History & Culture

Wupatki National Monument was established by President Calvin Coolidge on December 9, 1924, to preserve Citadel and Wupatki pueblos. Monument boundaries have been adjusted several times since then, and now include additional pueblos and other archeological resources on a total of 35,422 acres.

Wupatki represents a cultural crossroads, home to numerous groups of people over thousands of years. Understanding of earlier people comes from multiple perspectives, including the traditional history of the people themselves and interpretations by archeologists of structures and artifacts that remain. You can explore both through the links on this page.



From hunter-gatherers to farmers, herders, ranchers, and caretakers, many people have called Wupatki home.


For its time and place, there was no other pueblo like Wupatki. Less than 800 years ago, it was the tallest, largest, and perhaps the richest and most influential pueblo around.


What happened to prehistoric clothing that was excavated from NPS archeological sites in northern Arizona in the 1930s?

Museum Collection

Click here to explore the National Park Service Artifact and Image site.

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

6400 U.S. 89
Flagstaff, AZ 86004


(928) 679-2365
Phones are answered during visitor center hours between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. MST. Phone service at Wupatki is affected by storms and strong winds and may be intermittent.

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