Flintfest 2015

We are planning two great days of learning and fun for Flintfest 2015!

Scroll through the following schedule to find out what we have planned. Please note the time and location of each program - we often have more than one activity occurring at any given time.

 

Saturday, October 3, 2015

 
Traditional Cheyenne dress.
Traditional Cheyenne dress.

Photo Courtesy of Minoma Littlehawk-Sills

Guest Speakers

Morning & Afternoon presentations in the Events Tent – Cheyenne Life and Culture – Minoma LIttlehawk-Sills is a member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. She is a descendant of the Sand Creek Massacre, the Washita Battle and the Little Bighorn. Minoma has lived in the Cheyenne & Arapaho Nation of Oklahoma most of her life. She currently resides in Seiling, Oklahoma. Minoma was raised by her grandparents, the late Daniel Warren Big Foot Littlehawk and the late Leah Bear Head.

She earned an Associate's Degree in Arts & Science through the Cheyenne & Arapaho Tribal College and an Interdisciplinary Degree in Art Education, American Indian Studies and Park & Recreation through Southwestern Oklahoma State University. Minoma gained three years of experience as an Interpretive Ranger through her employment with the Washita Battlefield National Historic Site, through the Student Career Program, located near Cheyenne Oklahoma. Minoma has also worked at the Little Bighorn National Monument as a seasonal employee and is now currently employed with Roman Nose State Park in Oklahoma.

Minoma loves sharing her culture to keep the memories of her ancestors alive. She believes that each time she says their names, they are being kept alive, for those who are living today and for those yet unborn. One of the biggest elements of the Cheyenne and Arapaho is the fact that we are alive and well. We owe this to the women from the past and present.

11:00 a.m. – "Following the Parker Trail" – Author, Audrey Kalivoda will discuss her DVD. The poignant story of Cynthia Ann Parker and her son Quanah has held a special place in history. Taken from her family when she was 9, this blonde-haired, blue-eyed little girl became Comanche. Her oldest son, Quanah, would lead his people first down the war path and then down a path to a new way of life. Meet in the Alibates Visitor Center theater. 1 hour.

1:00 p.m. – "Kit Carson and the First Battle of Adobe Walls" – Well known as an explorer, guide, and frontiersman, Carson's involvement at the First Battle of Adobe Walls has been overlooked. Beginning his research in the 1990s, author Alvin Lynn set out to fill that void when he located and walked the 200-mile-long wagon road from Fort Bascom to Adobe Walls and collected 1,800 metal artifacts from fifteen historic camps, including the burned Kiowa village. Among the recovered artifacts were fired friction primers verifying the placement of howitzers at the battle site.

 
Hiking to the Quarries.
Taking a hike up to the Alibates Flint Quarries.

NPS Photo

Ranger-guided Hikes

9:00 a.m. –"Antelope Creek Peoples Village Site" – Join a Ranger on a special guided tour to the ruins of an Antelope Creek Village. View mysterious petroglyphs as you learn about the history of the area. Meet the Ranger in front of the Alibates Visitor Center and caravan to the trailhead. 2 hours.

9:30 a.m. –"Cowboy Days" – Take a hike with a Ranger and journey back to the early days of the Texas Panhandle. Walk on what was once the LX Ranch, where cowboys ruled the plains in 1877. Meet the Ranger in front of the Alibates Visitor Center. 45 minutes.

10:00 a.m. – "Touring Alibates Flint Quarries" – Learn about the Native Americans who once lived here and see the hand–dug quarries where the beautiful Alibates Flint was harvested. Meet the Ranger in front of the Alibates Visitor Center. 2 hours.

11:00 a.m. – "McBride Ranch Special Tour" – Visit the rock house built by David and Abigail McBride near the Canadian River in 1904. Today, we take a look behind the scenes at the McBride House and see a stark reminder of the rough and humble life of the early settlers in what is now Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. 1 1/2 hours.

1:00 p.m. –"The Ice Age" –Join the Ranger for a short walk and learn about Ice Age plants and animals that grew and lived here 10,000 years ago. Meet the Ranger in front of the Alibates Visitor Center. 45 minutes.

2:00 p.m. –"Alibates Flint Quarries" – Learn about the Native Americans who once lived here and see the beautiful Alibates Flint. Meet the Ranger in front of the Alibates Visitor Center. 2 hours.

