• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Cape Hatteras National Seashore Impacts of Strong Surf Conditions

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Date: August 21, 2009
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-473-2111 ext. 148

As Hurricane Bill passes east of the Outer Banks of North Carolina, the National Weather Service is predicting the coastal waters and beaches will experience the effects of the storm beginning in the afternoon hours of August 21, 2009.  Heavy surf conditions, with unusually high waves and dangerous rip currents, are predicted over the weekend with possible ocean overwash and flooding of roadways.

During periods of high tides, which will occur on Friday night at 8:51 p.m., Saturday morning at 9:22 a.m., Saturday night at 9:38 p.m., and Sunday morning at 10:11 a.m., the beaches of Cape Hatteras National Seashore will be closed to off-road vehicles due to unsafe conditions.  Beaches are subject to high wave action, erosion, and unpredictable wind conditions.  Shorelines will experience strong ocean rip currents making water activities extremely dangerous and park visitors are encouraged to stay out of the water until the storm passes and surf conditions improve.

All park beach access ramps will be closed to off-road vehicles by 6:00 p.m., August 21, 2009.  All National Park Service campgrounds and park visitor centers will remain open until further notice.

For more information, visit http://www.nws.noaa.gov/

Did You Know?

The Hatteras Island Weather Station is one of only three remaining weather stations in the country.

The U.S. Weather Bureau Station on Hatteras Island was built in 1901 and was one of 11 stations built around the country. It is one of only three remaining stations nationwide, and the only one in the nation restored to its 1901 condition. The station was reopened in 2007 to house a visitor center.