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NPS Intermountain Regional Director Approves Snake River Headwaters Comprehensive Management Plan

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The Snake River compliments the rugged Teton peaks as it winds its way across the Jackson Hole valley.
Grand Teton National Park photo

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News Release Date: March 6, 2014
Contact: Public Affairs Office, 307.739.3393

National Park Service Intermountain Regional Director Sue Masica has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for theSnake River Headwaters Comprehensive River Management Plan and Environmental Assessment (CRMP/EA). Over the past three years, Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway and the National Elk Refuge have jointly prepared the CRMP/EA in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The FONSI identified the agencies' preferred alternative (Alternative C) as presented in the CRMP/EA as the selected action. 

The Craig Thomas Snake Headwaters Legacy Act of 2008 added 414 miles of rivers and streams of the Snake River headwaters to the national wild and scenic rivers system. In accordance with requirements of the act, the CRMP/EA was prepared for those river segments that are managed by the National Park Service (NPS) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The Bridger-Teton National Forest developed a separate but concurrent plan for U.S. Forest Service (USFS) managed segments. These comprehensive river management plans will provide long-term guidance for protecting and enhancing the entire Snake River headwaters administered by the federal agencies. During the CRMP/EA development, joint NPS/USFWS/USFS meetings were held to ensure public engagement and participation in the process.  

The CRMP/EA identified the outstandingly remarkable values for which the river segments were designated, including its free flowing condition and water quality. The EA also identified goals for protecting river values, boundary delineation, development of lands and facilities, evaluation of water resource projects, instream flows, user capacity, recreational activities,and monitoring strategies. The selected action will be implemented by the superintendents of Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway, and the National Elk Refuge manager. 

Under the finalized plan, 39 miles of the Snake River headwaters are open to non-motorized boating and other activities within the three national park units, offering opportunities to experience and enjoy the unique qualities of a wild and scenic river for both private and commercial users. Infrastructure within the river corridor will be consolidated, with modest improvements such as upgrades to road access and parking at the popular Deadman's Bar landing in Grand Teton National Park. Visitor connections with the natural world will be emphasized through interpretive opportunities and more primitive, recreational experiences in the undeveloped natural settings of the river corridor. In general, use levels will be similar to—or lower than—the existing conditions. Recreational activities will be consistent with the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act which provides for the protection and enhancement of river values 

"This plan provides numerous options for river users to enjoy the beauty and natural surroundings of the Snake River headwaters, while preserving the qualities that make it a wild and scenic river deserving of conservation and protection,"  said Kevin Schneider, acting Grand Teton National Park superintendent. "We will continue to provide outstanding river recreation opportunities, while also protecting the associated geologic, scenic, cultural, and wildlife values of this river corridor for future generations."  

Copies of the FONSI and CRMP/EAare online at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/snakeriver and on Grand Teton's website at www.nps.gov/grte/parkmgmt/planning.htm.

Did You Know?

Bill Menors Ferry

Did you know that until the 1890s no one had settled on the west bank of the Snake River in the central part of Jackson Hole? William “Bill” Menor built a ferry at Moose to shuttle patrons across the river, the only reliable crossing point between Wilson and Moran.