Eagle Historic District National Historic Landmark

Eagle City Hall, a log cabin with a white door, an American flag post, and surrounded by trees.

NPS Photo

Quick Facts

Location:
Eagle, Alaska
Significance:
Eagle was the military, judicial, transportation, and communications hub for interior Alaska at the turn of the 20th century.
Designation:
National Historic Landmark designated June 2, 1978
OPEN TO PUBLIC:
Yes



A 19th Century City in Alaska

Preserved much as it was in 1899, the small isolated community of Eagle offers visitors a rare glimpse into Alaska’s past. In its heyday, the City of Eagle served as judicial and transportation hub for interior Alaska, and adjacent Fort Egbert as the military and communications center. Eagle began as a fur trading post around 1880. When gold was discovered at nearby American Creek, a small mining camp was established at Eagle. The rush of gold seekers to Canada’s Klondike in brought national attention to Eagle. The prime site along the Yukon River a few miles from the Canadian border was an ideal location for the development of the City of Eagle. Fort Egbert was established as a control station and headquarters for interior Alaska in 1899 adjacent to Eagle.

Today, the Bureau of Land Management and Eagle Historical Society and Museums manage several of the historic buildings of Eagle. In addition, many of the historic homes are privately owned. A joint BLM/NPS field office is located in Eagle and can provide the visitor with more information on Eagle as well as nearby Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve.


Additional Information

Visit Fort Egbert in Eagle, Alaska

Eagle - Fort Egbert: A Remnant of the Past, BLM

Eagle Historical Society

Yukon Charley Rivers National Preserve - Learn about Eagle's history

Alaska Goldrush NHLs: The Stampede North

National Register of Historic Places - Official Nomination Form

More National Historic Landmarks in Alaska