• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Closure

    The Moose-Wilson Road between Death Canyon Junction north to the intersection with the Murie Center Road is temporarily closed to motor vehicles, bicycles, skating, skateboards and similar devices. More »

  • Pathway Closure

    The Multi-use Pathway will be closed from the Gros Ventre Bridge to the Snake River Bridge starting on September 15, 2014 due to construction. Construction on this section of pathway is expected to be completed by October 13, 2014.

Photos & Multimedia

Experience a virtual hike around String Lake from your computer with the Grand Teton National Park's brand new eHike.

Visit the photo gallery to view park images.
Check out Grand Teton's blog Teton Tidbits.
For web videos and podcasts you can go directly to the Podcasts and Cell Tours webpage.
Visit our YouTube channel for more videos.
We also have a Facebook page to see additional photos and videos of the park.
Download audio descriptions of our historic wayside signs.

Celebrate 40 years of the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway! Check out our anniversary blog, 40 days to 40 years, featuring hikes, history, wildlife, and other tidbits relating to the Parkway!

 
Lenticular clouds hover over the Teton Range, windswept snow and sagebrush in the valley below.
Lenticular clouds hover over the Teton Range with windswept snow and sagebrush in the valley below.
KFinch Photo

Did You Know?

Pika with a mouth full of grass

Did you know that pikas harvest grasses so they can survive the long cold winter? These small members of the rabbit family do not hibernate, but instead store their harvest as “haystacks” under rocks in the alpine environment.