• High Peaks and Big Berry Manzanita. NPS Photo|Sierra Willoughby

    Pinnacles

    National Park California

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • No Fires - Fire Danger EXTREME - No Fuego

    No Fires in the campground, no smoking on the trails. Observe these rules to protect park resources. No se permite fumar en los senderos, tampoco se permite las fogatas en el campamento. Proteja los recursos del parque y respete las advertencias. More »

  • Fee Increase at Pinnacles National Park

    On August 1, 2014 the 7 day entrance pass for Pinnacles National Park will increase to $10 for passenger vehicles and motorcycles; bicycle and pedestrian entry will increase to $5.00. The Pinnacles Annual Pass will increase on August 1 to $20.00. More »

Plan Your Visit

Pinnacles is a great place to hike in Central California.

West-bound view of the Balconies on the Old Pinn trail.

People come to Pinnacles to hike, rock climb, watch and study wildlife, view wildflowers, and experience nature. Pinnacles offers solitude, challenge, and escape from the urban interface of both the San Francisco and Monterey Bay areas.

Unlike many national parks, Pinnacles is most popular in the cooler months. During the spring, when the grasses are green and a variety of wildflowers can be seen along any trail, hiking is at its best. Fall and winter are also excellent times to visit.

During the summer, extreme temperatures can make hiking uncomfortable at best, and possibly dangerous for those who are unprepared. If you plan to visit Pinnacles from late May through early September, please check the weather forecast and plan accordingly.

We recommend hikers consume at least one liter of water / hour while hiking under any weather conditions.


 

For Pinnacles weather information, including up-to-the-minute conditions, visit here.

 

For more trip planning tips for Pinnacles and the surrounding area visit our park partner Pinnacles Partnership.

Did You Know?

No Pets

Dogs are not permitted on park trails. This allows for more frequent wildlife sightings, and ensures that other visitors will not be annoyed or frightened by dogs. Dogs are permitted on most US Forest Service trails.