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Write a Draft National Historic Landmark Nomination

NHL Nomination Form


Your NHL contact will provide you with an electronic nomination form. Please fill out the nomination form using a current version of Microsoft Word.

When completing the form please observe the following conventions:

  • Use your machine's default font (usually a Times New Roman 12 point). Do not change fonts or add any additional font codes in the document.
  • Enter the name of the property in both Header A and Header B, overwriting the text “Property Name.” Be sure to retain all the capital letters and use bold codes.
  • Use the typeover feature when filling in blanks.
  • Do not adjust margins within the document.
  • Use single-spaced typing.
  • Use footnotes for nominations of historic properties.
  • Use the Society for American Archaeology's style guide if you are nominating an archeological site.
  • Italicize, do not underline, titles and foreign words.
  • Do not scan photographs or other illustrations into the text of the document.
  • Do not reference images within the text.
  • If you are including a column format inventory for section 7, use parallel columns, not newspaper columns. Create columns only by using Microsoft Word's column feature.
  • Use letters, alphabetically, to reference the UTM points in section 10.

How to Fill Out the Nomination Form

Section 1: Name of Property

Historic Name


Select the historic name reflecting the property's national significance. For example:

  • Bethune, Mary McLeod, Home
  • Princeton Battlefield
  • Virginia City Historic District

Other Names/Site Number


Enter any other names by which the property has been commonly known. These names may reflect the property's history, current ownership, or popular use and may or may not reflect the historic name. Site numbers are often assigned to archeological sites for identification. This number may be placed on this line.

Section 2: Location


Enter the street address of the property or the most specific location when no street number exists.

Mark an "x" in the boxes for both "not for publication" and "vicinity" (and add the name of the nearest city or town in the provided blank) to indicate that a property needs certain protection. The NPS shall withhold from disclosure to the public information about the location, character, or ownership of a historic resource if the Secretary of the Interior and the NPS determine that disclosure may

  1. cause a significant invasion of privacy,
  2. risk harm to the historic resource, or
  3. impede the use of a traditional religious site by practitioners.

The Federal Register will indicate "Address Restricted" and give the nearest city or town as the property's location. The NHL database will also refer to the location this way. Further, the NPS will exclude location and other appropriate information from any copies of documentation requested by the public.

Any information about the location, boundaries, or character of a property that should be restricted should be compiled on a separate sheet. On the same sheet, explain the reasons for restricting the information.

When it has been determined that this information should be withheld from the public, the Secretary, in consultation with the official recommending the restriction of information, shall determine who may have access to the information for the purpose of carrying out the National Historic Preservation Act.

Section 3: Classification

Ownership of Property


Mark an "x" in all boxes that apply to indicate ownership of the property.

Category of Property


Mark an "x" in only one box to indicate the type of property being documented. Please read the section below titled National Register Property and Resources Types for explanations and examples of these categories.

Name of Multiple Property Listing


Enter the name of the multiple property listing if the property is being nominated as part of a multiple property submission.

Number of Resources Within Property


Enter the number of resources in each category that make up the property. Count contributing resources separately from noncontributing resources. Total each column. Please see the section below titled Rules for Counting Resources for more detail.

A contributing building, site, structure, or object adds to the historical associations, historic architectural qualities, or archeological values for which a property is nationally significant because it was present during the period of significance, relates to the documented significance of the property, and possesses a high degree of historical integrity.

A noncontributing building, site, structure, or object was not present during the period of national significance, does not relate to the documented national significance of the property, or due to alterations, disturbances, additions, or other changes, it no longer possesses a high degree of historical integrity. If resources of state or local significance are included and their significance is justified in the documentation, they should be counted separately from those that contribute to the national significance.

Number of Contributing Resources Previously Listed in the National Register


Enter the number of any contributing resources already listed in the National Register. This would include both previously designated NHLs and authorized historic units of the National Park System as well as other previously listed National Register properties. If no resources are already listed, enter "N/A."

National Register Property and Resource Types

  • Building - A building, such as a house, barn, church, hotel, or similar construction, is created principally to shelter any form of human activity. "Building" may also be used to refer to a historically and functionally related unit, such as a courthouse and jail or a house and barn.
Examples: houses, barns, stables, sheds, garages, courthouses, city halls, social halls, commercial buildings, libraries, factories, mills, train depots, stationary mobile homes, hotels, theaters, schools, stores, and churches.

