• View of Grand Canyon National Park at sunset from the South Rim

    Grand Canyon

    National Park Arizona

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  • Expect a Good Chance of Showers and Thunderstorms Through the Week.

    Monsoonal weather patterns have moved into the Grand Canyon area decreasing fire danger. As a result, on Tuesday, July 8 at 8 a.m. fire managers lifted fire restrictions within Grand Canyon National Park. More »

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    One on the North Kaibab Trail and the other at Tusayan Ruin/Museum. Rabies can be prevented if appropriate medical care is given following an exposure. Any persons having physical contact with bats in Grand Canyon National Park, please follow this link. More »

Grand Canyon National Park to Implement Fire Restrictions Friday, June 13

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Date: June 10, 2014
Contact: Kirby-Lynn Shedlowski, 928-638-7958

Grand Canyon, Ariz. – Due to increased fire danger throughout Grand Canyon National Park, park officials will be implementing fire restrictions for all areas within the park except the Colorado River corridor.

Beginning at 8 a.m. on Friday, June 13, all wood burning and charcoal fires, including campfires, warming fires and charcoal barbeques, will be prohibited throughout the park, including all campgrounds and residential areas. Pressurized liquid or gas stoves, lanterns and heaters possessing shut-off devices are allowed.

The restrictions are being implemented in response to current and predicted weather and fuel conditions, as well as corresponding fire danger rating levels. The South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park is at extreme fire danger and the North Rim is at very high fire danger. These conditions are expected to remain at until monsoonal moisture occurs. The restrictions will remain in place until significant precipitation falls and fire danger levels subside.  "We always hope visitors will consider taking some additional voluntary precautions to help prevent wildfires." says Chief of Fire and Aviation Jay Lusher.

One Less Spark One Less Wildfire. Please do your part. Don't let a wildfire start.

  • Before going hiking or camping, check for fire restrictions and closures in the area. Direct your inquiries to the agency that manages the public lands you are visiting.
  • If you are a smoker, smoke only on paved surfaces or in an enclosed vehicle. Never toss cigarette butts on the ground or out the window of a vehicle. Always use an ashtray to prevent wildfires. Practice Leave No Trace principles - pack out cigarette butts and burned materials from your camping area.
  • If you are using a portable stove, clear the area of grasses and other fine fuels and be careful to prevent the stove from tipping over.
  • Make sure your vehicle is properly maintained, with nothing dragging on the ground. Dragging chains will throw sparks. Never substitute parts when towing. Only use appropriate safety pins & hitch ball.
  • Check tire pressure. Driving on an exposed wheel rim throws sparks.
  • Never let your brake pads wear too thing. Metal on metal makes sparks.
  • Never park a vehicle over dead grass; the catalytic converter can ignite the vegetation.
  • Carry a fire extinguisher in your vehicle and learn how to use it.
  • If you see smoke or fire, call 911. Report the location, what is burning, how fast it is moving, how tall the flames are, and what is in danger. Stay on the phone. Do NOT attempt to put out a fire by yourself.

For the latest fire information in Grand Canyon National Park, please visit our web site at http://www.nps.gov/grca/parkmgmt/fire_info.htm. To learn more about fire restrictions on other public lands in Arizona and New Mexico, please call the Southwest Area Fire Restriction Information Line at 877-864-6985 or visit http://wildlandfire.az.gov

 

-NPS-

Did You Know?

SPRINGS PROVIDE OASES FOR FLORA AND FAUNA

Within the Grand Canyon, the type and abundance of organisms is directly related to the presence or absence of water. The Colorado River and its tributaries, as well as springs, seeps, stock tanks and ephemeral pools provide oases to flora and fauna in this semi-arid southwest desert area.