• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

USGS Publishes Open File Report on Management Recommendations

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Date: March 24, 2010
Contact: Cyndy Holda, 252-473-2111 ext. 148

The National Park Service (NPS) was notified today that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has published A Review and Synthesis of the Scientific Information Related to the Biology and Management of Species of Special Concern at Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina, 100 page report, by Jonathan B. Cohen and others.  The report is available on the USGS website at:  http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2009/1262/

The previously released 2005 USGS management, monitoring, and protection protocols for threatened and endangered species and species of special concern at Cape Hatteras remain posted on the NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment (PEPC) website (under the Interim Protected Species Management Strategy document list; document name starts with "2006 03Mar 02...") at: http://parkplanning.nps.gov/document.cfm?parkID=358&projectId=13331&documentID=12970

For more information, contact Anne-Berry Wade, USGS Eastern Region Communications Chief, at (phone) 703-648-4483 or (email) abwade@usgs.gov.

Did You Know?

This artist's rendering shows the U.S.S. Monitor foundering in a storm off of Cape Hatteras in December 1862.

The U.S.S. Monitor sank off Cape Hatteras during a storm in December 1862. The wreck's location was a mystery until 1973 when a research vessel found the ship 16 miles off the cape in 230 feet of water. In 1975, the Monitor was named the nation’s first National Marine Sanctuary.