Guest Speakers

In Their Footsteps Lecture Series

On the third Sunday, September through May at 1 p.m., this speaker series is an opportunity to meet scholars, authors, and artists. Join the conversation and be inspired by history, people and culture. This forum is sponsored by the Lewis & Clark National Park Association and presented in the Netul River Room of Fort Clatsop's visitor center, and is free of charge.

 
A rainy shoreline with the words Dismal Nitch across the bottom.

Nov. 17, 2019 -Trials and Tribulations of the Corps of Discovery

By: Ian Sampson

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, Fort Clatsop is pleased to announce the next In Their Footsteps free speaker series event. Trials and Tribulations of the Corps of Discovery by Ian Sampson will be on Sunday, November 17, at 1:00 p.m.

Ian Sampson is a self-educated historian with a personal fascination in the story of the Corps of Discovery under the leadership of Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Ian emigrated from Australia in 1980, studied at the University of Idaho, and upon graduation has worked as an historian on small cruise ships for more than twenty years. Ian loves to share the stories of historical events and show significance, meaning and relevance to both the actual event and the characters involved.

Lewis and Clark, and the men that volunteered and were accepted, were all aware of, and anticipated many “dangers, difficulties and fatigues” during this journey. Ian will regale you with stories of their courage and the trials and tribulations all of them had to overcome in order for them to survive and successfully complete the journey.

In Their Footsteps is a monthly Sunday forum sponsored by the Lewis & Clark National Park Association and the park. These programs are held in the Netul River Room of Fort Clatsop’s visitor center and are free of charge.

For more information, call the park at (503) 861-2471.

Other upcoming In Their Footsteps speaker series programs include:


- December 15 - Historic Winter Transportation by Richard Brenne

- January 19 - What Did Lewis & Clark Eat? by Jennifer Burns Bright
- February 16 - TBA by Barbara Linnett
- March 15 -
Ever Wild: A Lifetime on Mount Adams by Darryl Lloyd
- April 19 -
TBA by TBA
- May 17 -
Early Explorers of the Pacific Northwest -
A Long Time Coming by Robert Heacock

 

Nature Matters: Where Nature and Culture Meet

A lively monthly conversation about the intersection of nature and culture, takes place on the second Thursdays of the month at 7:00pm, August through May, at the Fort George Brewery + Public House in Astoria, Oregon. Doors open at 6 p.m. to purchase dinner or beverages at the George before the event. The series delves into the many ways that human beings look to the natural world for inspiration, sustenance and survival - the intersection of nature and culture. The collaborative series is hosted by Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, Lewis & Clark National Park Association and the North Coast Watershed Association in partnership with the Fort George Brewery + Public House and is free to the public.

 
Dr. Carmichael holding a tube filled with water and algae behind large glass jars filled with water and algae.

Nov. 14, 2019-How harmful are Harmful Algae Blooms?

By: Dr. Wayne Carmichael

At the next Nature Matters, Dr. Wayne Carmichael will discuss the need to balance human activities with our need to manage nutrients in aquatic systems, mitigate harmful algal blooms and reduce health risk; all in the context of a changing climate.

The 7 p.m. presentation takes place November 14 at the Fort George Lovell Showroom, 1483 Duane Street, Astoria. This free event is open to the public. Doors open at 6 p.m. to purchase dinner or beverages at the Fort George Brewery before the event.

Cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, are ancient microbes responsible for aerobic photosynthesis and production of the earth’s oxygen. They are also very adaptive, ranging from thermal hot springs to high altitude rocky terrain, and more important for this talk, responding all too well to human development and nutrient enrichment of our water supplies—including reservoirs, lakes, ponds, rivers and streams. Due to improper and over-development of water resources, especially nutrient enrichment from municipal, industrial and agricultural sources, cyanobacteria proliferate or “bloom”, forming dense growths in our local waters. These blooms disturb food chains, contaminate water treatment systems, and produce potent toxins that sicken and kill wild and domestic animals and humans.

Dr. Wayne Carmichael is a retired (2007) Professor of Biological Sciences and Professor Emeritus at Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio. An Oregon native, he received his B.Sc. in Botany/Zoology from Oregon State University in 1969. He earned a M.Sc. in 1972 and a Ph.D. in 1974 from the University of Alberta, Edmonton in the areas of limnology, aquatic microbiology and pharmacology. His professional career was spent on primary research of cyanobacteria freshwater harmful algae blooms (HABs). Projects as a Professor Emeritus focus on management and mitigation of harmful cyanobacteria in municipal and recreational water supplies. This includes serving on national and international HAB committees, organization of and participation in workshops and symposia plus advising on HAB issues for local, state, national and international agencies and groups. He is a Board member of the Oregon Lakes Association, Clatsop County Soil and Water Conservation District and the Elsie-Vinemaple Rural Fire and Rescue District. He makes his home in the coast range, on the beautiful Nehalem River.

Nature Matters, a lively conversation about the intersection of nature and culture, takes place on the second Thursday of each month from October through May. Nature Matters is hosted by Lewis and Clark National Historical Park in partnership with the North Coast Watershed Association, the Lewis & Clark National Park Association, and the Fort George Brewery + Public House.

For more information, call the park at (503) 861-2471.

Upcoming Nature Matters Programs:
December 12, 2019 - Marine Debris and Microplastics in Youngs Bay -Dorothy Horn
January 9, 2020 - Chum Salmon - Kris Homel, ODFW
Feburary 13, 2020 - No Nature Matters Program
March 12, 2020 - Orcas - Colleen Weiler
April 9, 2020 -Soundscapes of the Ocean - Samara Haver, NOAA
May 14, 2020 - Traditional Ecological Knowledge - Lisa Redsteer, Northwest Indian College

Last updated: October 31, 2019

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park
92343 Fort Clatsop Road

Astoria, OR 97103

Phone:

(503) 861-2471

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