• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

CAPE HATTERAS NATIONAL SEASHORE PARTNERS WITH NOAA

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: July 24, 2006
Contact: Outer Banks Group, (252) 473-2111

Cape Hatteras National Seashore recently partnered with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to aid them in broadcasting video of their latest project on the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary.  NOAA, in conjunction with the Institute for Exploration, conducted a mapping expedition of the wreck of the USS Monitor in order to create a photographic mosaic of the wreckage as it exists today. 

 

As a part of the expedition, NOAA transmitted live video feeds which included live footage of the wreck site, interviews, and answering questions from the general public.  In order to do this, the Seashore provided NOAA’s staff with a location for the satellite antenna as well as electricity, DSL, and phone lines for their remote vehicle.  “We are always happy to partner with other agencies when feasible,” stated National Park Service Superintendent Mike Murray.  “By providing NOAA with the essentials to transmit their live broadcasts, our staff helped NOAA to further its objective to educate the public about the significance of shipwrecks.  This is also an important aspect of our mission at Cape Hatteras National Seashore.”

 

The Monitor, one of the world’s first ironclad warships, sank in a gale 16.1 miles south- southeast of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse in 230 feet of water on December 31, 1862.  The ship was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 and it became the first National Marine Sanctuary in 1975.  The wreck of the Monitor is important as both a cultural site and an artificial reef.  For more information on the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary and NOAA’s latest work on the site, check out http://www.sanctuaries.noaa.gov/missions/2006monitor/welcome.html.

Did You Know?

Seasparkle, a tiny dinoflagellate that can be seen glowing in the surfline at night.

The beaches along Cape Hatteras National Seashore sparkle at night. When you kick the sand, you disturb tiny dinoflagellates like seasparkle, magnified in the picture to the left. A chemical reaction causes them to glow with a blue-green light.