• Canoeists paddle by tree lined shores

    Saint Croix

    National Scenic Riverway WI,MN

Fishing

The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway includes the St. Croix River and a major tributary, the Namekagon. Within the St. Croix watershed are numerous lakes, rivers and streams, most of which include fine fishing.

Generally, fish are divided into two categories, warm water and cold water species. Cold water habitat is critical for the support of trout. Warmer water will support those species that cannot thrive in colder water.

The Namekagon River upstream from Hayward is a cold water habitat and has received national recognition for i's quality fishing. Naturally reproducing brown and brook trout are plentiful. The section from Hayward down river to its confluence with the St Croix is a transition zone. Here trout become fewer and smallmouth bass begin to dominate, while walleyes and northern pike begin to increase in numbers.

The St Croix River is a warm water habitat. The stretch from Danbury down stream to St Croix Falls is recognized as one of the finest smallmouth bass fisheries in the country. The section from Taylors Falls to Stillwater is truly a river filled with warm water species; bass, walleyes, saugers, northern pike, muskellunge, catfish, suckers, sturgeon, carp and pan fish abound. The river from Stillwater to the Mississippi has slowed its flow and is now called Lake St Croix. Located close to the Twin Cities, this section is popular for watercraft sports; yet fishing remains productive.

Download a pdf of related information.(500K)

Same Fishing Guide in Hmong language

Are you interested in fishing records? Some have come out of the St. Croix. more...

 
A virus is now affecting fish in some Wisconsin waters. It has not been found in the St. Croix or Namekagon Rivers. With your help that will continue. Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) is a deadly fish virus and an invasive species that is threatening Wisconsin's fish. It is not harmful to humans, but it is harmful to fish. The Wisconsin DNR website provides more information.

Did You Know?

An aerial photo of the river splitting and a tributaru joining from the north

In the Dakota language The St. Croix River is O-Ki-Zu-Wa-Kpa: To meet or to unite, as the waters of a river gather into a lake or two rivers meet or an area where we planted. Dakota and Ojibwe Indians still live near St. Croix NSR.