Avian Mystery

Girl measures her wingspan against that of a life-size bald eagle puzzle
Student measures her wingspan against that of the life-size mystery bird puzzle

NPS Photo

Avian Mystery online request form

Type: Classroom program
Level: 4th-8th grade
Group Size: Minimum 10, maximum 1 class
Program Length: 1 hour
Program Requirements: One flat wall area 7’ tall by 10’ wide where a sheet of felt fabric can be hung.

Program Description:
Students research and present the story of a "mystery" bird species using a life-size puzzle of the bird.

The class will be divided into eight groups, each of which will receive a packet of information, graphics, and puzzle pieces that focuses on one part of the story. Each group studies their information, takes notes, presents their information to the class, and adds their puzzle pieces to the wall. Once the puzzle is completed, they will know which bird they have been describing. Shhh! Don’t tell them what the program is about! The less they know the more fun it is! (But we will tell you...it's a bald eagle.)

Key Concepts: raptor adaptations, human impact, survival, conservation, laws and voting

Potential follow-up activities: This program can be used by teachers as an introduction to student research projects on native animal species, including threats to their survival and ways to help the animals. It can also be an introduction or support to civics lessons on laws and voting, especially those focused on natural resources conservation.

Avian Mystery online request form

 
Silhouette of bird of prey flying

Education Standards Supported by this Program

Fourth Grade Next Generation Science Standards

Performance Expectations

4-LS1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

  • 4-LS1- 1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

Science and Engineering Practices

Engaging in Argument from Evidence

  • Construct an argument with evidence, data, and/or a model. (4-LS1- 1)

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS1.A: Structure and Function

  • Plants and animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction. (4-LS1- 1)

Crosscutting Concepts

Systems and System Models

  • A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (4-LS1- 1)

Fourth Grade Common Core ELA/Literacy Standards

Key Ideas and Details

  • RI 4.2 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RI 4.2: Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

Comprehension and Collaboration

  • SL 4.2: Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • SL 4.5: Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • W 4.8: Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.

Fifth Grade Next Generation Science Standards

Performance Expectations

5-ESS3 Earth and Human Activity

  • 5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment

Science and Engineering Practices

Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information

  • Obtain and combine information from books and/or other reliable media to explain phenomena or solutions to a design problem. (5-ESS3-1)

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems

  • Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and even outer space. But individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth’s resources and environments. (5-ESS3-1)

Crosscutting Concepts

Systems and System Models

  • A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. ( 5-ESS3-1)

Science Addresses Questions About the Natural and Material World

  • Science findings are limited to questions that can be answered with empirical evidence. (5- ESS3-1)

Fifth Grade Common Core ELA/Literacy Standards

Key Ideas and Details

  • RI 5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

Craft and Structure

  • RI.5.4: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.

Comprehension and Collaboration

  • SL 5.2: Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • W.5.8: Recall relevant information from experience or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.


Middle School (Sixth – Eighth Grade) Next Generation Science Standards

Performance Expectations

MS-LS1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

  • MS-LS1-4 Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively

MS-LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

  • MS-LS2-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem
  • MS-LS2-4 Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affects populations

Science and Engineering Practices

Engaging in Argument from Evidence

  • Use an oral and written argument supported by empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support or refute an explanation or a model for a phenomenon or a solution to a problem. (MS-LS1-4)
  • Construct an oral and written argument supported by empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support or refute an explanation or a model for a phenomenon or a solution to a problem. (MS-LS2-4)

Analyzing and Interpreting Data

  • Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena. (MS-LS2-1)

Scientific Knowledge is Based on Empirical Evidence

  • Science disciplines share common rules of obtaining and evaluating empirical evidence. (MS-LS2-4)

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems

  • Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and nonliving factors. (MS-LS2-1)
  • In any ecosystem, organisms and population with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. (MS-LS2-1)

LS1.B: Growth and Development of Organisms

  • Animals engage in characteristic behaviors that increase the odds of reproduction. (MS-LS1-4)

LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience

  • Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations. (MS-LS2-4)

Crosscutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

  • Phenomena may have more than one cause, and some cause and effect relationships in systems can only be described using probability. (MS-LS1-4)
  • Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-LS2-1)

Stability and Change

  • Small changes in one part of a system might cause large changes in another part. (MSLS2-4)

Middle School Common Core ELA/Literacy Standards

Key Ideas and Details

  • RI 6.2: Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgements.
  • RI 6.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.

Key Ideas and Details

  • RST.6-8.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts.
  • RST.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • WHST.6-8.9: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Last updated: January 4, 2018

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area
1008 Crest Drive

Coulee Dam, WA 99116

Phone:

(509) 754-7800

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