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    Everglades

    National Park Florida

Bob Krumenaker Appointed Acting Superintendent

Bob Krumenaker new Acting Superintendent August 2014
Bob Krumenaker New Acting Superintendent Effective August 2014
National Park Service

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News Release Date: June 5, 2014
Contact: general park information, 305-242-7700
Contact: Media Contact Linda Friar, 305-242-7714

ATLANTA – Southeast Regional Director Stan Austin announced that Bob Krumenaker has been appointed as the next acting Superintendent for Everglades and Dry Tortugas National Parks, effective August 4.Krumenaker will replace the current acting superintendent, Shawn Benge who will return to his duties as deputy regional director in Atlanta.

"Bob is a seasoned park service leader and an experienced superintendent," Austin said."He will bring great leadership and energy to the Everglades and Dry Tortugas, until we complete the search for a permanent superintendent."

Krumenaker has 37 years of experience with the National Park Service (NPS).He has been superintendent of Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Wisconsin since 2002.He began his NPS career as a volunteer in 1977 and became a permanent employee in 1983.Some of his other assignments include:Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas, the NPS Washington Office, Isle Royale National Park in Michigan, Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, and Zion National Park in Utah.He also served as deputy superintendent of Valley Forge National Historical Park in Pennsylvania, and as deputy associate regional director for planning, resource stewardship, and science in the Northeast Regional Office in Philadelphia.

In a collateral capacity, Bob has served as the staff coordinator of the NPS Natural Resource Challenge (www.nature.nps.gov/challenge), an $80 million a year initiative to refocus the agency on resource preservation and management.He has also been part of an effort within the NPS to address the scientific and policy implications of climate change for parks, their gateway communities, and park users.In 2008 he was selected as the Midwest Region's Superintendent of the Year award for Natural Resources for his work in this area.

Krumenaker has worked for many years to strengthen the integration of natural and cultural resource management.He served for six years on the board of directors, and for two years as the president, of the George Wright Society (www.georgewright.org), an organization dedicated to the protection, preservation, and management of natural and cultural resources around the world.In 1995 he received the organization's Natural Resource Management Award "in recognition of his demonstrated leadership in natural resource management" within the NPS.He has written numerous articles and columns on park-related resource management issues.

Krumenaker received a Bachelor of Science degree from Brown University in 1979 and a master of forest science degree from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in 1982.He is a 2009 graduate of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government's Senior Executive Fellows Program.

"I am honored at the opportunity to be acting superintendent of two very different and important national parks in the Southeast Region," Krumenaker said."I think my strong background in natural and cultural resources and recent work on climate change and sustainability will be a good fit for these parks as they go through a management transition.I'm looking forward to carrying on the work that Deputy Regional Director Shawn Benge and former Superintendent Dan Kimball have put in place and to continue supporting the parks' dedicated staff, our many supporters, park neighbors and partner organizations to further public appreciation and long-term preservation of these special places."

 
 

Did You Know?

Soft-Shell Turtle

Soft-shell turtles may not have the protective hard covering seen on other turtles, but they make up for that with relatively greater speeds in the water. Also, their long noses are well adapted for snorkeling. These amazing animals seem perfectly built for a life in the Everglades!