• Pa-Hay-okee Overlook

    Everglades

    National Park Florida

Bird Watching Spots

ahinga_trail

NPS photo  J Roark

Anhinga Trail

Wading birds, cormorants, Purple Gallinules, and nesting Anhingas may be found along the path anytime of the day during the winter (dry) season.

 
Eco Pond

NPS Photo  J Roark

Eco Pond

Wading birds, American Coots, Osprey, White-crowned Pigeons, warblers, Red-shouldered Hawks, Anhingas, rails, Painted Buntings and other transients are best viewed here in the morning.



 
web-gulf-coast-visitor-center

NPS Photo  J Roark

Gulf Coast Visitor Center and Vicinity

Wading birds, cormorants, Osprey, Bald Eagles, pelicans, and shorebirds can be observed from the visitor center or by boat in the 10,000 Islands. Peregrine Falcons, Swallow-tailed Kites, Wood Storks, skimmers, and a variety of warblers make a seasonal appearance.



 
manogany hammock

NPS Photo  J Roark

Mahogany Hammock and Vicinity

Cape Sable Seaside Sparrows may be heard and seen early in the morning from the main park road during the spring. Bald Eagles and warblers are also active in the morning, while Barred Owls come out in the evening.



 
  Mrazek Pond

NPS Photo  J Roark

Mrazek Pond

Most of the year only a few ducks and wading birds, but for a few days during some winters, large numbers of wading birds, including Roseate Spoonbills and Wood Storks, move in to feast.



 
nine mile pond

NPS Photo  J Roark

Nine Mile Pond

Snail Kites, wading birds, Wood Storks, Roseate Spoonbills, Limpkins, and White-crowned Pigeons make this spikerush community their home. The best times to find these birds is in the morning via canoe._



 
Paurotis-Pond-Closed-for-Nesting-Season-2013

NPS Photo  J Roark

Paurotis Pond

Roseate Spoonbills and wading birds make appearances year round, while in the early spring a Wood Stork rookery dominates the mangroves of this small pond.



 
shark valley tram road

NPS Photo  J Roark

Shark Valley Tram Road and Vicinity

Wood Storks, wading birds, Snail Kites, and Anhingas may be found throughout the day along the tram road.



 
End of Trail

NPS Photo  J Roark

Snake Bright Trail

Warblers and Mangrove Cuckoos frequent the trail in the morning hours while wading birds, shorebirds, and flamingos sometimes feed near the boardwalk at high tide.



Did You Know?

Soft-Shell Turtle

Soft-shell turtles may not have the protective hard covering seen on other turtles, but they make up for that with relatively greater speeds in the water. Also, their long noses are well adapted for snorkeling. These amazing animals seem perfectly built for a life in the Everglades!