  • Site - A site is the location of a significant event, a prehistoric or historic occupation or activity, or a building or structure, whether standing, ruined, or vanished, where the location itself possesses historic, cultural, or archeological value regardless of the value of any existing structure.
Examples: habitation sites, funerary sites, rock shelters, village sites, hunting and fishing sites, ceremonial sites, petroglyphs, rock carvings, gardens, grounds, battlefields, ruins of historic buildings and structures, campsites, sites of treaty signings, trails, areas of land, shipwrecks, cemeteries, designed landscapes, and natural features, such as springs and rock formations, and land areas having cultural significance.

  • Structure - The term "structure" is used to distinguish from buildings those functional constructions made usually for purposes other than creating human shelter.
Examples: bridges, tunnels, gold dredges, firetowers, canals, turbines, dams, power plants, corncribs, silos, roadways, shot towers, windmills, grain elevators, kilns, mounds, cairns, palisade fortifications, earthworks, railroad grades, systems of roadways and paths, boats and ships, railroad locomotives and cars, telescopes, carousels, bandstands, gazebos, and aircraft.

  • Object - The term "object" is used to distinguish from buildings and structures those constructions that are primarily artistic in nature or are relatively small in scale and simply constructed. Although it may be, by nature or design, movable, an object is associated with a specific setting or environment.
Examples: sculpture, monuments, boundary markers, statuary, and fountains.

  • District - A district possesses a significant concentration, linkage, or continuity of sites, buildings, structures, or objects united historically or aesthetically by plan or physical development.
Examples: college campuses; central business districts; residential areas; commercial areas; large forts; industrial complexes; civic centers; rural villages; canal systems; collections of habitation and limited activity sites; irrigation systems; large farms, ranches, estates, or plantations; transportation networks; and large landscaped parks.

Rules for Counting Resources

  • Count all buildings, structures, sites, and objects located within the property's boundaries that are substantial in size and scale. Do not count minor resources, such as small sheds or grave markers, unless they strongly contribute to the property's historic significance.
  • Count a building or structure with attached ancillary structures, covered walkways, and additions as a single unit unless the attachment was originally constructed as a separate building or structure and later connected.
  • Count rowhouses individually, even though attached.
  • Do not count interiors, facades, or artwork separately from the building or structure of which they are a part.
  • Count gardens, parks, vacant lots, or open spaces as "sites" only if they contribute to the significance of the property.
  • Count a continuous site as a single unit regardless of its size or complexity.
  • Count separate areas of a discontiguous archeological district as separate sites.
  • Do not count ruins separately from the site of which they are a part.
  • Do not count landscape features, such as fences and paths, separately from the site of which they are a part unless they are particularly important or large in size and scale, such as a statue by a well-known sculptor or an extensive system of irrigation ditches.
  • If a group of resources, such as backyard sheds in a residential district, was not identified during a site inspection and cannot be included in the count, state that this is the case and explain why in the narrative for Section 7.
  • For additional guidance, contact your State Historic Preservation Officer.

Section 4: State/Federal Agency Certification


Preparers should leave this section blank.

Section 5: National Park Service Certification


Preparers should leave this section blank.

Section 6: Function or Use

Historic Function


Select one or more category and subcategory that most accurately describe the property's principal historic functions. Enter functions for contributing resources only and for extant resources only. Select functions that relate directly to the property's significance and occurred during the period of national significance. Enter only functions that can be verified by research, testing, or examination of physical evidence.

Please see below for Guidelines for Entering Functions and Data Categories for Functions and Uses.

Current Function


Select one or more category and subcategory that most accurately describe the property's most recent principal functions. Enter functions for both contributing and noncontributing resources.

Guidelines for Entering Functions


General

  • Enter the most specific category and subcategory. For example, "Education/education-related housing" rather than "Domestic/institutional housing" for a college dormitory.
  • If no subcategory applies, enter the general category by itself. If, in addition, none of the general categories relates to the property's function, enter "Other:" and an appropriate term for the function.
  • For properties with many functions, such as a farm, list only the principal or predominant ones, placing the most important first.
  • For districts, enter the functions applying to the district as a whole, such as Domestic/village site or Education/college.
  • For districts, also enter the functions of buildings, sites, structures, and objects that are:
    1. of outstanding importance to the district, such as a county courthouse in a commercial center (Government/county courthouse) or,
    2. present in substantial numbers, such as apartment buildings in a residential district (Domestic/multiple dwelling) or storage pits in a village site (Trade/trade).
  • For districts containing resources having different functions and relatively equal importance, such as a group of public buildings whose functions are Government/city hall, Government/courthouse, and Government/post office.


