• Historic buildings and the waterfront in New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park

    New Bedford Whaling

    National Historical Park Massachusetts

Places To Go

The New Bedford Whaling Museum
Discover the region's long-standing, historic relationship with the sea and the many cultures and people who contributed to New Bedford's dynamic past and diverse present, view remarkable exhibitions of maritime paintings, prints, decorative arts, scrimshaw and artifacts, climb aboard the world's largest ship model and much more.
 
The Rotch-Jones-Duff House and Garden Museum
Built in 1834 for whaling merchant William Rotch Jr., this Greek Revival mansion located on a full city block of formal gardens, is the best example of the "brave houses and flowery gardens" described by Herman Melville in Moby-Dick.
 

The Seamen's Bethel
Visit the Whaleman's Chapel from Melville's Moby-Dick and learn about the buildings past as a school, seamen's register, library and reading room, and its present as a memorial to whalemen and fishermen who have lost their lives at sea, as well as its role as a non-denominational chapel which still serves the seafaring community in New Bedford.

 

The Working Waterfront
Once lined with world-wandering whaleships, today the docks of New Bedford are home to hundreds of commercial fishing vessels. The fleet has consistently made New Bedford the number one fishing port in the country in terms of the dollar value of its catch. The waterfront is the essence of this community and offers an unobstructed view into the mechanics of the city's thriving fishing industry.

Come experience the waterfront in action and join us at the Working Waterfront Festival held in New Bedford every year.

Did You Know?

This National Historic Landmark was built for whaling merchant William Rotch Jr. in 1834.

The Rotch-Jones-Duff House and Garden Museum is the only whaling mansion on its original grounds and open to the public in New England.