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    National Park Arizona

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Rangers Respond to Report of Woman Over Edge at Grandview

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Date: July 19, 2012
Contact: Shannan Marcak, 928-638-7958

Grand Canyon, Ariz. - At approximately, 1:20 p.m. on Thursday, July 19, the Grand Canyon Regional Communications Center received a report that an older woman had fallen over the edge at Grandview Point, located on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, and that she was not responding to people calling down to her.

Upon arriving at the scene, emergency responders determined that the woman had actually fallen from the Grandview Trail and began hiking down. A short distance down the trail, they spotted the woman and two other people approximately 300 feet below where she had fallen from the trail. The two other people, one a relative of the woman who fell, reported being unable to find a pulse. Rangers rappelled the remainder of the distance to the woman and began CPR. However, their life-saving efforts proved unsuccessful.

At approximately, 4:15 p.m., the woman's body was flown to the canyon rim by helicopter via long-line (suspended below the helicopter) and transferred to the Coconino County Medical Examiner's representative.

An investigation into the incident is being conducted by the National Park Service in cooperation with the Coconino County Medical Examiner.

No additional information is available at this time. 

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Exotic tamarisk impacting the Colorado River corridor

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