Historic Functions

  • Enter functions for contributing resources only.
  • Select functions that relate directly to the property's significance and occurred during the period of significance (see Period of Significance).
  • Enter functions for extant resources only.
  • Enter only functions that can be verified by research, testing, or examination of physical evidence.
  • Enter functions related to the property itself, not to the occupation of associated persons or role of associated events. For example, the home of a prominent doctor is "Domestic/single dwelling" not "Health Care/medical office" unless the office was at home (in which case, list both functions).


Current Functions

  • Enter functions for both contributing and noncontributing resources.
  • For properties undergoing rehabilitation, restoration, or adaptive reuse, enter "Work in Progress" in addition to any functions that are current or anticipated upon completion of the work.

Data Categories for Functions and Uses:

Category: Domestic

  • Subcategory:
    1. single dwelling
      • Examples: single dwelling rowhouse, mansion, residence, rockshelter, homestead, cave
    2. multiple dwelling
      • Examples: duplex, apartment building, pueblo, rockshelter, cave
    3. secondary structure
      • Examples: dairy, smokehouse, storage pit, storage shed, kitchen, garage, other dependencies
    4. hotel
      • Examples: inn, hotel, motel, way station
    5. institutional housing
      • Examples: military quarters, staff housing, poor house, orphanage
    6. camp
      • Examples: hunting campsite, fishing camp, summer camp, forestry camp, seasonal residence, temporary habitation site, tipi rings
    7. village site
      • Examples: pueblo group

Category: Commerce/Trade

  • Subcategory:
    1. business
      • Examples: office building
    2. professional
      • Examples: architect's studio, engineering office, law office
    3. organizational
      • Examples: trade union, labor union, professional association
    4. financial institution
      • Examples: savings and loan association, bank, stock exchange
    5. specialty store
      • Examples: auto showroom, bakery, clothing store, blacksmith shop, hardware store
    6. department store
      • Examples: general store, department store, marketplace, trading post
    7. restaurant
      • Examples: cafe, bar, roadhouse, tavern
    8. warehouse
      • Examples: warehouse, commercial storage
    9. trade (archeology)
      • Examples: cache, site with evidence of trade, storage pit

Category: Social

  • Subcategory:
    1. meeting hall
      • Examples: grange; union hall; Pioneer hall; hall of other fraternal, patriotic, or political organization
    2. clubhouse
      • Examples: facility of literary, social, or garden club
    3. civic
      • Examples: facility of volunteer or public service organizations such as the American Red Cross

Category: Government

  • Subcategory:
    1. capitol
      • Examples: statehouse, assembly building
    2. city hall
      • Examples: city hall, town hall
    3. correctional facility
      • Examples: police station, jail, prison
    4. fire station
      • Examples: firehouse
    5. govenment office
      • Examples: municipal building
    6. diplomatic building
      • Examples: embassy, consulate
    7. custom house
      • Examples: custom house
    8. post office
      • Examples: post office
    9. public works
      • Examples: electric generating plant, sewer system
    10. courthouse
      • Examples: county courthouse, federal courthouse

Category: Education

  • Subcategory:
    1. school
      • Examples: schoolhouse, academy, secondary school, grammar school, trade or technical school
    2. college
      • Examples: university, college, junior college
    3. library
      • Examples: library
    4. research facility
      • Examples: laboratory, observatory, planetarium
    5. education-related
      • Examples: college dormitory, housing at boarding schools

Category: Religion

  • Subcategory:
    1. religious facility
      • Examples: church, temple, synagogue, cathedral, mission, temple, mound, sweathouse, kiva, dance court, shrine
    2. ceremonial site
      • Examples: astronomical observation post, intaglio, petroglyph site
    3. church school
      • Examples: religious academy or schools
    4. church-related residence
      • Examples: parsonage, convent, rectory

Category: Funerary

  • Subcategory:
    1. cemetery
      • Examples: burying ground, burial site, cemetery, ossuary
    2. graves/burials
      • Examples: burial cache, burial mound, grave area, crematorium
    3. mortuary
      • Examples: mortuary site, funeral home, cremation

