• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Park to Establish Pre-nesting Areas for 2008 Breeding Season

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Date: March 21, 2008
Contact: Outer Banks Group, (252) 473-2111 ext 148

 

Outer Banks Group Superintendent Mike Murray announced today that National Park Service (NPS) staff will begin establishing pre-nesting areas for piping plovers at Cape Hatteras National Seashore beginning the week of March 24th in accordance with the Interim Protected Species Management Strategy.

 

The areas to be posted are based on breeding areas used in the past three years and a recent habitat assessment conducted by Seashore natural resource staff to adapt the closures to current conditions.  These temporary closures will be installed on sections of the Bodie Island Spit, Cape Point, SouthBeach, Hatteras Spit, North Ocracoke and Ocracoke South Point prior to April 1.  To the extent possible at these sites, the NPS will maintain an off-road vehicle (ORV) corridor or alternate route to maintain access to popular fishing and recreation areas.  The pre-nesting areas will be marked with “symbolic fencing” consisting of wooden posts, bird usage signs, string and flagging tape.

 

“The pre-nesting areas are critically important early in the breeding season to allow protected birds relatively undisturbed habitat to define territories, find a mate, forage for food, and establish nest sites, “ said Superintendent Murray. “I have personally reviewed and approved the configuration for this year’s closures.  It is to the benefit of both the birds and park visitors that the birds are given the best opportunity to successfully establish nests early in the season, which will increase the likelihood that piping plover breeding activity is completed before peak summer visitation begins in July.”

 

Dates and locations for the installation of specific pre-nesting areas will be determined by prevailing weather and tide conditions.  Members of the park management team will be on-site during the installation of the closures to answer questions from visitors and residents.

 

 

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Lightning whelks are one of the few species of

Lightning whelks eat about one large clam per month. The whelk pries the clam open with its muscular foot, wedges the clam open with its shell, then eats the soft inside of the clam. Lightning whelk shells, which whorl to the left, wash up on the beach at Cape Hatteras National Seashore.