Educator's Guide: Social Studies: Who's Who? Questions

WHO WAS WHO IN THE VICKSBURG CAMPAIGN?
Questions

AFTER EACH DESCRIPTION, IDENTIFY THE PERSON ASSOCIATED WITH THE VICKSBURG CAMPAIGN FROM THE LIST PROVIDED. THEN, CUT OUT THE PICTURES AND PASTE NEXT TO THE CORRECT DESCRIPTION

1. I was the 18th President of the United States. Before becoming president, I was the ranking general in the United States Army during the Civil War. My victory at Vicksburg in 1863 helped to prepare me for this position. I was a skilled equestrian and my favorite horse was named "Cincinnati." I was accused of drinking too much. I also liked to smoke pipes and cigars which may have resulted in the throat cancer that killed me in 1885.

Who am l? ______________________

2. I was the highest ranking regular army officer to resign and join the Confederacy. When Ulysses S. Grant was closing in on Vicksburg, I advised Confederate General John C. Pemberton to abandon the city to save his army. I was criticized for not attempting to relieve the besieged city, but I felt that my 30,000 men, who were ill-equipped and inexperienced, could do little to save Vicksburg. I died in 1891 after contracting cold while marching bareheaded in the funeral procession of one of my Civil War adversaries, William T. Sherman.

Who am l? ________________________

3. My nickname during the Civil War was "cump." I had red hair and a volatile temper; some reporters portrayed me as unstable and mentally deranged. I directed the XV Corps at Vicksburg and later "marched to the sea." Historians have credited me for inaugurating "total war" by destroying everything in my path. Many people wanted me to run for president in 1884 but I never cared for politics. I died in 1891 and was buried in St. Louis, Missouri.

Who am l? _______________________

4. I was the Second Admiral of the United States Navy. My father was a hero in the War of 1812 and my adopted brother was David G. Farragut. On April 16, 1863, I commanded the Mississippi River Fleet that successfully ran past Vicksburg batteries in conjunction with General Grant's land movements. I helped bring about the surrender of Vicksburg by bombarding the city from the Mississippi River.

Who am l? _________________________

5. In May of 1862, I was placed in command of the Confederate Ironclad ARKANSAS. I supervised the completion of the vessel and in July steamed down the Mississippi through David Farragut's Union fleet of 40 vessels anchored at Vicksburg. Aided by the element of surprise, the ARKANSAS caused serious damage to several ships. My beloved vessel had to be blown up when she experienced engine problems near Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Who am l? _________________________

6. I was the only Union Naval commander to have three vessels sunk under me during the Civil War. All three of these vessels started with the letter "C"; the CUMBERLAND, CAIRO, and CONESTOGA. The U.S.S. CAIRO became the first man-o-war in history to be sunk by a torpedo on December 12, 1862 in the Yazoo River north of Vicksburg. I also commanded the only land battery during the siege of Vicksburg that was manned entirely by sailors. I lived to be 88 years old.

Who am l? __________________________

7. In late 1862 I was placed in command of General John C. Pemberton's cavalry. My greatest achievement was the destruction of General Grant's supply depots at Holly Springs, Mississippi in December, 1862. This action disrupted Grant's projected operations against Vicksburg. I died, not at the hands of the enemy, but at those of a jealous husband. Upon moving my division into middle Tennessee, I was killed on May 7, 1863, by Dr. George B. Peters, who alleged that I had "violated the sanctity of his home. " I was buried in Port Gibson, Mississippi.

Who am l? __________________________

8. I was the 16th President of the United States. As a young man I traveled down the Mississippi River and worked as a stevedore. When the Civil War began, I realized the importance of controlling the "Mighty Mississippi." I once said, "Vicksburg is the key ... and the war can never be brought to a close until that key is in our pocket. " I became the first American president to be assassinated when John Wilkes Booth shot me while watching a performance of "Our American Cousin" at Ford's Theatre in Washington D.C.

Who am l? ___________________________

9. During the secession crisis, I was a lawyer and local politician in Mobile, Alabama. I was sent by the governor of Alabama to the state of my birth, North Carolina, to encourage its enlistment in the Confederacy. During the Vicksburg Campaign, I led my men against General Grant's forces at Port Gibson and at Champion Hill. In June, 1863 while firing a borrowed rifle at the enemy, I was shot and killed by a federal sharpshooter. I died before receiving the news that I had been promoted to Brigadier General.

Who am l? ___________________________

10. I was born in Kentucky less than 100 miles from the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln. I was pruning rosebushes on my plantation south of Vicksburg when I heard that I had been elected President of the Confederate States of America. After the war, I was charged with treason and imprisoned for two years at Fortress Monroe, Virginia. I was never brought to trial and released on bail. I never regained my citizenry and lived the rest of my life in Mississippi.

Who am l? _______________________

11. I was born in Wilmington, North Carolina and raised in Florida. I lost an arm in the battle of Chapultepec during the Mexican War. During the Vicksburg Campaign, I was cut off from Pemberton's forces at Champion Hill and blamed the general for the Confederate defeat there. I was called "Old Blizzards" because of my battle cry "Give them blizzards, boys)" After the Civil War I went abroad and entered the service of the Khedive of Egypt in 1869. I returned to the United States in 1879 and died seven years later in New York City.

Who am l? _____________________________

12. My name is one of 36,212 names listed inside the Illinois Memorial at Vicksburg National Military Park. I served for three years with the 95th Illinois Infantry during the Civil War. While in camp, I preferred to sit apart from my peers and liked to smoke a pipe in silence. After the war, I settled in Illinois and in 1911 was involved in an auto accident. When I was examined the physician discovered my secret ... that I was really a female! I was later confined in an insane asylum and forced to wear female attire. I received a military pension until my death in 1915.

Who am l? __________________________

13. I was born in Savannah, Georgia and later moved to St. Louis where I earned my living as an architect. I fought in all the battles preceding the siege of Vicksburg and was commended for my ability and gallant conduct. As a result, I was promoted to Major General. However, my health failed when I contracted dysentery during the siege and I died shortly after the surrender of Vicksburg near Raymond, Mississippi. Twenty-four years after my death, my remain were brought to Vicksburg and reinterred in the Confederate Cemetery.

Who am l? _______________________

14. I was a 14-year-old drummer boy serving with the 55th Illinois Infantry during the Vicksburg Campaign. During the May 19th assault on Stockade Redan I was shot in the leg while trying to obtain ammunition from a nearby regiment. General Sherman noticed that I was wounded and bleeding and told me to get to the rear at once. I was determined to get the ammunition but I followed his orders. In 1896 I was awarded the Medal of Honor for my bravery.

Who am l? ________________________

15. I was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and later moved to Illinois where I became a music teacher. I entered the Union army early in the war as a volunteer without pay. In the spring of 1863 1 led perhaps the greatest cavalry raid of the Civil War through the state of Mississippi. The purpose of my 800-mile ride was to divert attention from General Grant's planned crossing of the Mississippi River below Vicksburg. My famous raid was later the subject of a movie entitled "The Horse Soldiers."

Who am l? __________________________

16. Though I was born in Pennsylvania, I married a lady from Virginia and decided to join the Confederacy during the Civil War. I served with Ulysses S. Grant during the Mexican War and later opposed him as General of Confederate forces at Vicksburg. Because of my Northern birth, my loyalty to the Southern Cause was suspect. After the war I lived on a farm in Virginia. I died in 1881 and was buried in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Who am l? ___________________________

Last updated: April 14, 2015

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