• Farming in the canyon

    Canyon De Chelly

    National Monument Arizona

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  • Fee Collection for Backcountry Permits

    Navajo Nation Parks & Recreation Dept (NPRD) has a new office at the Cottonwood Campground. NPRD who manages the canyon tour operations will be collecting fees for the backcountry permits starting May 1, 2014. Call NPRD at 928-674-2106 for information.

History & Culture

Antelope House Ruin

Antelope House Ruin

THE PLACE CALLED TSEYI'

Millions of years of land uplifts and stream cutting created the colorful sheer cliff walls of Canyon de Chelly. Natural water sources and rich soil provided a variety of resources, including plants and animals that have sustained families for thousands of years. The Ancient Puebloans found the canyons an ideal place to plant crops and raise families. The first settlers built pit houses that were then replaced with more sophisticated homes as more families migrated to the area. More homes were built in alcoves to take advantage of the sunlight and natural protection. People thrived until the mid-1300’s when the Puebloans left the canyons to seek better farmlands.

 
Navajos in the canyon

Navajos in the canyon

Descendants of the Puebloans, the Hopi migrated into the canyons to plant fields of corn and orchards of peaches. Although the Hopi left this area to permanently settle on the mesa tops to the west, the Hopi still hold on to many of their traditions that are evident from their homes and kivas.

Related to the Athabaskan people of Northern Canada and Alaska, the Navajo settled the Southwest between the four sacred mountains. The Navajo, or Dine' as they call themselves, continue to raise families and plant crops just as the “Ancient Ones” had. The farms, livestock and hogans of the Dine’ are visible from the canyon rims.

 
Park Ranger on horseback

Park Ranger on horseback

Canyon de Chelly National Monument was authorized in 1931 by President Herbert Hoover in large measure to preserve the important archeological resources that span more than 4,000 years of human occupation. The monument encompasses approximately 84,000 acres of lands located entirely on the Navajo Nation with roughly 40 families residing within the park boundaries. The National Park Service and the Navajo Nation share resources and continue to work in partnership to manage this special place.
 
Administrative History of Canyon de Chelly, published in 1976. (PDF)

Did You Know?

White House Ruin

Canyon de Chelly National Monument is comprised entirely of Navajo tribal trust land with a resident community within the canyons. A backcountry permit and authorized guide are required to enter the canyon except for the White House Trail.