• Kendall Hills in summer bloom by Jeffrey Gibson

    Cuyahoga Valley

    National Park Ohio

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  • Temporary Bridge Installed at Brandywine Creek

    A temporary bridge has been installed over Brandywine Creek and visitors will be able to complete the Brandywine Gorge Trail, during good weather. The bridge may be flooded and impassable during heavy rains. Caution signs are in place. More »

  • Towpath Trail Closures

    Towpath Trail is closed from Mustill Store to Memorial Parkway for riverbank reinforcement. Detours posted. Closure will last 1 - 4 weeks into August. More »

  • Other Closures

    Valley Bridle Trail south of SR 303, across from golf course, is collapsed by river. Hard closure. Plateau Trail Bridge, north of Valley Picnic Area is closed. No detours. Plateau & Oak Hill trails are open. More »

  • Road Closures

    Quick Rd is closed from Akron Peninsula Rd to Pine Hollow Trailhead in Peninsula, from Wednesday, 7/16, for 6 weeks. Detours posted. Hines Hill Rd is closed from Tuesday, 7/29 through Tuesday, 8/12 for resurfacing from I271 to the Boston Township Line. More »

  • Riverview Road Repaving and Closure

    Riverview Rd is being repaved from the Cuyahoga-Summit Cty line to Peninsula through Mon, 9/15.Road is open with single lane closures. Riverview Rd is closed from Boston Mills Rd to the Cuyahoga Cty line starting Mon, 7/14 for for 3 weeks. Detours posted. More »

Amphibians

Frog in CVNP

Frogs live in the park's wetlands.

©JERRY JELINEK

Amphibians (frogs, toads, and salamanders) are an important part of the ecological balance of many habitats. They are like sponges, soaking up water and air through their skin. Anything found in their environment becomes a part of them, making them prone to localized sources of contamination. They are, therefore, good indicators of environmental health. Current research efforts are ongoing to identify and quantify threats to amphibian populations and to provide useful information to park managers on environmental conditions.

An early study identified nine species of salamanders, eight species of frogs, and one toad in CVNP. Most of these species can be heard or seen along remnants of the Ohio & Erie Canal that run the length of the park and in many of the wetlands and ponds that dot the landscape. A short walk on the Towpath Trail on a late spring morning allows visitors to hear the quick "peep-peep-peep" of the spring peeper or the low resonant "rumm-rumm-rumm" of the bullfrog. The park's salamanders are harder to find, hidden in the forest near small temporary ponds or other wet depressions. Occasionally, however, migrations of salamanders are observed during rainy spring nights as they cross roadways to reach their breeding ponds.

 
Spotted salamander

Spotted salamanders migrate to breeding pools in early spring.

COURTESY ODNR

Park staff and volunteers have monitored frogs and marsh birds since 1995 as part of a long term Marsh Monitoring Program (MMP). The MMP established by Bird Studies Canada and Environment Canada in 1994 is a bi-national, long term monitoring program that coordinates the skills, interests, and stewardship of hundreds of citizens across the Great Lakes Basin to help understand, monitor, and conserve the region's wetlands and their amphibian and bird inhabitants. The program receives support from Environment Canada, U.S. Great Lakes Protection Fund, U.S. Environmental Protection Fund, and Great Lakes 2000 Cleanup Fund.

The MMP has been monitoring trends in marsh birds and calling amphibians using data provided by more than 600 volunteer participants. Recent population trends for certain Great Lakes marsh birds appear to be emerging. Pied-billed Grebe and Common Moorhen, which require more “pristine” wetland conditions appear to be declining across the Great Lakes basin, while wetland generalist species commonly found along wetland edges (e.g., common yellowthroat, yellow warbler) are increasing. These results suggest habitat fragmentation and degradation are occurring throughout the region. MMP data also showed that most Great Lakes frog and toad species are declining, which further highlights the need for wetland conservation and restoration. Visit the MMP on the web at www.birdscanada.org/mmpmain.html.

Marsh birds and frogs are monitored at five sites in the park as part of this long term monitoring project. Marsh birds are monitored twice each spring using broadcast calling surveys. Frogs are monitored three times each spring using point counts.

CVNP Amphibians List 2009

See also the CVNP Fish List 2009.

Did You Know?

Drawing of a mule driver on the Ohio & Erie Canal.

A young James A. Garfield, 20th President of the United States, worked briefly as a mule boy on the Ohio & Erie Canal, an important cultural resource within Cuyahoga Valley National Park.