• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Know Your Park - Torpedo Junction - Shipwrecks of WWI and WWII

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Date: January 7, 2010
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-473-2111

Release Date: January 6, 2009

Contact: Outer Banks Group

Phone: (252) 473-2111

 

Know Your Park:  Torpedo Junction - Shipwrecks of WWI and WWII

Presentation to be held at Salvo Volunteer Fire Station

 

The National Park Service Outer Banks Group Know Your Park citizen science program series continues with a presentation from Joe Hoyt from the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary on Wednesday, January 20 at 7:00 p.m. at the Salvo Volunteer Fire Station.  The program is free and will last approximately 1 hour.

 

Hoyt will speak about his work just off the coast of the Outer Banks including his findings in a recent exploration of the HMT Bedfordshire and other World War I and II vessels.

 

Mr. Hoyt is a maritime archaeologist serving as a field technician and researcher for the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary.  He has worked on several NOAA projects in the Thunder Bay, Florida Keys and Monitor National Marine Sanctuaries since 2001.  He has worked on underwater archaeology projects in the Great Lakes, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and several inland rivers.  Hoyt is also an avid photographer and diver, and has crewed documentary expeditions on BBC's Planet Earth and PBS.  Hoyt holds an MA in maritime history and underwater archaeology from East Carolina University's Program in Maritime Studies. 

 

The Know Your Park citizen science program series is designed to further connect the Outer Banks communities and residents with the rich natural world and cultural heritage of their neighboring National Park sites; Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Wright Brothers National Memorial and Fort Raleigh National Historic Site.  “These presentations offer park visitors as well as local residents an opportunity to learn more about, and better enjoy, the coastal environment and their National Parks” stated Mike Murray, Superintendent, Outer Banks Group.

Did You Know?

Sea Whip, though it looks like a plant, is actually whole colony of animals.

A piece of sea whip that washes up on the beach at Cape Hatteras National Seashore is not a plant, but the skeleton of a whole colony of animals. A tiny animal lived in each hole on the yellow, orange or purple stems. It had a mouth, a stomach and eight tentacles to catch food.