Convention Days

Save the Date: Convention Days 2020
Legacy of our Foremothers
Friday, Saturday & Sunday, July 17, 18 & 19, 2020

 
 
Portrait of Elizabeth Cady Stanton with Convention Days stamp
 

Celebrate Convention Days Navigation

 

Join us for our annual commemoration of the 1848 Women’s Rights Convention! Convention Days 2019 offers a unique opportunity to set the stage for the upcoming centennial of the 19th Amendment in 2020. This year's theme, "Back to Our Roots," will focus on the early days of the women's rights movement and the factors that fed into its development.

Welcome Ceremony

Keynote speaker: Coline Jenkins, great-great-granddaughter of Elizabeth Cady Stanton
The Welcome Ceremony will begin at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 20th. Acting Superintendent Catherine Bragaw will give welcoming words, Dr. Melinda Grube, as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Renee-Noelle Felice, as Lucretia Mott, will read the Declaration of Sentiments, and Coline Jenkins, great-great granddaughter of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, will give the keynote address.

 
People outdoors at Women's Rights National Historical Park
2018 Convention Days

NPS Photo

 

Friday, July 19, 2019

Open Hours

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m Visitor Center Tour the exhibits, talk to a Ranger, and pick up a Convention Days schedule!

9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Wesleyan Chapel: Walk in the Place Where it All Began Visit the historic chapel that hosted the 1848 Woman's Rights Convention.

10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. M’Clintock House: Radical Hospitality Visit inside the home of Mary Ann and Thomas M’Clintock.

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Stanton House: Center of the Rebellion Visit the home Elizabeth Cady Stanton called the Center of the Rebellion.

Special Programs

9:30 a.m. Revolutionary Roots (Visitor Center, 45 minutes) Discover how five women changed the course of history in 1848. Stops may include the First Wave statue, Waterwall, and Wesleyan Chapel.

10:00 a.m. "Was Seneca Falls Really the Beginning of the Women's Suffrage Movement?" with Judith Wellman (Guntzel Theater, 45 minutes) Former Park Historian Judith Wellman discusses how Seneca Falls inspired a revolution.

11:00 a.m. Revolutionary Roots (Visitor Center, 45 minutes) Discover how five women changed the course of history in 1848. Stops may include the First Wave statue, Waterwall, and Wesleyan Chapel.

11:00 a.m. Calling on Stanton and Mott (Stanton House, 45 minutes) Historical dialogues on women's rights and women's suffrage featuring Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott.

11:30 a.m. "Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Racist?" with Laura Free (Guntzel Theater, 45 minutes) Grapple with the complicated race and gender politics that Elizabeth engaged with throughout her life.

11:30 a.m. A Man Amongst Women (M'Clintock House, 45 minutes) Hear from the most prominent man in attendance at the 1848 convention, Frederick Douglass.

12:30 p.m. Revolutionary Roots (Visitor Center, 45 minutes) Discover how five women changed the course of history in 1848. Stops may include the First Wave statue, Waterwall, and Wesleyan Chapel.

1:00 p.m. Calling on Stanton and Mott (Stanton House, 45 minutes) Historical dialogues on women's rights and women's suffrage featuring Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott.

1:30 p.m. “Ramping up for Suffrage Centennial” with Coline Jenkins (Guntzel Theater, 45 minutes) What if we built monuments to famous women like we do for famous men? Coline Jenkins is trying to do just that.

1:30 p.m. A Man Amongst Women (M'Clintock House, 45 minutes) Hear from the most prominent man in attendance at the 1848 convention, Frederick Douglas.

2:00 p.m. Digging into the Past (Stanton House, 45 minutes) Join us for an archeological tour of the Stanton property to learn what we have unearthed, and what we can learn about the past through archeological digs.

2:15 p.m. "A Most Important Conversation: Racial Divides and Accountability within the Women's Suffrage Movement" with Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner (Guntzel Theater, 45 minutes) Dr. Roesch Wagner discusses her newly published work with a focus on race.

