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Road Construction Delays Extended in Yosemite National Park

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Date: September 9, 2010

Extended Delays will include Friday and Saturday Nights

Road construction on the Wawona Road in Yosemite National Park began in May 2010. In an effort to complete this project by November 2010, roadwork will expand to include Friday and Saturday nights. New hours will go into effect tomorrow, Friday, September 10.

Visitors traveling into Yosemite via Highway 41/Wawona Road will experience up to 30 minute delays Monday through Thursday from 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. and on Fridays from 6:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thirty minute delays will also occur on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights from 9:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Additionally, 60 minute traffic delays will occur every night of the week, including Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights, from 11:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Visitors should be aware that construction delays will now occur seven days per week until the project is completed. However, there will be no traffic delays during the day on Saturdays and Sundays from 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

The project is currently improving 24.4 miles of the Wawona Road starting from the South Entrance of Yosemite and ending at the junction of the Wawona Road and Bridalveil Straight in Yosemite Valley. This project includes resurfacing, restoring, and rehabilitating the roadway, improving drainage and grading, adding new signage and striping of the roadway.

For current information on this project and other road projects, please visit: http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/roadwork.htm or call 209-372-0200.

Did You Know?

Nevada and Vernal Falls

In Yosemite Valley, dropping over 594-foot Nevada Fall and then 317-foot Vernal Fall, the Merced River creates what is known as the “Giant Staircase.” Such exemplary stair-step river morphology is characterized by a large variability in river movement and flow, from quiet pools to the dramatic drops of the waterfalls themselves.