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    Everglades

    National Park Florida

february 2009 art exhibit coe visitor center

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Date: February 4, 2009
Contact: Linda Friar, 305-242-7714

“The Endangered Everglades – Part II” exhibit at Everglades National Park

Donna Marxer, a veteran painter for 55 years, will exhibit her environmental works at the Ernest Coe Visitor’s Center gallery at Everglades National Park during the month of February, 2009.

Marxer, a former Floridian who is now a New York City-based artist, is a lifelong devotee of the Florida Everglades.  In 2001, in response to the passage of the Water Restoration Bill planned to resurrect the Glades, she founded “Artists In Residence In Everglades (AIRIE).  She says, “To mark that historic moment, and as one who respects this unique environment, I felt that it was important for artists and writers to be able to take part in these new beginnings.  With the cooperation of loyal Park employees, Everglades became the 28th National Park to offer artist residencies in the wilderness.”

Marxer herself became the first resident, who now number more than 50, to create in the Park, and the current exhibition represents Part II of a body of paintings that deal both with the great beauty and the threatened loss of this magnificent part of America,   Part I shown in 2008 dealt with small works; Part II in February 2009, exhibits larger pieces made during her residency and beyond.

“It is impossible for any landscape artist working today to ignore the effect of environmental change on our wilderness areas.  Because of its biological wealth, there is no greater example of this than the Florida Everglades.   These works address that change.”  Donna Marxer

“The Endangered Everglades – Part II” will take place at the Ernest Coe Visitors Center gallery, 40001 State Road 9336, Homestead, Florida, February 1 - 27, daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Admission is free.   

-EVER-

Did You Know?

Manatee and Baby Swimming

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