• The Texas White House

    Lyndon B Johnson

    National Historical Park Texas

Things To Do

Visitors enjoy viewing longhorn cattle at the Johnson Settlement

Visitors get a get view of longhorn cattle at the Johnson Settlement.

Whether you have 30 minutes or a full day, there are many opportunities in the park to learn about President Johnson. Here are a few ideas on how to spend your time. Keep in mind that 14 miles separate the two visitor areas of the park: Johnson City and the LBJ Ranch/LBJ State Park and Historic Site. Allow 20 minutes to travel from one area to the other.

If you have:
30 minutes
1 hour
2 hours
More than 2 hours

 

30 Minutes

  • Take a ranger-guided tour of President Johnson's Boyhood Home.
  • Watch a movie. The National Park Visitor has two 30-minute videos to choose from: Ladybird Johnson and LBJ the President. There is a third movie shown at the LBJ State Park visitor center titled The Hill Country, LBJ's Texas.
  • View exhibits. The National Park Visitor Center has a timeline exhibit of the President's life and a description of the Great Society legislation including audio stations where you can hear history from the people who experienced it. There is a second exhibit area at the LBJ State Park visitor center.
  • Read more about the President, Texas History, or Hill Country plants and animals. Western National Parks Association operates a bookstore in both the National Park and LBJ State Park Visitor Centers. Something of interest might catch your eye as you browse through.
 

1 Hour

  • Take a walk. Take the trail to the Johnson Settlement. The circular trail is slightly less than a mile round-trip. Along the way you will find an exhibit center which will introduce you to the days of the cattle drives and the log home of President Johnson's grandparents.
 

2 Hours

 

More than 2 hours
Visitors with more time to spend will get the most complete picture of President Johnson's heritage, life, and legacy. Start your trip in either park area and combine 2 or more of the activities listed above to find out why President Johnson felt such a close connection to the Texas Hill Country.

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