• Farming in the canyon

    Canyon De Chelly

    National Monument Arizona

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  • Fee Collection for Backcountry Permits

    Navajo Nation Parks & Recreation Dept (NPRD) has a new office at the Cottonwood Campground. NPRD who manages the canyon tour operations will be collecting fees for the backcountry permits starting May 1, 2014. Call NPRD at 928-674-2106 for information.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is there a fee to enter the park?

No, the park is a non-fee area. Donations are appreciated and can be made at the visitor center.

Do I need a guide or backcountry permit for the North or South Rim Drives?

No, the North and South Rim Drives plus the White House Trail are self-guided activities you can do without a guide or backcountry permit. The rim drives and trail are open all year long.

Do I have to make reservations for the campground?

No, the Cottonwood Campground is managed by the Navajo Parks and Recreation Department (NPRD) and individual campsites are available first-come, first-serve. Please contact NPRD directly at (928)674-2106 for camping rates and availability. Keep in mind there is limited services in the winter.

Are pets allowed in the park?

Pets on a leash are welcome on the North and South Rim Drives and in the campground. Pets are not permitted down the White House Trail or on any canyon tours. Exceptions are made for service animals.

Can I drive off-road on my own?

No, the Navajo Nation has many dirt roads, but be mindful that these roads are for access to private residences or grazing areas. There are no public recreational areas for off-road vehicles, dirt bikes, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) or bicycles. There are no established areas in the park for off-road travel; travel into the canyon requires a guide and backcountry permit.

What should I know before visiting the Navajo Nation?

Please visit the website at http://www.navajonationparks.org/permits.htm for regulations regarding visiting other areas on the Navajo Nation. Note that rock climbing, base jumping or scattering of ashes are not permitted.

Indian Route 7 is not recommended to access the park because it is partially unpaved and unmaintained. GPS and cell phone services are unreliable.

Did You Know?

Spider Rock

The name of Canyon de Chelly was derived from the misspelling and mispronunciation of the Navajo word for the canyon. The Navajos call the canyon "Tseyi" which is pronounced 'say-ee.' Eventually the word became "de Chelly" which is pronounced as 'de-shay'