 
Paul & Grace Jones demonstrate native flutes.
Paul & Grace Jones demonstrate native flutes.

Photo courtesy of Paul & Grace Jones.

Ongoing DEMONSTRATIONS (throughout the day)

Native Flute – Paul and Grace Jones, from Taos, New Mexico, demonstrate making Native American Flutes and play beautiful music. During the program Paul & Grace discuss the history and art of traditional Kokopelli flute building. Grace is Native American from Isleta Pueblo.

Pottery – A hallmark of the Jicarilla style of pottery is the use of clay rich in mica. Andrea Byers was taught the traditional Apache method of pottery making by Felipe Ortega, Jicarilla Apache Master potter and shaman. She makes her pottery and teaches the craft at her workshop, Hawk Landing Pottery Studio, near Sunday Canyon, Texas. Visit with Andrea in the Event Tent.

Flintknapping – Flintknapping is the process of chipping away material from high silica stones like flint in a carefully controlled manner, using special tools, to produce sharp projectile points or tools. Expert flintknappers from the local surrounding communities will be on hand to demonstrate the lost art of stone knapping or flint knapping by demonstrating the making of arrowheads, spear points, scrapers and knife blades as the ancient people did thousands of years ago.

Prehistoric Weapons – How did the ancient Native American people hunt for their food? Could we today have existed for long a thousand years ago? Come and find out. Try your luck at hunting using prehistoric weapons.

Falconry – Jimmy Walker will present an introduction to the sport of falconry, including a discussion on the history of falconry, and a description of some of the raptors and equipment used in the sport. He will also display one of his raptors used to hunt upland game birds rabbits and waterfowl. Visit with Jimmy in the Event Tent.

 
Junior Archeologist Badge and Arrowheads
Junior Archeologist badge with artifacts.

NPS Photo

Especially for Kids

10:00 a.m. – Become a Junior Archeologist! – Archeologists study human cultures throughout history. This allows us to understand how people and cultures have changed over time. What artifacts have been found in the Texas Panhandle? What can they tell us about the people who lived here before us? Join a ranger for an archeological dig designed especially for younger visitors. We will sift through a pit to discover ancient secrets and artifacts. Earn a special Junior Archeologist badge! Meet the Ranger in the Alibates Garden. 1-2 hours.

11:00 a.m. – Corn Grinding – Native Americans dating back to ancient times often grew corn, beans and squash together. Learn how to create your own "Three Sisters Garden" and grind corn in a real metate with a Ranger. Meet the Ranger on the Alibates Visitor Center patio. 30minutes.

1:00 p.m. – Native American-inspired Bracelets – Cultures all over the United States used colorful beadwork in their regalia. Drawing on this inspiration, spend a few minutes and create a beautiful hand-made bracelet. Meet the Ranger on the Alibates Visitor Center patio. 30 minutes.

2:00 p.m. – Corn Grinding – Native Americans dating back to ancient times often grew corn, beans and squash together. Learn how to create your own "Three Sisters Garden" and grind corn in a real metate with a Ranger. Meet the Ranger on the Alibates Visitor Center patio. 30 minutes.

 
Throwing a spear using an atlatl.
Using an atlatl to throw a spear.

NPS Photo

Atlatl Competition!

Archaeologists experimenting with the ancient spear thrower, or atlatl, in the 1980's sparked the development of a modern competitive sport. One of the popular atlatl events is the International Standard Accuracy Contest (ISAC).Learn more about this contest at the Alibates Flint Quarries visitor center. Remember to register for the contest at the visitor center by 2:00 p.m.!

8:30 - 10a.m. and from 1:00 - 2:30 p.m. Coaching and Practice Sessions

2:30 p.m. Mock Competitive Throw

Participants will be scored in accordance with rules set by the World Atlatl Association. This is a learning experience, not an official contest. There is no cost to participate, and Alibates Bragging Rights will be awarded.

Equipment will be provided, but you are welcome to bring your own. Any equipment used in the practice sessions and the mock contest must meet ISAC specifications (either primitive or open).Specifically, darts greater than ¾ inch (19mm) diameter will not be allowed to be thrown at the target.

There is no age limit, but children under the age of 10 may not have sufficient coordination to enjoy this activity.

