• Giant Sequoia Trees

    Sequoia & Kings Canyon

    National Parks California

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Institute Stage 2 Fire Restrictions

    Effective July 28, 2014, the parks are in Stage 2 fire restrictions. See link below for more information. These restrictions will remain in place until further notice. More »

  • Road Construction Delays Begin on Park Roads for 2014 Season

    Expect occasional 15-minute to 1-hour delays at various locations in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks beginning Monday, June 2, weekdays only, between 5 a.m.-3 p.m., including delays to/from the General Sherman Tree, Crystal Cave, and Grant Grove. More »

  • Vehicle Length Limits in Sequoia National Park (if Entering/Exiting Hwy 198)

    Planning to see the "Big Trees" in Sequoia National Park? If you enter/exit via Hwy. 198, please pay close attention to vehicle length advisories for your safety and the safety of others. More »

  • You May Have Trouble Calling Us

    We are experiencing technical problems receiving incoming phone calls. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please send us an email to SEKI_Interpretation@nps.gov or check the "More" link for trip-planning information. More »

Pets

Please read important park alerts by clicking the red tab above before you come to the parks.

For you and your neighbors to see and appreciate wildlife, please note that pets are not permitted on any of the trails in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

In campgrounds and picnic areas, pets must be kept on a leash at all times. The leash must be less than 6 feet (1.8 meters) long. For your pet's safety, please don't leave pets in hot cars. Pets cannot be left tied and unattended at any time.

In the National Forest, pets are allowed on trails. But the leash must be less than 6 feet (1.8 meters) long. See map below for locations of national forest areas adjoining Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Giant Sequoia National Monument is administered by the U.S. Forest Service.

 
Map showing different federally-managed jurisdictions around the parks.
NPS Graphic

Did You Know?

Copper Creek Valley.

The mid-elevation Sierra coniferous forest supports a remarkable diversity of tree species. Here ponderosa pine, incense-cedar, white fir, sugar pine, and scattered groves of giant sequoia intermix, forming one of the most extensive stands of old-growth coniferous forest remaining in the world. More...