Category: Recreation and Culture

  • Subcategory:
    1. theater
      • Examples: cinema, movie theater, playhouse
    2. auditorium
      • Examples: hall, auditorium
    3. museum
      • Examples: museum, art gallery, exhibition hall
    4. music facility
      • Examples: concert-hall, opera house, bandstand, dance hall
    5. sports facility
      • Examples: gymnasium, swimming pool, tennis court, playing field, stadium
    6. outdoor recreation
      • Examples: park, campground, picnic area, hiking trail,fair, amusement park, county fairground
    7. monument/marker
      • Examples: commemorative marker, commemorative monument
    8. work of art
      • Examples: sculpture, carving, statue, mural, rock art

Category: Agriculture/Subsistence

  • Subcategory:
    1. processing
      • Examples: meatpacking plant, cannery, smokehouse, brewery, winery, food processing site, gathering site, tobacco barn
    2. storage
      • Examples: granary, silo, wine cellar, storage site, tobacco warehouse, cotton warehouse
    3. agricultural
      • Examples: pasture, vineyard, orchard, wheatfield, crop field marks, stone alignments, terrace, hedgerow
    4. animal facility
      • Examples: hunting & kill site, stockyard, barn, chicken coop, hunting corral, hunting run, apiary
    5. fish hatchery
      • Examples: fish hatchery, fishing grounds
    6. horticultural facility
      • Examples: greenhouse, plant observatory, garden
    7. agricultural outbuilding
      • Examples: wellhouse, wagon shed, tool shed, barn
    8. irrigation facility
      • Examples: irrigation system, canals, stone alignments, headgates, check dams

Category: Industry/Processing/Extraction

  • Subcategory:
    1. manufacturing facility
      • Examples: mill, factory, refinery, processing plant, pottery, kiln
    2. extractive facility
      • Examples: coal mine, oil derrick, gold dredge, quarry, salt mine
    3. waterworks
      • Examples: reservoir, water tower, canal, dam
    4. energy facility
      • Examples: windmill, power plant, hydroelectric dam
    5. communcations facility
      • Examples: telegraph cable station, printing plant, television station, telephone company facility, satellite tracking station
    6. processing site
      • Examples: shell processing site, toolmaking site, copper mining and processing site
    7. industrial site
      • Examples: warehouse

Category: Health Care

  • Subcategory:
    1. hospital
      • Examples: veteran's medical center, mental hospital, private or public hospital, medical research facility
    2. clinic
      • Examples: dispensary, doctor's office
    3. sanitarium
      • Examples: nursing home, rest home, sanitarium
    4. medical business/office
      • Examples: pharmacy, medical supply store, doctor or dentist's office
    5. resort
      • baths, spas, resort facility

Category: Defense

  • Subcategory:
    1. arms storage
      • Examples: magazine, armory
    2. fortification
      • Examples: fortified military or naval post, earth fortified village, palisaded village, fortified knoll or mountain top, battery, bunker
    3. military facility
      • Examples: military post, supply depot, garrison fort, barrack, military camp
    4. battle site
      • Examples: battlefield
    5. coast guard facility
      • Examples: lighthouse, coast guard station, pier, dock, lifesaving station
    6. naval facility
      • Examples: submarine, aircraft carrier, battleship, naval base
    7. air facility
      • Examples: aircraft, air base, missile launching site

Category: Landscape

  • Subcategory:
    1. parking lot
    2. park
      • Examples: city park, state park, national park
    3. plaza
      • Examples: square, green, plaza, public common
    4. garden
    5. forest
    6. unoccupied land
      • Examples: meadow, swamp, desert
    7. underwater
      • Examples: underwater site
    8. natural feature
      • Examples: mountain, valley, promontory, tree, river, island, pond, lake
    9. street furniture/object
      • Examples: street light, fence, wall, shelter, gazebo, park bench
    10. conservation area
      • Examples: wildlife refuge, ecological habitat

Category: Transportation

  • Subcategory:
    1. rail-related
      • Examples: railroad, train depot, locomotive, streetcar line, railroad bridge
    2. air-related
      • Examples: aircraft, airplane hangar, airport, launching site
    3. water-related
      • Examples: lighthouse, navigational aid, canal, boat, ship, wharf, shipwreck
    4. road-related (vehicular)
      • Examples: parkway, highway, bridge, toll gate, parking garage
    5. pedestrian-related
      • Examples: boardwalk, walkway, trail

Category: Work in Progress

  • Use this category when work is in progress.

