• View of Grand Canyon National Park at sunset from the South Rim

    Grand Canyon

    National Park Arizona

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  • Dry and Warmer from Today into Early Next Week

    Monsoonal weather patterns have moved into the Grand Canyon area decreasing fire danger. As a result, on Tuesday, July 8 at 8 a.m. fire managers lifted fire restrictions within Grand Canyon National Park. More »

  • Two Bats Collected in the Park Have Tested Positive for Rabies

    One on the North Kaibab Trail and the other at Tusayan Ruin/Museum. Rabies can be prevented if appropriate medical care is given following an exposure. Any persons having physical contact with bats in Grand Canyon National Park, please follow this link. More »

Amphibians

spadefoot toad

Spadefoot Toad

K. Kingsley, NPS

Riparian: The three most common amphibians in the Grand Canyon are the canyon treefrog, red-spotted toad, and Woodhouse’s rocky mountain toad. These amphibians need the Colorado River or perennial tributaries in order to breed, since their egg masses and tadpoles are water bound. However, they are more tolerant of desiccation than most amphibians, and red-spotted toads have been found as far as one-half mile from a known water source. Leopard frogs are very rare in the Colorado River corridor, and are known to exist at only a few sites.


Desert Scrub: Amphibians are generally absent from dry desert upland areas that are more than one mile from water.

Coniferous Forest: The Utah tiger salamander and the Great Basin spadefoot toad are two amphibians that are common in the rim forests. They live in the North Rim's moist grasslands near ponds or stock tanks and in more mesic habitats on the South Rim. The Arizona tiger salamander and the Great Plains toad are more rare and are seldom seen.
 

Did You Know?

CCC STRINGS THE INNER-CANYON TELEPHONE LINE

In November of 1934, the Grand Canyon Civilian Conservation Corps began working on a telephone line through the canyon. They started at Indian Garden and moved down to the Colorado River. They needed to complete this portion of the line first before the extreme summer heat started. More...