2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Children's Activity: Make Stanton Sunflowers (Visitor Center, drop-in program) Join a craft session in tribute to Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

3:00 p.m. "Why Seneca Falls?" with Walter Gable (Guntzel Theater, 45 minutes) Trace how developments in transportation, economic growth, various reform movements, and actions of key individuals and groups can explain why the first woman’s rights convention took place in Seneca Falls.

3:00 p.m. Calling on Stanton and Mott (Stanton House, 45 minutes) Historical dialogues on women's rights and women's suffrage featuring Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott.

4:00 p.m. “Equality of Rights” (Wesleyan Chapel, 1 hour) Join Yesteryear Productions in celebrating the birth of the women's rights movement at the site of the actual Seneca Falls Women's Rights Convention.
 

Saturday, July 20, 2019

*ASL Interpreters will be onsite for a selection of Saturday programs. These programs are noted in the descriptions.

Open Hours

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m Visitor Center Tour the exhibits, talk to a Ranger, and pick up a Convention Days schedule!

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Wesleyan Chapel: Walk in the Place Where it All Began Visit the historic chapel that hosted the 1848 Woman's Rights Convention.

12:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. M’Clintock House: Radical Hospitality Visit inside the home of Mary Ann and Thomas M’Clintock.

12:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Stanton House: Center of the Rebellion Visit the home Elizabeth Cady Stanton called the Center of the Rebellion.

Special Programs

6:00 a.m. Yoga in Your Park (Declaration Park, 1 hour) Grab a mat or towel and join Courtney from New Life Yoga for a all-level yoga class held at Declaration Park. Beginners are welcome! Waivers are required.

8:00 a.m. Right to Run 5k / 19k This annual run is taking place on the south side of town. Visit RighttoRun19k.org for more information.

9:30 a.m. Women's Suffrage March (Starts at Stanton House, 40 minutes, 1 mile walk) March from Elizabeth Cady Stanton's home to the Wesleyan Chapel. Dressing in period attire is encouraged. Coordinated by Convention Days, Inc. Particiapant will gather at 9:00 a.m. The march steps off at 9:30 a.m.

9:30 a.m. Revolutionary Roots (Visitor Center, 45 minutes, ASL Accessible) Discover how five women changed the course of history in 1848. Stops may include the First Wave statue, Waterwall, and Wesleyan Chapel.

10:30 a.m. Welcome Ceremony (Wesleyan Chapel, 45 minutes, ASL Accessible) Join us for a greeting from the National Park Service, a reading of the Declaration of Sentiments by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, and the keynote address by Coline Jenkins.

11:15 a.m. Welcome to the Centennial of the 19th Amendment (Wesleyan Chapel, 1 hour, ASL Accessible) Coline Jenkins and Friends kick off the Centennial of the 19th Amendment.

12:30 p.m. Revolutionary Roots with special guests Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and Frederick Douglass (Visitor Center, 45 minutes, ASL Accessible) Discover how five women changed the course of history in 1848. Stops may include the First Wave statue, Waterwall, and Wesleyan Chapel.

1:00 p.m. Trivia with Friends (Guntzel Theater, 45 minutes) Join the Friends of Women’s Rights National Historical Park and test your knowledge of women’s rights trivia using Kahoot!

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m Take Stanton Home (Visitor Center, drop-in program) Join local artist Sandra Shutter and create your own miniature Elizabeth Cady Stanton or Lucretia Mott.

1:00 p.m. Digging into the Past (Stanton House, 45 minutes) Join us for an archeological tour of the Stanton property to learn what we have unearthed, and what we can learn about the past through archeological digs.

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Strawberry Stroll for Harriet Tubman (Auburn, New York) Celebrate Harriet Tubman's work for women's suffrage with events at the Equal Rights Heritage Center, Fort Hill Cemetery, and Seward House Gardens.