Section 7: Description

Section 7 requires a contemporary and historic description of the property and its physical characteristics; this section demonstrates the high level of historic integrity which the property must possess.

Outlining Section 7:

  • Begin with a summary paragraph that briefly describes the general characteristics of the property, such as its location and setting, type, style, method of construction, size, and significant features. The summary paragraph should be an overview of the current condition of the property and its site. Subsequent paragraphs will provide the details.
  • Describe the setting, buildings, and other major resources, outbuildings, surface and subsurface remains (for properties with archeological national significance), and landscape features for all contributing and noncontributing resources. List and number all of the buildings, sites, structures, and objects which are within the proposed NHL. Make sure that the numbering you use corresponds to the numbering on the map and/or site plan.
  • Document the evolution of the property over time, describing major changes since its construction or its period of national significance.


Good quality photographs, and site and floor plans provide much of the documentation necessary to convey the appearance of a property. However, there are many features which are not evident in photographs. For example, the materials used in construction should be described and this description should be tied to the issue of integrity. This verbal description of the materials used contributes to a better understanding of how a building, structure, or landscape evolved. Even if you are not nominating the property for its architecture, Section 7 should describe the property in terms of its architecture.

Integrity involves the retention of historic fabric. A property with strong integrity will have a very minimal amount of alterations. Use Section 7 to clarify how and why your property retains its integrity.

Descriptions should concentrate on important features not evident in the photographs, especially as they relate to how a building functioned. This is particularly true of buildings with extended wings, such as farmhouses, or connected storage buildings and boiler houses with factories.

The identification of principal rooms helps explain how a building functioned. The functions of various spaces are especially important with industrial architecture since the operation of a mill cannot be understood without explaining its internal arrangements. The same applies for schools, libraries, or other institutional buildings.

The importance of understanding how a building functioned is relevant for Criteria 1 and 2, as well as 4. By describing the function of a property (house and grounds) you will be less likely to omit important features in your descriptions.

It is always a good idea to thoroughly research a property to determine the full extent of a property's significance. This should include research into whether or not a property has been investigated archeologically or if it has archeological potential.

If you find that a property has had archeological investigations or has archeological potential, it may or may not contribute to the national significance of the property. However, the nomination should include a brief discussion of the archeology of the site if archeology has been done or if it may be done there. The extent to which you discuss archeology in a nomination will depend on the level of significance of the archeological resources and in what ways the resources contribute to the significance of the property.

If you are unsure about how archeology might contribute you should:

  • Discuss the archeology of the property with a qualified, professional archeologist. If the archeology dates to the precontact period, talk with a prehistorian (an archeologist who studies the precontact period). If the archeology dates to the historic period, talk with a historical archeologist (an archeologist who studies the historic period).
  • You should note in the nomination, where applicable, that archeological excavations have been done.


Section 7 for Archeological Properties:

Section 7 is a narrative, physical description of the property as it exists today and as it was in the past (during the period of significance). This includes a description of the property's past and current environmental setting and physical condition.


Outlining Section 7:

  • Begin with a summary paragraph that briefly describes the general characteristics of the property, such as its location, setting, type, period of significance, cultural group(s) associated with the property, range of the contributing resources, and integrity of the property and its setting. Please note that the period of significance and cultural group will be discussed more fully in Section 8, but for the purposes of this summary, these subjects should be discussed to the level needed to provide the reader with a basic orientation regarding the property.
  • Describe the present and, if different, the relevant past environmental setting that prevailed during the property's period(s) of occupation or use, or period of significance (which may relate to the time when the archeological research was done at the property). This description should focus on the environmental features or factors that are or were relevant to the location, use, formation, or preservation of the archeological property.
  • Describe the physical characteristics of the property including: type site, important structures or ruins, density of features, artifacts, ecofacts, the extent of the deposits, and integrity including any natural and cultural process that have disturbed the site.
  • Describe previous investigations: Who did them? When? Why? Where? What did they find and where are the collections currently housed?

Section 8: Statement of Significance


The following information must be provided in order to demonstrate how a property possesses exceptional significance in illustrating or interpreting a broad national story and to make a compelling justification for NHL designation.

