Boston's Revolutionary War

Faneuil Hall
Faneuil Hall
Many of the sites in Boston National Historical Park are associated with the beginnings of the American Revolution. To learn more about Boston's role please visit the sites above.
 
Old South Meeting House

Old South Meeting House

Built in 1729 as a Puritan house of worship, The old South Meeting House was the Largest building in colonial Boston. In the days leading to the American Revolution, citizens gathered here to challenge British rule, protesting the Boston Massacre and the tax on Tea.

 
Old State House

Old State House

Built in 1713, this historic landmark served as the seat of colonial and state governments as well as a merchant's exchange. In 1761 patriot James Otis opposed the Writs of Assistance here, inspiring John Adams to state "then and there the child independence was born."

 
Faneuil Hall

Faneuil Hall

This old market building, first built in 1742, sits at the site of the old town dock. Town meetings held here between 1764 and 1774, heard Samuel Adams and others lead cries of protest against the imposition of taxes on the colonies.

 
Paul Revere House sign

Paul Revere House

Boston's oldest residential neighborhood, the north end, contains some of the city's oldest buildings. The Paul Revere House is the oldest in downtown Boston. Built in 1680, it was owned and occupied by Paul Revere and his family most of the time from 1770 to 1800.

 
Old North Church

Old North Church

Built in 1723, Christ Church is better known as Old North. It is Boston's oldest church building and still an active Episcopal Church. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow memorialized Old North's role at the start of the Revolutionary War in his poem, "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere."

 
Bunker Hill Monument

Bunker Hill Monument

Dedicated in 1843, this 221-foot obelisk commemorates the revolution's first major battle, testing colonial unity against British forces.

 
Dorchester Heights

Dorchester Heights

In the evening of March 4, 1776, George Washington's army and local volunteers quietly fortified the summit of Dorchester Heights with cannon captured at Fort Ticondeoga. When the British army in Boston woke the next morning, they discovered that they were now surrounded. This action by the colonial militia hastened the decision by the British army to evacuate Boston nearly 2 weeks later.

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

Charlestown Navy Yard
Boston , MA 02129

Phone:

(617) 242-5601
Charlestown Navy Yard Visitor Center

Contact Us