• View from Battery DeGolyer

    Vicksburg

    National Military Park Mississippi

Tour Stop 2 - Shirley House

Shirley House

Shirley House during the Siege of 1863

The Shirley House was owned by James and Adeline Shirley and is the only wartime structure remaining inside Vicksburg National Military Park, and was referred to as the 'white house' by Federal soldiers during the siege.

On May 18, 1863, as the Confederate rear guard fell back into the Vicksburg defenses, soldiers were ordered to burn all the houses in front of their works. The Shirley barns and outbuildings were quickly burned to the ground, but the soldier assigned to destroy the house was shot before he could apply the torch.

Mrs. Shirley, her 15-year-old son Quincy, and several servants, were caught in the cross-fire as Union soldiers approached Vicksburg. Fearing for their lives, they remained in the house huddled in a chimney corner for three days before Mrs. Shirley tied a sheet to a broom handle and had it placed on the upper front porch. The frightened occupants of the 'white house' were finally removed by Union soldiers and given shelter in a cave.
 
Present-day Shirley House

Present-day Shirley House

NPS Photo

It was near the Shirley House that mining operations against the Confederate forts guarding Jackson road were initiated. When Major General Grant chose not to waste more soldiers' lives assaulting the southern strongpoints, digging mines underneath the Confederate lines became a viable alternative. West of the Shirley House lies the Third Louisiana Redan, a triangular earthwork, where Federal soldiers dug trenches to near the base of the redan. This avenue was known as Logan's Approach, since troops digging the trenches were commanded by Major General John A. Logan. Here a mine was started with the plan to explode a charge under the redan, allowing and Union soldiers to rush into the gap created in the fort's wall.
 

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Vicksburg National Military Park was the last of the first five National Military Parks established by the Congress of the United States during the last quarter of the 19th century.