Outlining Section 8:

  • Begin with a summary statement to introduce the significance section. This should include a discussion of the relevant NHL criterion/criteria and related NHL themes. Provide an overview of the property's national significance. This should be done in a few paragraphs.
  • Discuss the broad national story associated with this property. NHL theme studies may be useful to you in establishing this historic context.
  • Provide the historical background of the property and place the property's history and/or archeology within the context of the national story.
  • Using specific examples, discuss how and why your property possesses national significance.
  • Establish the relative merit of the significance and historic integrity of the property in comparison to other similar properties.
  • Write a concluding paragraph.
  • Your argument must be supported with footnoted citations, unless you are using the Society for American Archaeology's citation method for archeological properties.

Please note: when writing Section 8, please refrain from using block quotations unless absolutely necessary; large block quotations typically do not advance an argument as to why the property is eligible for NHL designation.

Section 8 for Archeological Properties:


The following information should be provided in order to demonstrate how a property illustrates nationally significant information and to make a compelling argument for NHL designation for your archeological property.

Outlining Section 8:

  • Begin with a summary introductory statement. Include a discussion of the NHL criteria and related NHL themes. Provide an overview of the national significance of the property. This should be done in a few paragraphs.
  • Discuss the national historic and archeological context of the property. The context will include a body of thematically, geographically, and temporally linked information; this is the analytical framework within which the property's importance can be understood and to which archeological investigations are likely to contribute important information.
  • Directly relate your property to NHL Criterion 6. Provide information about the research agenda, demonstrating how this research agenda discusses nationally significant information. Include a discussion of the archeological literature that shows how this property provides a major contribution to the field.
  • Discuss the related NHL theme and compare your property to other properties of this type or similar properties to establish how your property provides nationally significant information.
  • Write a concluding paragraph.

NHL Exceptions 1-8


Properties which fall into the following categories require special consideration in order to be designated as NHLs. If a property is eligible for an exception, it generally has to meet higher standards in its other criteria for designation. If your property fits into any of these categories, please check with your NHL reviewer to see if it may still be eligible for NHL designation. The examples below are NHLs which were designated with an exception in each one of these categories:

  • Exception 1: Properties owned by religious institutions or used for religious purposes either historically or currently.
    Example: Church of the Holy Ascension, Unalaska, AK
  • Exception 2: Buildings or structures that have been moved from their original historic location.
    Example: Block Island South East Light, Block Island, RI
  • Exception 3: Site of a building or structure no longer standing.
    Example: W.E.B. Du Bois Boyhood Homesite, Great Barrington, MA
  • Exception 4: Birthplaces and graves of historical figures.
    Example: William McKinley Tomb, Canton, OH
  • Exception 5: Cemeteries.
    Example: Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, NY
  • Exception 6: Reconstructed buildings or grouping of buildings.
    Example: Williamsburg Historic District, Williamsburg, VA
  • Exception 7: Properties that are primarily commemorative in nature.
    Example: Haymarket Martyrs' Monument, Chicago, IL
  • Exception 8: Properties that have achieved national significance within the past 50 years.
    Example: The Forty Acres, Delano, CA

Citation Method: Footnotes


For properties nominated under Criteria 1-5, use The Chicago Manual of Style published by the University of Chicago Press (see examples below). The Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide is a helpful online reference tool. For properties nominated under Criterion 6, use the Society for American Archaeology's style guide.

Include only information pertinent to the property and its eligibility.

Examples of how to properly cite sources in your footnotes using The Chicago Manual of Style:

Book:


One author:
N(ote): 1. Beth Savage, ed., African American Historic Places (Washington, DC: Preservation Press, 1994), 69.
Chapter or other part of a book:
N: 5. Andrew Wiese, “‘The House I Live In': Race, Class, and African American Suburban Dreams in the Postwar United States,” in The New Suburban History, ed. Kevin M. Kruse and Thomas J. Sugrue (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006), 101–102.

Oral History Interview:


N: 8. Benjamin Spock, interview by Milton J. Sean, November 20, 1974, interview 67A, transcript, Senn Oral History Collection, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD.

National Register of Historic Places or National Historic Landmark Nomination Form:


N: 3. Susan L. Flader, “Aldo Leopold Shack,” National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, 1978), Section 8.

