Animals

The rainforest in and around Sitka National Historical Park is home to approximately 30 species of marine and land mammals, more than 200 species of birds, and several migratory and resident fish species.

 
A close up of a small, green aquatic insect being held in a person's hand.

Indian River depends upon insects in the cycle of nutrients and energy being carried through its waters.

NPS photo by Katy Kildee

Aquatic Insects

Insects and other macroinvertebrates serve as indicators of the health of our rivers and streams. Because of this, NPS researchers look at the insects surviving in the ecosystem as a way to monitor the health of our water systems.

Read more about these aquatic insects.

 
A white, tan and gray Sandpiper sits on a small pile of seaweed.

Intertidal and shoreline areas support a variety of migratory shore birds.

NPS photo by Paul Killian

Birdwatching in Sitka NHP

Though the charismatic bald eagles and ravens might dominate Sitka's skies, alpine, rainforest, riverine, and coastal ecosystems support both migratory and resident bird populations.

Read more about Sitka's diverse bird population.

 
An overhead shot of numerous salmon swimming upstream.

Pink Salmon returning to Indian River transport energy and nutrients from the ocean to the freshwater environment.

NPS photo by Michael Hess

Fish: Anadramous and Resident

Pacific salmon (especially pink salmon), two species of trout (cutthroat and rainbow), and one char (Dolly Varden) spawn in the Indian River.

Read more about salmon's great journey.

 
The eyes and nose of a Harbor Seal peeking out of calm, sunlight water.

Though the Harbor Seal doesn't live within the park limits, they can be observed from the shore.

NPS photo by Paul Killian

Spotting Mammals in the Park

Mammals are less commonly spotted in Sitka National Historical Park than birds and fish, but these fauna are present in the park and fill a unique niche.

Learn about Sitka's most common mammals.

Did You Know?