• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Status

    The Moose-Wilson Road between the Death Canyon Road and the Murie Center Road is currently open to all traffic. The road may re-close at any time due to wildlife activity. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

Active Trails Program & Wellness Initiative Launched

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Date: May 31, 2013
Contact: Public Affairs Office, 307.739.3393

In partnership with St. John's Medical Center, Grand Teton National Park will launch a new Active Trails program with a kick-off event June 6 from 5-7 p.m. at Miller Park in Jackson, Wyoming. The first 10 people to register for participation in the Active Trails program will receive a free annual pass to Grand Teton National Park, and a few lucky participants who attend a bear safety presentation will receive a free can of bear spray. Grand Teton's Active Trails program is funded through a grant by the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America's national parks. 

Grand Teton is partnering with the wellness program at St. John's Medical Center to launch this initiative focused on getting Jackson Hole community members active and outside. The partnership supports an online tracking portal where participants will log hiking and biking miles. Registered participants who log their progress on the portal are automatically entered in a lottery to win prizes that will get them back in the park for even grander experiences. Prizes will range from meals at restaurants located in the park to family adventure packages. 

On the 13th of each month, Grand Teton park ranger naturalists will lead family friendly hikes for Active Trails participants. Free transportation will be offered to and from town to join these hikes. For details, please call 307.739.3399. Additional information about the hikes will be posted on the Active Trails portal.  

To register as a participant in Active Trails go to www.sjmcwellness.com and create an account. Use the code AT2013 to create an Active Trails account. 

Grand Teton was one of 22 national parks from across the country selected to receive a 2013 Active Trails grant from the National Park Foundation. Now in its fifth year nationally, the Active Trails program supports hands-on projects that encourage the public to lead healthy lives by actively engaging in activities that restore, protect, and create land and water trails across America. Since 2008, the National Park Foundation has granted nearly $1.7 million through its Active Trails program. 

Grand Teton National Park is grateful for the ongoing support from Grand Teton Association and their contributions to this program. The National Park Foundation wishes to thank Coca-Cola and the Coca-Cola Foundation for their generous support of the Active Trails program. 

ABOUT THE NATIONAL PARK FOUNDATION:
The National Park Foundation, the official charity of America's national parks, raises private funds that directly aid, support and enrich America's more than 400 national parks and their programs. Chartered by Congress as the nonprofit partner of the National Park Service, the National Park Foundation plays a critical role in conservation and preservation efforts, establishing national parks as powerful learning environments, and giving all audiences an equal and abundant opportunity to experience, enjoy and support America's treasured places. www.nationalparks.org.

Did You Know?

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