• Moose cow and calf

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

Fifth Annual Grand Teton Music Festival Concerts in the Park

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: July 10, 2012
Contact: Public Affairs Office, 307.739.3431

Grand Teton National Park and the Grand Teton Music Festival have once again joined together to host the fifth year of special programs promoting the connection between nature and music. Created through a special partnership, the "Music in Nature" concert series runs from July 3 through July 27. The Grand Teton Music Festival's WindSynch woodwind Quintet will perform hour-long programs of music inspired by nature; a park ranger will host each performance. The concerts are free and open to the public.  

These musicians will delight listeners through their recitals, continuing a musical tradition inspired by the beauty of Grand Teton National Park and its majestic scenery. Visit the Grand Teton Music Festival website for more information at www.gtmf.org. 

Concerts are scheduled for the Colter Bay Visitor Center back deck Jackson Lake Lodge lobby, and the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center in Moose. Time and locations of concerts are:                                     

Tuesdays and Wednesdays
11:30 a.m. Colter Bay Visitor Center back deck   
12:30 p.m. Colter Bay Visitor Center back deck     

Wednesdays
5:00 p.m. Jackson Lake Lodge lobby
6:00 p.m. Jackson Lake Lodge lobby 

Thursdays
11:30 a.m. Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center (Moose)
12:30 p.m. Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center (Moose) 

Fridays 
2:30 p.m. Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center (Moose)                                                                                                                   
3:30 p.m. Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center (Moose)   

Did You Know?

Mt. Moran in July

Did you know that the black stripe, or dike, on the face of Mount Moran is 150 feet wide and extends six or seven miles westward? The black dike was once molten magma that squeezed into a crack when the rocks were deep underground, and has since been lifted skyward by movement on the Teton fault.