1:30 p.m. “The Famous Friendship of Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass” with Carol Faulkner (Wesleyan Chapel, 45 minutes, ASL Accessible) This presentation illuminates the long friendship of Douglass and Anthony, and its consequences for the strained relationship between the antislavery and women’s rights movements after the Civil War.

1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Children's Activity: "What do you fight for" Suffrage Buttons (Visitor Center, drop-in program) Show the world what is important to you! Join local youth volunteers to create your own suffrage button.

2:00 p.m. “Quaker Meetinghouse Architecture: Religion Reflected in Form” with Laura Densmore (Guntzel Theater, 45 minutes) Laura Densmore, photographer, has turned her lens on Delaware Valley Quaker Meetinghouses.

2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Ladies Vintage Baseball: Brooks Grove Belles vs. Priscilla Porters (Stanton House, 2 hours, drop-in program) Genesee Country Village and Museum brings us an interactive baseball game featuring period costumes, and 1866 rules. Join in the fun and maybe even see an outfielder catch a ball in her apron!

2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. The First Presbyterian Church of Seneca Falls Open House Docent guided tour of the site where Alice Paul called for the Equal Rights Amendment.

2:30 p.m. Chapel Chat with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott (Wesleyan Chapel, 45 minutes, ASL Accessible) Historical dialogues on women's rights and women's suffrage.

2:30 p.m. A Man Amongst Women (M'Clintock House, 45 minutes) Hear from the most prominent man in attendance at the 1848 Convention, Frederick Douglass.

3:00 p.m. “Before Seneca Falls: Lucretia Mott and the Sisterhood of Reforms” with Christopher Densmore (Guntzel Theater, 45 minutes, ASL Accessible) This presentation describes how Lucretia Mott inspired women and men to find a voice through speaking, writing, organizing and petitioning in the decades before the Seneca Falls Convention.

4:00 p.m. “Equality of Rights” (Wesleyan Chapel, 1 hour) Join Yesteryear Productions in celebrating the birth of the women's rights movement at the site of the actual Seneca Falls Women's Rights Convention.

 

Sunday, July 21, 2019

Open Hours

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m Visitor Center Tour the exhibits, talk to a Ranger, and pick up a Convention Days schedule!

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Wesleyan Chapel: Walk in the Place Where it All Began Visit the historic chapel that hosted the 1848 Woman's Rights Convention.

10:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. M’Clintock House: Radical Hospitality Visit inside the home of Mary Ann and Thomas M’Clintock.

10:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Stanton House: Center of the Rebellion Visit the home Elizabeth Cady Stanton called the Center of the Rebellion.

Special Programs

9:30 a.m. Revolutionary Roots (Visitor Center, 45 minutes) Discover how five women changed the course of history in 1848. Stops may include the First Wave statue, Waterwall, and Wesleyan Chapel.


10:00 a.m. Equality Doesn't Look the Same for Everyone (M'Clintock House, 45 minutes) Historical dialogues on abolition and suffrage from two iconic activists: Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth.

11:00 a.m. Revolutionary Roots (Visitor Center, 45 minutes) Discover how five women changed the course of history in 1848. Stops may include the First Wave statue, Waterwall, and Wesleyan Chapel.

11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Take Stanton Home (Visitor Center, drop-in program) Join local artist Sandra Shutter and create your own miniature Elizabeth Cady Stanton or Lucretia Mott.

11:00 a.m. Calling on Stanton and Mott (Stanton House, 45 minutes) Historical dialogues on women's rights and women's suffrage.

12:00 p.m. "Descendants' Social Hour" hosted by Friends of Women's Rights National Historical Park (Visitor Center, 45 minutes) A gathering opportunity for descendants of the signers of the Declaration of Sentiments to meet, socialize, and network.