HABS-HAER Report:


N: 16. Sarah Eaton, “Pan American Airways System Terminal Building, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL,” Historic American Buildings Survey Report [HABS No. FL-36] (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, 1981), 2.

Historic Structures Report:


N: Cultural Resources Division, Southeast Regional Office, “Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Bodie Island Lighthouse and Oil House Historic Structure Report” (Atlanta: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, December 2004).

Examples of how to properly format in-text citations using the Society for American Archaeology guidelines:

Simple citation:


(Wylie 1991) or Wylie (1991)

Primary-source materials (e.g., unpublished archival materials including administrative records, letters, etc.):


(Archivo General de la Nación, Lima [AGN], Juzgado de Aguas 3.3.7.23, f. 3v); note that subsequent citations would use only the acronym AGN and the shortened "Aguas" (e.g., AGN, Aguas 3.3.4.39, 3.3.9.9)

Newspapers:


(Weekly Missouri Courier [WMC], 7 July 1838: page numbers [if available])

Citation Method: Bibliography


Enter the primary and secondary sources used in documenting and evaluating the national significance of the property. These include books, journal or magazine articles, newspaper articles, interviews, planning documents, historic resource studies or survey reports, prepared NHL Theme Studies, census data, correspondence, deeds, wills, business records, diaries, and other sources.

For properties nominated under Criteria 1-5, use The Chicago Manual of Style published by the University of Chicago Press (see examples below). The Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide is a helpful online reference tool. For properties nominated under Criterion 6, use the Society for American Archaeology's style guide.

Examples of how to properly cite sources in a bibliography using The Chicago Manual of Style:

Book:


One author
Savage, Beth, ed. African American Historic Places. Washington, DC: Preservation Press, 1994.

Chapter or other part of a book
Wiese, Andrew. “‘The House I Live In': Race, Class, and African American Suburban Dreams in the Postwar United States.” In The New Suburban History, edited by Kevin M. Kruse and Thomas J. Sugrue, 11-32. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.

Oral History:

Spock, Benjamin. Interview by Milton J. Sean. November 20, 1974, interview 67A, transcript, Senn Oral History Collection, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD.

National Register of Historic Places or National Historic Landmark Nomination Form:

Flader, Susan L. “Aldo Leopold Shack,” National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, 1978.

HABS-HAER Report:

Eaton, Sarah. “Pan American Airways System Terminal Building, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL,” Historic American Buildings Survey Report (HABS No. FL-36). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, 1981.

Historic Structures Report:

Cultural Resources Division, Southeast Regional Office. “Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Bodie Island Lighthouse and Oil House Historic Structure Report.” Atlanta: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, December 2004.

Examples of how to properly cite sources in References Cited using American Antiquity:

Book, single author:

Elster, Jon
1989 Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press, New York.

Titled volume/monograph in a series:

Thomas, David H.
1983 The Archaeology of Monitor Valley: 2. Gatecliff Shelter. Anthropological Papers Vol. 59, Pt. 1. American Museum of Natural History, New York.

Article in a journal:

Ashmore, Wendy
1991 Site-Planning Principles and Concepts of Directionality Among the Ancient Maya. Latin American Antiquity 2:199–226.

Item in a newspaper:

Noble, John W.
2002 When Humans Became Human. New York Times 26 February:D1, D5. New York.

Maps, Site Plans, and Photographs


Please do not embed maps, site plans, or photographs in the text of the nomination.

If you have chosen to submit paper maps and site plans:

  • Review the guidelines for what kind of paper map(s) you need.
  • The original USGS map should be folded to fit into a folder approximately 8½x11 inches.
  • An 8½x11" copy of the map(s) may also be submitted as an image file via email or on a USB drive.
  • All other maps (sketch map(s), site plans, etc.) should be folded to fit into a folder approximately 8½x11 inches. If the original map(s) is larger than 8½x11 inches, a copy must also be submitted that has been reduced to this size. This photocopy will be used as reproduction of the map for review by the parties of notification and the various NPS review bodies.

If you have chosen to submit electronic maps and site plans:

Submit your color photographs via email or on a USB drive. Black and white images must be submitted on paper that meets our archival standards. See the National Register's photo policy for further guidance.

Once your images are submitted, your NHL staff contact will select several representative black and white images to include with the nomination package provided to the review boards.

Last updated: August 29, 2018