• Teton Range in Winter

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. When is the park open?
  2. How much does it cost to enter Grand Teton National Park?
  3. Can I bring my pet into the park?
  4. Where can I get information after I have arrived in the park?
  5. What do I do if I have an emergency in the park?
  6. What wildlife can I see in the park?
  7. Where can I find information about day hikes and backcountry camping?
  8. How long does it take to visit Grand Teton National Park?
  9. What lodging and campgrounds are available in the park?
  10. What kinds of activities are available in the park?
  11. When does the park close?

1. When is the park open?

The park is open year-round although many facilities (including visitor centers and ranger stations), concessioners and roads close for the winter season. The outer highway 26/89/191 is open year-round within the park and east through Togwotee Pass to Dubois. The Teton Park Road is closed to vehicles from the Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge November 1 through April 30 or longer depending on snow conditions. During this period, the road is open to non-motorized recreation (skiing, snowshoeing, cycling, walking, rollerblading) depending on road conditions. Seasonal and other road closures and construction information can be found on the Park News page.

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2. How much does it cost to enter Grand Teton National Park?

Your entrance fees help support visitor services, maintenance of trails, roads and visitor facilities, as well as many other projects that directly benefit visitors like you. Entrance fees are $25 per vehicle for seven days for access to Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks. Bikers and hikers can enter the park for $12 per person for seven days and $20 for motorcyclists. If you love visiting national parks, you can purchase an Interagency Annual Pass for $80 for one year of access to most national parks and federal recreation areas throughout the nation. For more information on entrance fees and entrance passes visit the Fees & Reservations page.

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3. Can I bring my pet into the park?

To ensure that you and your pet enjoy a safe visit, follow all pet regulations while inside the park. Wildlife may be drawn to pets and their owners; pets can wander away and may never be found-the park is a wild place! These regulations are enforced to protect you, park resources and other visitors.

Pets are allowed inside Grand Teton National Park, but they must be restrained at all times and are not permitted on hiking trails, inside visitor centers or other facilities. A good rule of thumb is that a pet may go anywhere a car may go: roads and road shoulders, campgrounds and picnic areas, parking lots, etc. Pets must be on a leash six feet long or less and within 30 feet of the road. Pets are not allowed on any park trails or in the park backcountry. Pets are not considered pack animals.

For a listing of kennels outside the park and more information on pet safety and regulations in the park visit the Pets page.

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4. Where can I get information after I have arrived in the park?

During summer, several visitor centers and one ranger station inside the park are the best source for information about the park. Visitor centers in the park are located at Moose, Jenny Lake, Colter Bay and the Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve. The ranger station at south Jenny Lake provides information and backcountry permitting for climbing and mountaineering in the park. Visit the interagency visitor center in the town of Jackson on Cache Street for information on the park during the winter and for information on the National Elk Refuge, national forests and other public lands as well as town information. For more information visit the Operating Hours & Seasons page.

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5. What do I do if I have an emergency in the park?

Call 911! There are public phones at the following locations (from south to north): Moose, Dornan’s, south Jenny Lake, Signal Mountain Lodge, Moran Entrance Station, Jackson Lake Lodge, Colter Bay Village, Leeks Marina and Flagg Ranch. Medical services are available at St. John’s Medical Center in Jackson at 625 E. Broadway Street and at the Grand Teton Medical Clinic at the Jackson Lake Lodge during the summer.

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6. What wildlife can I see in the park?

Grand Teton National Park is world-renowned for its wildlife viewing opportunities. Some of the most sought-after animals found inside the park include: moose, black and grizzly bears, pronghorn, elk, bald eagles, gray wolves, coyotes and bison. Always stay a safe distance of at least 100 yards from wolves and bears and 25 yards from all other wildlife. Wild animals are unpredictable and can cause personal injury or even death if not respected. For more information on finding wildlife in the park and for guidelines on viewing animals safely in the park visit the Wildlife Viewing page.

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7. Where can I find information about day hikes and backcountry camping?

