• A plush carpet of green grass covering the Mound City Group in summer

    Hopewell Culture

    National Historical Park Ohio

Meet the Archeologists

August 15, 2013 Posted by: Cailey Mullins

 Dr. Bret Ruby

ChiefRM

Dr. Bret Ruby is the Chief of Resource Management at Hopewell. He received his Bachelor's degree from Kent State University and his Master's and PhD from Indiana University. He leads digs in the park each summer, and is a devoted staff member of the HOCU team.

Dr. Kathy Brady

Brady

Dr. Kathy Brady is the Curator of Hopewell Culture. She received her Bachelor's, Master's, and PhD from The Ohio State University. As head curator, Dr. Brady is in charge of the park's collections and exhibitions. When she isn't working with the artifacts, Dr. Brady can be found out in the field doing wonderful archeological research. 

Tim Everhart

Tim Everhart

Tim Everhart is a seasonal interpretive ranger and seasonal archeological technician at the park. He is currently an Anthropology student at The Ohio State University, and plans to carry on his education with graduate work.  Tim has been with the park for four years. 

Patrick Zingerella

Patrick Zingerella

Patrick Zingerella is a seasonal archeological technician at HOCU this summer. He is a graduate of the University of Kentucky, and has worked on numerous archeological projects all over the United States. Patrick was an integral part of the team this summer. 

Jason Smith

Jason Smith

Jason Smith is also a seasonal archeological technician at Hopewell Culture. Before becoming an archeologist, Jason served in the Marines for several years. He has worked on many archeological projects all around the country, and will continue his career at Mesa Verde after the summer.

Cailey Mullins

Cailey Mullins

Cailey Mullins is an archeological intern at Hopewell. She is beginning her education at Indiana University this fall to study Anthropology and Classical Studies. Her work at the park this summer marks the beginning of her archeological career.


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Did You Know?

Pink heelsplitter mussel

Freshwater mussels were an important resource for Hopewellian people. They were used as food, provided pearls for ornaments and shells were utilized for hoes. Although plentiful during the Middle Woodland period, over-harvesting and low water quality have reduced their numbers drastically today. Many freshwater mussels are on the State and Federal Endangered Species list. More...