• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Volunteers Sought for the Bodie Island Lighthouse

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Date: June 18, 2007
Contact: Outer Banks Group, (252) 473-2111

Once the current stabilization project at the Bodie Island Lighthouse is completed later this summer, the National Park Service hopes to open the base of the structure for public viewing. The tower itself, however, will not be open for climbing. In anticipation of opening the lighthouse base, Cape Hatteras National Seashore staff are seeking those interested in joining a team of lighthouse volunteers.

"We need to have staff in the lighthouse base when it is open to the public," stated Mike Murray, Superintendent, Outer Banks Group. "This is a great volunteer opportunity and one that can provide a significant experience for our visitors – visiting lighthouses rates among the top five activities that visitors choose to do while staying on the Outer Banks."

Volunteers will greet visitors who wish to view the old oil house and gaze up the spiraling cast iron stair case of the 1873 tower. They will share stories of the history of the light station as well as explain plans of future restoration projects, including a major repair of the 205 steps anticipated to begin in 2009.

Those interested in donating their time are asked commit a minimum of four hours per week during the summer season. Training and uniforms will be provided. To learn more about this exciting volunteer opportunity, please contact Marcia Lyons at (252) 995-4474 x21.

The Bodie Island Lighthouse is on the National Register of Historic Places. It is located a short distance south of Nags Head in a quiet and picturesque setting, adjacent to a freshwater pond and the old light keepers’ dwelling that currently serves as a Seashore visitor center.

Did You Know?

Ocracoke Inlet was one of the most heavily traveled inlets in the 1700s.

In the 1700s, Ocracoke Inlet was one of the busiest inlets in the East. It was one of the few navigable waterways for ships accessing inland ports such as Elizabeth City, Edenton or New Bern. It was here that Blackbeard the pirate found the inlet's heavy shipping traffic ripe for easy pickings.