• Approximately 1,500 black bears live in the national park.

    Great Smoky Mountains

    National Park NC,TN

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  • Spring Road Status

    During spring, park roads may close due to ice, especially at high elevation where wet roads can freeze as temperatures drop at night. For road status information call (865) 436-1200 ext. 631 or follow updates at http://twitter.com/SmokiesRoadsNPS. More »

Current Conditions

The Chimney Tops Trail bridge twisted and damaged after a flood in 2013

A flash flood damaged a bridge on Chimney Tops Trail in January 2013. The bridge was replaced and the trail reopened several months later in early summer.

Road, Trail, and Facility Closures and Warnings

Road, trail, and facility closures may occur due to severe weather events such as winter storms, floods, and tormados. Backcountry campsites, shelters, and trails that are frequented by black bears may have warnings posted or be closed. Check current closures before coming to the park.

For updated road information please call (865) 436-1200. Once you hear a voice, dial extension 631 for road information.

Follow road status updates on Twitter at http://twitter.com/smokiesroadsnps. Updates are available for Newfound Gap Road (US-441), Little River Road, Laurel Creek Road, and Cades Cove Loop Road.

 

Weather Forecasts

Current weather forecasts are available by phone at (865) 436-1200 extension 630 or online from the National Weather Service:

Gatlinburg, TN forecast
Cherokee, NC forecast
Temperature and precipitation data for past 24 hours

 

WebCams

Two webcams provide a current view of the park and information about air quality conditions. Images are updated every 15 minutes.

Look Rock (located on the western end of the park)
Purchase Knob (located on the eastern end of the park)

Did You Know?

Scientists estimate that 100,000 different species live in the park.

What lives in Great Smoky Mountains National Park? Although the question sounds simple, it is actually extremely complex. Right now scientists think that we only know about 17 percent of the plants and animals that live in the park, or about 17,000 species of a probable 100,000 different organisms.