If you want to do some homework before you arrive, check out the World Atlatl Association website at http://waa.basketmakeratlatl.com

 

Sunday, October 4, 2015

 
Traditional Cheyenne dress.
Traditional Cheyenne dress.

Photo Courtesy of Minoma Littlehawk-Sills

Guest Speaker

Morning & Afternoon presentations in the Events Tent – Cheyenne Life and Culture – Minoma LIttlehawk-Sills is a member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. She is a descendant of the Sand Creek Massacre, the Washita Battle and the Little Bighorn. Minoma has lived in the Cheyenne & Arapaho Nation of Oklahoma most of her life. She currently resides in Seiling, Oklahoma. Minoma was raised by her grandparents, the late Daniel Warren Big Foot Littlehawk and the late Leah Bear Head.

She earned an Associate's Degree in Arts & Science through the Cheyenne & Arapaho Tribal College and an Interdisciplinary Degree in Art Education, American Indian Studies and Park & Recreation through Southwestern Oklahoma State University. Minoma gained three years of experience as an Interpretive Ranger through her employment with the Washita Battlefield National Historic Site, through the Student Career Program, located near Cheyenne Oklahoma. Minoma has also worked at the Little Bighorn National Monument as a seasonal employee and is now currently employed with Roman Nose State Park in Oklahoma.

Minoma loves sharing her culture to keep the memories of her ancestors alive. She believes that each time she says their names, they are being kept alive, for those who are living today and for those yet unborn. One of the biggest elements of the Cheyenne and Arapaho is the fact that we are alive and well. We owe this to the women from the past and present.

 
Turtle petroglyph.
Turtle petroglyph.

NPS Photo

Ranger-guided Hikes

9:00 a.m. – "Antelope Creek Peoples Village Site" – Join a Ranger on a special guided tour to the ruins of an Antelope Creek Village. View mysterious petroglyphs as you learn about the history of the area. Meet the Ranger in front of the Alibates Visitor Center and caravan to the trailhead. 2hours.

10:00 a.m. – "Touring Alibates Flint Quarries" – Learn about the Native Americans who once lived here and see the hand–dug quarries where the beautiful Alibates Flint was harvested. Meet the Ranger in front of the Alibates Visitor Center. 2 hours.

2:00 p.m. – "Alibates Flint Quarries" – Learn about the Native Americans who once lived here and see the beautiful Alibates Flint. Meet the Ranger in front of the Alibates Visitor Center. 2 hours.

 
Flintknapping demonstration.
Flintknapping demonstration.

NPS Photo

Ongoing DEMONSTRATIONS

(throughout the day)

Flintknapping – Flintknapping is the process of chipping away material from high silica stones like flint in a carefully controlled manner, using special tools, to produce sharp projectile points or tools. Expert flintknappers from the local surrounding communities will be on hand to demonstrate the lost art of stone knapping or flint knapping by demonstrating the making of arrowheads, spear points, scrapers and knife blades as the ancient people did thousands of years ago.

Prehistoric Weapons – How did the ancient Native American people hunt for their food? Could we today have existed for long a thousand years ago? Come and find out. Try your luck at hunting using prehistoric weapons.

 
Grinding corn on a metate.

Especially for Kids

10:00 a.m. – Become a Junior Archeologist! – Archeologists study human cultures throughout history. This allows us to understand how people and cultures have changed over time. What artifacts have been found in the Texas Panhandle? What can they tell us about the people who lived here before us? Join a ranger for an archeological dig designed especially for younger visitors. We will sift through a pit to discover ancient secrets and artifacts. Earn a special Junior Archeologist badge! Meet the Ranger in the Alibates Garden. 1-2 hours.

1:00 p.m. – Native American-inspired Bracelets – Cultures all over the United States used colorful beadwork in their regalia. Drawing on this inspiration, spend a few minutes and create a beautiful hand-made bracelet. Meet the Ranger on the Alibates Visitor Center patio. 30 minutes.

2:00 p.m. – Corn Grinding – Native Americans dating back to ancient times often grew corn, beans and squash together. Learn how to create your own "Three Sisters Garden" and grind corn in a real metate with a Ranger. Meet the Ranger on the Alibates Visitor Center patio. 30 minutes.

Last updated: October 1, 2015

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 1460
Fritch, TX 79036

Phone:

(806) 857-6680

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