Small in size with minimal fenestration, this building is suitable for recreation, assembly, and exhibit or studio space.

Building Number: 16
Original Name: Recreation/Multi-Purpose 41 Old Dewline Road
Estimated Year of Construction: 1951
Square Footage: 1,960
# of Floors: 1
# of Rooms: 3

History and Illustrative Reuse: Building 16 was originally used as a recreation/multi-purpose space. This open plan building, located on the center quadrangle of the base, receives a lot of natural light. Possible uses of this building are classroom/meeting, office, or studio space.

Building Number: 18
Original Name: Dining Hall 47 Old Dewline Road
Estimated Year of Construction: 1951
Square Footage: 4,680
# of Floors: 1
# of Rooms: 7


History and Illustrative Reuse: Located on the center quadrangle, Building #18 was used as the dining hall. Equipped with a large open hall area and kitchen, this building could be used as a dining facility and community center.

Building Number: 22
Original Name: Theater 51 Old Dewline Road
Estimated Year of Construction: 1951 \
Square Footage: 1,340
# of Floors: 1
#of Rooms: 7

History and Illustrative Reuse: Building 22 was originally used as a small theater with fixed seating and as a recreation building. This small space could be used for office and classroom or meeting space. There is abundant natural light. It is on the eastern edge of the site.

Building Number: 23
Original Name: Dormitory/BOQ 53 Old Dewline Road
Estimated Year of Construction: 1952
Square Footage: 11,240
# of Floors: 2
# of Rooms: 66

History and Illustrative Reuse: Building 23 was originally used as a Dormitory and known as a Bachelor Officers Quarters. Located at the eastern edge, this building overlooks the ocean. Market analysis identifies that this space could be used for small partner conferencing purposes with classroom meeting space, offices, and associated overnight accommodations, or as studio and laboratory workspace facilities with the same.

Building Number: 31
Original Name: Electrical Power Building 46 Old Dewline Road
Estimated Year of Construction: 1957
Square Footage: 6,564
# of Floors: 1
# of Rooms: 9

History and Illustrative Reuse: Building 31 was originally used as the Power Plant. Although no longer operable, the old turbines and equipment are still housed inside. Analyses identify possible use of this large space for shop, performance, or studio space.

Building Number: 32
Original Name: Office/Storage 48 Old Dewline Road
Estimated Year of Construction: 1951
Square Footage: 1,635
# of Floors: 1
# of Rooms: 5

History and Future Plans: Building 32 was originally used as a maintenance office and storage facility. Analyses indicate that this building is suitable for shop and office use or for studio use.

Building Number: 33
Original name: Multi-Purpose/Recreation Building 44 Old Dewline Road
Estimated Year of Construction: 1951
Square Footage: 5,460
# of Floors: 1
# of Rooms: 10

History and Illustrative Reuse: Building 33 was originally used as a multi-purpose and recreation building. Analyses identify possible use of this building as a theater with ample back-of-thehouse space, or for meeting and shops.

Building Number: 36
Original Name: Maintenance Shop 62 Old Dewline Road
Estimated Year of Construction: 1953
Square Footage: 2,470
# of Floors: 1
# of Rooms: 7

History and Future Plans: Building #36 was originally used as a maintenance shop. This building is suitable for similar maintenance shop, office use by NPS, or studio or classroom use. (This building is adjacent to the site’s wood-fired kiln.)

Residence Area


Up to eighteen houses are potentially being offered. (NPS may request that park staff lease up to 5 units if a single developer/operator entity is selected.)

Building Numbers: 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212 208, 206, 204, 202, 201, 203, 205, 207, 209, 214, 212, 210 Thatcher Blvd.
Original Name: Family Housing with Garage Estimated Year of Construction: 1959
Square Footage: 1,648 each
# of Floors: 1 each
# of Rooms: 7 each

History and Illustrative Reuse: These twelve buildings are part of a single-family housing area originally used by the families of Air Force officers. Separated from the main base building complex, analyses identify the possibility for use as suite accommodations or single-family residential use of these houses.

Building Numbers: 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218 (215 is slightly larger than the others) 111, 113, 115, 114, 112, 110 Wilson Blvd.
Original Name: Family Housing with Garage
Estimated Year of Construction: 1959
Square Footage: 1,815 each
# of Floors: 1 each
# of Rooms: 7 each

History and Illustrative Reuse: These six houses are part of a single-family housing area originally used by the families of Air Force officers. Separated from the main base building complex, analyses identify that these single-family houses have the potential for accessory workspace, universal (disabled) accessibility, and suite accommodations.

BUILDINGS FOR USE BY THE NPS AND INITIAL PROGRAM PARTNERS (NOT AVAILABLE FOR LEASE)


The park uses the former commissary, Building 45, as the North Atlantic Coastal Laboratory. Buildings 14 and 17 house the NPS Atlantic Learning Center classroom and laboratory, respectively. Buildings 34 and 37 and the former telephone building are used by CCNS for maintenance and other operations. NPS may also use additional buildings not identified.

Building 35, a former storage unit, was rehabilitated to house Castle Hill's wood-fired kiln in 2008.

The following buildings have been designated for use by existing Program Partners


Building Number: T5
Original Name: NCO Club/Mess
Estimated Year of Construction: N/A
Square Footage: 3,625
# of Floors: 1
# of Rooms: 12

History and Illustrative Reuse: Located on the southwest corner of the former North Truro Air Force Station, Building T5 was originally used as an NCO Club for officers. Building analyses project use of this onetime hot spot as a community building that could house exhibition, office and meeting spaces. Payomet Performing Arts Center in Truro is presently expressing plans to convert this space for its new home for office space, theatrical productions rehearsals, and exhibits.
 

Last updated: October 3, 2017

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