12:00 p.m. If These Walls Could Talk (Wesleyan Chapel, 45 minutes) Listen in on conversations between Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, Lucretia Mott, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

1:00 p.m. Revolutionary Roots (Visitor Center, 45 minutes) Discover how five women changed the course of history in 1848. Stops may include the First Wave statue, Waterwall, and Wesleyan Chapel.

1:00 p.m. Equality Doesn't Look the Same for Everyone (Stanton House, 45 minutes) Historical dialogues on abolition and suffrage from two iconic activists: Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth.

1:30 p.m. “SHOUT! Poetry for Suffrage” with Susanna Rich (Guntzel Theater, 45 minutes) Emmy-Award nominee Susanna Rich reads her original poetry. Written from the points of view of a wide range of key figures these poems inspire and galvanize.

1:30 p.m. Calling on Stanton and Mott (M'Clintock House, 45 minutes) Historical dialogues on women's rights and women's suffrage.

2:00 p.m. “Votes for Women: Why Did it Take So Long?” with Susan Goodier (Wesleyan Chapel, 45 minutes) Why did it take so long for women to win the right to vote in New York, and in the United States? An acceptance of women’s right to political engagement, including the right to vote, required changing perceptions about who we are and the place we live.

3:00 p.m. Revolutionary Roots (Visitor Center, 45 minutes) Discover how five women changed the course of history in 1848. Stops may include the First Wave statue, Waterwall, and Wesleyan Chapel.

3:00 p.m. Multi-Faith Forum (Guntzel Theater, 1 hour 15 minutes) A panel of speakers from some of the world’s major faiths including Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam, speak about the relevance of the 1848 Women’s Rights Convention to their religious tradition. Afterwards, join a lively Question and Answer session to share your own visions and views.
 

Volunteer at the Event


Volunteer to bring women's rights to life! Convention Days has been a signature event in Seneca Falls for many years. We would not be able to keep this event going without the work of dedicated volunteers.

Volunteers are needed to assist with set-up and break-down, with staffing the information booth and visitor services desk, assisting speakers and performers, and to assist with children’s activities. Shifts are two - three hours long and can be geared towards your interest.

If you are interested in volunteering please contact Denise DeLucia at 315-568-2991 x3004 or at denise_delucia@nps.gov.
 

Getting Around

Get Directions and look at some Maps to help you navigate the event.

Parking

Many streets around town allow street parking. In addition to street parking, there are several lots in the area that are within walking distance to the park. Please obey all parking signs and restrictions.

The parking lot behind the Visitor Center will be reserved for handicap parking for the duration of Convention Days. The street spots directly in front of the Visitor Center and Wesleyan Chapel will be blocked for loading and pedestrian safety.

The following lots will be available on Saturday, July 20 for public parking:

  • Mynderse Academy High School (105 Troy Street)
  • Seneca Falls Middle School Back Lot (where Mynderse Street dead-ends at school)
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton Elementary (38 Garden Street; Front & Back Lots)
  • Municipal Lot (near 19 Cayuga Street; between Chemung Canal & Generations Bank)

Shuttles (Saturday Only)

Mynderse Shuttle (105 Troy Street): Shuttles to and from Mynderse Academy will run to and from the Clinton Street side of the Women’s Rights National Historical Park. Shuttles will run continuously between 6:45 a.m. and 2:15 p.m. on Saturday, July 20.

Generations Shuttle (20 East Bayard Street): The one-way shuttle will run from the Women’s Rights National Historical Park to the Generations Bank HQ at 12:30 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. only.

Visit RighttoRun.org for maps of Saturday's shuttles.

 

Presenters, Partners, and Friends

Many individuals, organizations, and friends of Women's Rights National Historical Park have come together to make Convention Days the outstanding day that is is. Thank you to all of our presenters, partners, and friends!

Coline has gathered key leaders of multiple organizations to discuss how they are celebrating 100 years of women’s votes!

