• Kendall Hills in summer bloom by Jeffrey Gibson

    Cuyahoga Valley

    National Park Ohio

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Search for Missing Woman Hillary K. Sharma Continues in Park, 8-26-2014

    Paddlers on the Cuyahoga R. are asked to report any out-of-the-ordinary items that they might see along the river between the Village of Boston and Station Rd in Brecksville. Sharma is 5’3”, 120 lbs, br hair/eyes. Have info? Call 440-546-5945. More »

  • Towpath Trail Closure

    Towpath Trail is closed from Mustill Store to Memorial Parkway for riverbank reinforcement. Detours posted. Closure will last 1 - 4 weeks into August. More »

  • Other Closures

    Valley Bridle Trail south of SR 303, across from golf course, is collapsed by river. Hard closure. Plateau Trail Bridge, north of Valley Picnic Area is closed. No detours. Plateau & Oak Hill trails are open. More »

  • Riverview Road Repaving

    Riverview Rd is being repaved from the Cuyahoga-Summit Cty line to Peninsula through Mon, 9/15. Road is open but there are still delays due to construction. Allow extra time. More »

Laws & Policies

CVNP Sign

©D.J. REISER


A number of laws and policies guide the management of Cuyahoga Valley National Park, starting with the enabling legislation that created the national park.



Park Creation

Enabling Legislation by U.S. Congress
December 27, 1974, P.L. 93-555 (Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area).
Managed by the National Park Service, a bureau of the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Name Change Legislation by U.S. Congress
October 11, 2000, P.L. 106-291 (Cuyahoga Valley National Park)


Legislative History
A Green Shrouded Miracle: The Administrative History of Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area, 1992


NPS Policies
For more information about the policies that guide the National Park Service as a whole, including Management Policies 2006 and specific policy topics, visit the NPS Office of Policy website.


Regulations
Park rangers enforce a number of federal regulations in the park, including the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 36 (36 CFR), and the United States Code, Titles 16, 18 and 21.

Within 36 CFR, park superintendents are granted the right to make park-specific regulations. The Superintendent's Compendium is the document that spells out Cuyahoga Valley National Park's regulations.


Permits
Certain types of activities require a special use permit, such as organized runs, bike rides, walks or horse rides, weddings, photography, filming, specimen collecting, and many other events. Visit our permits page for more information.


Firearms Regulations
Legislation: As of February 22, 2010, a new federal law allows people who can legally possess firearms under applicable federal, state, and local laws to legally possess firearms in this park. Refer to Section 512 of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, Public Law 111-24, 123 Stat. 1764-65.

Park User Responsibility: It is the responsibility of visitors to understand and comply with all applicable state, local, and federal firearm laws before entering this park. As a starting point, please visit our state's website: www.ohioattorneygeneral.gov/Enforcement/Concealed-Carry. Refer to the Ohio Revised Code for more information.

Weapons Prohibited in Federal Facilities: Federal law prohibits firearms in certain facilities in this park; those facilities are marked with signs at all public entrances. This includes, but is not limited to, Park Headquarters buildings, Happy Days Lodge, Canal Exploration Center, Boston Store Visitor Center, Peninsula Depot Visitor Center, and Hunt House. It is also illegal to possess firearms within the boundaries of the Cuyahoga Valley Environmental Education Center property. Refer to 18 U.S.C. § 930.

Hunting is Prohibited in the Park: Federal law prohibits hunting and the discharge of firearms in the park. Refer to 36 CFR 2.2(a)(1) and 36 CFR 2.4(a)(1)(iii).

Contact Information: Cuyahoga Valley National Park Chief Ranger's Office at (440) 546-5940 or (440) 546-5944

Did You Know?

Dragonfly image by NPS volunteer John Catalano.

Dragonflies and damselflies look almost alike while flying. However, if you wait until they land, dragonflies lay their wings to the side while damselflies lay them back and above their bodies.