• Night skies over Great Basin National Park

    Great Basin

    National Park Nevada

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  • Road Work at Great Basin National Park

    Road work will begin in Upper Lehman and Wheeler Peak Campgrounds. Campgrounds will be open but may be noisy and have large vehicles on the roads. The Scenic Drive is open with up to 15 min delays due to road work. Click more for details. Updated 9/9/14 More »

  • Snake Creek Road and Campsites Closed

    The Snake Creek Road will be closed from the park boundary into the park to begin work on campsites, trails and restroom improvements. Work will continue until snow closes the project. Work will resume in Spring 2015.

History & Culture

The story of the Great Basin is not just one of geology and landforms, but also of people. This region has been home to American Indians for thousands of years. In more recent times, farmers and ranchers, Mormons and sheepherders, all called the Great Basin home.

Within Great Basin National Park, a representive piece of this massive region, stories of people and of places abound. Humans have left their mark here, too; from the Fremont Indians, who lived in Snake Valley, to Absalom Lehman, discoverer of Lehman Caves, to the mining camps that at one time dotted the South Snake Range. Remnants of former times are abundant. They are worthy of preservation as much as any natural feature, as they are invaluable links to the past.

Great Basin National Park Historic Resource Study
The single most comprehensive document on the cultural history of the area within and surrounding Great Basin National Park is the Great Basin National Park Historic Resource Study, completed in 1990. This Study contains information on the area from prehistory, exploration, and Native American occupation, to mining, ranching, and the creation of Great Basin National Park in 1986.

This document is made available for download online through the link below.

Great Basin National Park Historic Resource Study

Did You Know?

Bristlecone Pine; photographed by Kathy Billings

Many of Great Basin National Park's bristlecone pines were growing at the time the Egyptians were building the pyramids. Not only are the trees themselves old, but the needles alone can be 25-40 yrs old!