Nancy Brown, The Elizabeth Cady Stanton Hometown Association
Victoria Brzustowicz, National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House
Melina Carnicelli, Women's March / 1st Amendment-1st Vote
Ana Dobrot, National History Day
Victoria Guerina, Sculptor of Suffragists and Suffragents
Judy Hart, 1st Superintendent, Women's Rights National Historical Park
Karen V. Hill, Women's Suffrage Centennial (Federal Commission)
Coline Jenkins, Elizabeth Cady Stanton Descendent, MonumentalWomen.org
Kathy Duffy Jens, Archives, Seneca Falls Historical Society
Pauline Copes Johnson, Harriet Tubman Descendent, Harriet Tubman Historical Society
Fredie Key, Women's Suffrage Celebration Coalition of Massachusetts
Sharon Leighton, NY State Canal Corps
Kate Macintyre,Women's Rights Alliance of New York State
Paula Miller, William G. Pomeroy Foundation
Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives
Nadia Shahram, Esq. The Declaration of Equalities for Muslim Women
Brian Stratton, NY State Canal Corps
Marilyn Tedeschi, Project Women 2020
Dare Thompson, League of Women Voters, NYS
Laurel Ullyette, Harriet Tubman Boosters
Sally Roesch Wagner, NYS Women's Suffrage Commission
Marsha Weinstein, National Votes for Women Trail
Judith Wellman, National Votes for Women Trail
Christopher Densmore, University Archivist at University of Buffalo, 1974-2001, Curator of Friends Historical Library at Swarthmore College, 2001-2017
Friends Historical Library is the repository of the archival records of New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore Yearly Meetings. Now Retired and working on a study of the Friends of Human Progress at Junius, NY. Editor, with Beverly Palmer, Nancy Hewitt and Carol Faulkner of "Lucretia Mott Speaks" (University of Illinois Press, 2018), Author of "Red Jacket, Iroquois Orator and Diplomat" (Syracuse, 1999); co editor and writer of "Quaker Cross Currents: Three Hundred Years of the New York," articles for Quaker History, The Canadian Quaker History Journal, New York History and other journals. Former Vice President and currently on the board of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society (founded in 1775), board of Friends Historical Association, Former president of Canadian Friends History Association, board of the Kennett Underground Railroad Center and frequent speaker to local groups on the Underground Railroad along the south eastern border of Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland.

Laura Densmore, Nature Photographer
Laura Densmore is a nature photographer, specializing in avian images. She turned her camera in another direction and was part of a project documenting historic structures in Chester County, Pennsylvania. The only buildings that retained their historic integrity were Quaker Meetinghouses. This led to an ongoing, self imposed project to document the interiors of many of the still used meetinghouses of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. Her images document the form and function of the buildings telling a tale of simplicity, integrity and the purpose of Quaker life.

Carol Faulkner, Professor of History and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University
Carol Faulkner is the author of "Lucretia Mott’s Heresy: Abolition and Women’s Rights in Nineteenth-Century America." She also co-edited (along with fellow speaker Chris Densmore) Lucretia Mott Speaks: The Essential Speeches and Sermons. Her new book, which will be published in September, is "Unfaithful: Love, Adultery, and Marriage Reform in Nineteenth-Century America."

Laura Free, Author & Historian
Laura Free got her B.A. from Grinnell College, her M.A. in Women’s History from Binghamton University, and her Ph.D. In American History from Cornell University. Her first book, "Suffrage Reconstructed: Gender, Race, and Voting Rights in the Civil War Era," examines why the word male was used to describe voters in the text of the Fourteenth Amendment, and why some woman suffrage activists responded with racism. She has taught American history at Hobart and William Smith Colleges since 2005. Laura is currently serving as a a board member at Humanities New York and is a delegate to the on the New York State Woman Suffrage Commission, led by Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul.

