• Red cliffs descend into the water of Bighorn Canyon

    Bighorn Canyon

    National Recreation Area MT,WY

Boating

Boating_-_Eye_of_the_Eagle1 resize

Boating on Bighorn Lake near Eye of the Eagle

Sharon Genaux

Boating
Boating, kayaking, and canoeing are all excellent ways to enjoy the colors and scenic beauty of Bighorn Canyon.

REMINDER FOR RECREATIONAL BOATERS

No person shall operate a power driven vessel using a tow rope 20 feet or less in length when towing a person. In addition, operating a power driven vessel with a person sitting, riding, or hanging onto a swim platform or ladder is prohibited.


Marinas
Ok-A-Beh Marina

The Ok-A-Beh Marina is located near Fort Smith, Montana and offers boaters a variety of amenities. To learn more click here...

Horseshoe Bend Marina


The Horseshoe Bend Marina is near Lovell, Wyoming and is fully stocked to take care of boaters needs. To learn more click here...

More information about boating the southern portion of Bighorn Lake can be obtained from the Friends of Bighorn Lake website at: www.bighornlake.com

Boat Tours
n Treasure Charters offers scenic boat tours of Bighorn Canyon throughout the summer season! To learn more click here...


Registers
Boating registers are located at Ok-A-Beh, Barry’s Landing, and Horseshoe Bend. For your boating safety, please sign the register prior to your departure and upon your return. The information on the register will assist us in locating you if necessary. If your boat stalls, NEVER attempt to climb out of the canyon. Stay with your craft until help arrives.

Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS)
Aquatic invasive species are non-native organisms that can cause significant harm to an ecosystem when introduced. Aquatic invasive species like quagga mussels and zebra mussels are small organisms that could have huge impacts for Montana and Wyoming waters, boaters, and anglers. They can ruin fisheries, clog cooling systems in motorboats, foul hulls, and ruin equipment. Click on the links below for more information...

Aquatic Invasive Species Background - Frequently Asked Questions

Aquatic Invasive Species Watercraft Inspection and Decontamination - Frequently Asked Questions

Aquatic Invasive Species - Wyoming Decals FAQs

Zebra Mussels - What Boaters Should Know

Driftwood
Watch for driftwood on Bighorn Lake. It can injure a skier and damage your boat’s lower unit. Be prepared: carry a spare prop and shear pins.

Requirements
A special permit is not required to operate on Bighorn Lake; however, boats must display valid registrations for the state in which they are registered. Vessels must carry appropriate lights for operating between sunset and sunrise, clean and operating flame arrester, proper ventilations, muffling system and a valid certificate of numbers.

Depending on the type of boat, sound-producing devices and fire extinguishers may be required. A Coast Guard approved, personal flotation device in good and serviceable condition, and of appropriate size for the intended user is required for each person on board.

Watercraft 16 feet and over (except canoes and kayaks in Montana) must also have a type IV throwable PFD on board and immediately available for use. In Montana and Wyoming, children under 12 must wear a PFD on boats less than 26 feet that are in motion.

Detailed state and federal regulations are at visitor centers and ranger stations. A Boating map of Bighorn lake is available by clicking here.

Did You Know?

Crow Tipi Village, photo by A. Wolf

The Crow Reservation was established by the Treaty of 1851. Today the reservation encompasses approximately 2.2 million acres, largest in the state of Montana. This is 2 1/2 times the acreage of the state of Rhode Island. More...