• Canoeists paddle by tree lined shores

    Saint Croix

    National Scenic Riverway WI,MN

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  • High Water Levels On The St. Croix And Namekagon Rivers

    The St. Croix and Namekagon Rivers are running high, fast and cold due to snowmelt and recent rain. Ice flows and other floating debris may be present making conditions additionally hazardous. Osceola Landing has been closed. Other landings may be flooded More »

Mollusks

A yellowish-brown mussel, buried part way in the river bottom, has a white fleshy part sticking out from the shell

A mussel extrudes a lure for fish to attract them them to her.

NPS, Multi-agency zebra mussel dive team

Native Freshwater Mussels

The St. Croix has is known for having a mostly intact mussel population. Meaning, the species that lived here 100 years ago are still the species living here today. This includes 40 species of mussels, five of which are on the endangered species list. To see a list of the mussel species in the St. Croix, print a mussel fact sheet, or to learn more... about mussels

 
Female mussels need to find a fish to carry their glochidia, (baby mussels) for a few weeks. Then the young can survive on their own and will drop to the river bottom. Different mussel species use different methods to attract the fish and some are very picky as to what kind of fish they want to attract. Watch some videos of different mussels trying to attract a fish.
 

 

 

 

Did You Know?

A green dragonfly emerges from its old skin, seen below.

Dragonflies spend most of their life living in the water. Eventually they climb out of the water and grab onto something. Here they will emerge from their old skin like a butterfly emerges from its cocoon and fly away.