Walter Gable, Seneca County Historian
Walter Gable has been Seneca County Historian since August 2003. He earned his Bachelor's and Master's degrees at Syracuse University. He presents over 50 programs a year on various topics to school and community groups inside and outside of Seneca County.

Susan Goodier, Author & Professor, SUNY Oneonta
Susan Goodier studies U.S. women’s activism, particularly women’s suffrage activism, from 1840 to 1920. She earned a master’s degree in Gender History, a doctorate in Public Policy History, with subfields in International Gender and Culture and Black Women’s Studies, and a Women’s Studies Master’s degree, all from the University of Albany. At SUNY Oneonta she teaches various courses in Women’s History, New York State History, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and Progressivism. Dr. Goodier is the coordinator for the Upstate New York Women's History Organization (UNYWHO). She is a member of the board of directors for the New York History journal; in 2017 she edited a double issue on woman suffrage. The University of Illinois published her first book, "No Votes for Women: The New York State Anti-Suffrage Movement," in 2013. Her second book, coauthored with Karen Pastorello, is "Women Will Vote: Winning Suffrage in New York State" (Cornell University Press, 2017). She is currently working on two books: a biography of Louisa M. Jacobs, the daughter of Harriet Jacobs, author of "Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl," and another on black women in the New York suffrage movement.

Coline Jenkins, Elizabeth Cady Stanton Descendant, Vice President of Monumental Women Board of Directors
The great, great granddaughter of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Coline Jenkins is a legislator, author and television producer. Through the years, she has used her talents to inspire both awareness and pride in women's history. Coline is co-founder and president of the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Trust, a collection of 3,000 objects of women’s suffrage memorabilia that has been lent to museum exhibits, book publishers, documentary film producers, presidential libraries, popular magazines, television programs (both domestic and international) and Congressional testimony. The Trust’s lending practice fulfills its mission: To preserve the history of the women’s right movement, to educate the public on this history, and to promote the advancement of women’s rights. Ms. Jenkins is a resident of Greenwich, Connecticut, where for thirty years she has served as a municipal legislator. She co-authored a book, "33 Things Every Girl Should Know" about Women's History, and produced the television documentary, "An American Revolution: Women Take Their Place." Her 2009 testimony before the U.S. Senate contributed to the passage of federal legislation creating a national trail of historic sites, coordinated by Women’s Rights National Historical Park, known as The National Votes for Women Trail. Ms. Jenkins comes from a long line of women activists. In addition to her great, great grandmother Elizabeth Cady Stanton, her great grandmother Harriot Stanton Blatch, worked as a major organizer of New York State women suffrage during the Militant Period of 1913-1915. Jenkins’ mother was born one month prior to the passage of the 19th Amendment of the U. S. Constitution in 1920. Jenkins grew up in an atmosphere of suffrage and women’s right campaigning. She firmly believes equality is attainable.

Sally Roesch Wagner, Professor, Syracuse University
Awarded one of the first doctorates in the country for work in women’s studies (UC Santa Cruz) and a founder of one the first college-level women’s studies programs in the United States (CSU Sacramento), Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner has taught women’s studies courses for 50 years. She edited the intersectional "Women’s Suffrage Anthology" (Penguin Classics, 2019) and currently serves as an adjunct faculty member in The Renée Crown University Honors Program, Syracuse University and the St. John Fisher Executive Leadership Program

Judith Wellman, Historian
Judith Wellman was WRNHP’s first historian. Her book "Road to Seneca Falls: ECS and the First Woman’s Rights Convention," remains the definitive study of the 1848 Seneca Falls convention. She taught at the State University of NY at Oswego from 1972-2010 but left full-time teaching in 2000 to start a business called Historical New York Research Associates. She specializes in historic sites relating to women’s rights, the Underground Railroad, and African American life in New York State.


 

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Last updated: November 6, 2019

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Mailing Address:

136 Fall Street
Seneca Falls, NY 13148

Phone:

(315) 568-0024

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