Hiking information is available in person at park visitor centers and online by visiting the Hiking page. Stop by a visitor center to answer your questions, and find out trail conditions and closures. Purchase hiking maps at visitor centers or directly from the Grand Teton Association. Maps can also be purchased at concessioner-operated gift stores and outdoor shops throughout the park.

Backcountry camping information is available at park visitor centers. Permits are required for all overnight stays in the backcountry and can be obtained at the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center, Jenny Lake Ranger Station, or Colter Bay Visitor Center. Walk-up backcountry permits may be obtained up to one day in advance and are free. Groups of 7-12 people must camp in a designated group site. Reservations are accepted from January 5 to May 15 of every year and there is a $25 non-refundable fee. Visit the Backcountry Camping page and the Backcountry Reservations page for more information.

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8. How long does it take to visit Grand Teton National Park?

You could spend a lifetime exploring the park and parkway. If you only have a day or just a few hours, you can still experience this magnificent place. To travel through the park from the southern boundary of Grand Teton National Park to Yellowstone National Park via the outer Highway 26/89/191 takes a little more than one hour not including stops along the way; to travel through the park via the Teton Park Road takes slightly longer.

Wildlife from the small Uinta ground squirrel up to the 2,000 pound bison may be on the roadways at anytime. Every year more than 100 large animals are killed causing thousands of dollars of property damage and personal injury. Speed limits range from 25 MPH to 55 MPH in the park and parkway; obey all speed limits for your safety and the wildlife.

There are many scenic turnouts along the roads where you can read wayside exhibits and learn about the park. If you have more time to enjoy the park, stop at a visitor center and find out about ranger-led walks and talks. Hiking trails, picnic areas, and concession-operated restaurants and services can be found throughout the park. Raft the Snake River, ride a boat across Jenny Lake, or climb the Grand Teton-there are countless activities to enjoy during your visit.

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9. What lodging and campgrounds are available in the park?

Concessioners operate a variety of accomodations in the park from dorm-style rooms and cabins to full-service resort hotels. For more information on accommodations in the park visit the Lodging page.

There are five developed campgrounds in Grand Teton National Park. Reservations are available for some campgrounds for group sites, as well as first-come, first-served. The fee is $20.50 per night for a site or $8 per person per night for hiker/biker. The maximum length of stay is seven days per person at Jenny Lake and 14 days at all other park campgrounds, with no more than 30 days total allowed in the park campgrounds per year. Sites are limited to six people, two tents, and two vehicles (only one vehicle at JennyLake). Larger groups will need to split up into two separate sites and must do all activities (cooking, sleeping, etc) separately.

These campgrounds do not have hook-ups. Water and dump-stations are centrally located in Gros Ventre, Signal Mountain and Colter Bay campgrounds. Two RV park campgrounds in the park do have hook-ups:

  • Colter Bay RV Park (307) 543-3100 or (800) 628-9988
  • Headwaters Campground and RV sites at Flagg Ranch (800) 443-2311

Group campsites may be reserved and are available only at the Colter Bay and Gros Ventre campgrounds. Group site capacities range from 10 to 100 people. Make requests for reservations starting January 1 by calling the Grand Teton Lodge Company at (800) 628-9988 or (307) 543-3100; faxing (307) 739-3438. Visit the Camping page for more detailed information.

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10. What kinds of activities are available in the park?

Walk through a historic landmark district, view bison sparring from a roadside turnout, float the Snake River-there is something for everyone at Grand Teton National Park. Pick up hiking maps and information on activities such as fishing, boating and climbing at park visitor centers. There are a variety of guide services and recreation concessioners that operate in the park. Or join a ranger-led walk or talk at a park visitor center. To find out more about park activities visit the Things to Do page.

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11. When does the park close?

The park entrance gates do not close, but hours vary for park facilities, concessioners and visitor centers. Watch for wildlife crossing the roads at dusk and dawn and drive with caution at night; bison are especially difficult to see at night and can weigh up to one ton. Some roads and facilities close seasonally.

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Did You Know?