• Big-berry manzanita and the skyline of the high peaks greet visitors who explore the steep and narrow portion of the High Peaks trail. NPS Photo|Sierra Willoughby

    Pinnacles

    National Park California

Things To Do

Hiking Trails

There are over 30 miles of hiking trails at Pinnacles National Park, ranging from easy, flat walks to more challenging, all-day hikes. Please remember to carry and drink plenty of water, especially during the hot summer months.

Camping

Pinnacles Campground is now within the boundaries of Pinnacles National Park, and is managed by a concessionaire. Reservations are handled by recreation.gov or 1-877-444-6777. Tent, RV, and group sites are available.

 

Ranger Programs

Ranger talks, guided hikes, and evening programs are offered each spring on the east side of the park. Night programs are occasionally offered on weekends in spring, summer, and fall months.

Rock Climbing


There are hundreds of routes on both sides of the park. If you've never climbed at Pinnacles, be sure to read our climber's safety advisory. You'll also want to check our raptor advisory page for information on routes that are under adisory to protect nesting prairie and peregrine falcons.

Talus Caves

There are two talus caves at Pinnacles: the Bear Gulch Cave is closer to the east parking areas, and the Balconies Cave is closer to the west entrance. Check the status of the caves before you plan your visit.

 

Bird Watching

From the California Condor to the Acorn Woodpecker, birding can be very productive at Pinnacles National Park. Check our birding page for information on where to go and what you might see.

Did You Know?

The Five Sisters rock formation, as seen from the Bear Gulch Reservoir

Pinnacles National Park began as a volcanic field that originated about 195 miles south of its present location. It has traveled northward along the San Andreas Fault, and currently moves at a rate of about 3 - 6 centimeters per year.