Inventory and Monitoring at Badlands National Park

Three biologists trek across barren land of the badlands
National Park Staff trek through the barren landscape at Badlands National Park to reach their monitoring location

NPS/S. Rockwood

Located in sparsely populated southwestern South Dakota, Badlands National Park consists of 242,756 acres of sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles, and spires interspersed with one of the largest protected mixed-grass prairie in the United States. Approximately 46% of the park has been mapped as barren badlands with an equal amount mapped as native prairie. These barren Badlands, along with the associated fossils, are widely viewed as the most significant natural resources in the park. However, the mixed-grass prairie ecosystem is also recognized as important.

At a regional scale, the park is significant because of the large prairie dog complexes, bison grazing, and the use of fire in maintaining the ecosystem. The endangered black-footed ferret makes the park globally important.

We monitor air quality, landbirds, plant communities, and weather and climate at this park.

Featured Information


Reports and Publications

Read more about our work at this park in the resource briefs (short summaries), protocols (monitoring procedures), monitoring reports (detailed results), or inventories (assessments and lists of natural resources) below.

Resource Briefs

Source: Data Store Saved Search 1208. To search for additional information, visit the Data Store.

Protocols

Source: Data Store Saved Search 1207. To search for additional information, visit the Data Store.

Monitoring Reports

Source: Data Store Saved Search 1202. To search for additional information, visit the Data Store.

Inventories

Source: Data Store Saved Search 3376. To search for additional information, visit the Data Store.


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    Last updated: August 19, 2018